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It’s that time audio enthusiasts! Registration for the 2019 Speaker Design Competition is now open! Visit midwestaudiofest.com for details and to list your speaker project. We are excited to see all returning participants, and look forward to meeting some new designers this year, as well! Be sure your plans include a visit to the Parts Express Tent Sale for the lowest prices of the year, and the Audio Swap Meet where you can buy and trade with other audio fans. We hope to see you this summer! Vivian and Jill
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Walnut Baronettes Build

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  • Walnut Baronettes Build

    Just a warning - this build will be in fits and starts. Such is life with toddlers!

    Today I had about an hour and a half in the garage so I managed to plane two large walnut boards. These are bookmatched as I had the shop resaw a 2" thick plank and I now have two 3/4" planed boards.

    Next step will be jointing the sides and cutting to rough part off, then I will be cutting a strip of 7 inches through each board that will be long enough for the sides and top. I will miter those pieces to get a continuous flow of the grain as well as a bookmatch grain.

    Baffles will be single pieces of walnut. We will see how far I get! The parts (excepting one CAT308 tweeter) are sitting at the border waiting for pickup. Weeeee!!
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    In this first pic I sanded the nearest board (just 120 grit) after planing and splashed some rubbing alcohol on it just to see the colour. LOVE it.
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    Here's a close up of one. There's some really nice character here along with some large birdseye flecks - didn't notice those when they were rough boards!
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Beautiful lumber. Good luck with the 45min-2hr sprints in time.
    Builds - C-Killa - Speedsters - LithMTM - Talking Sticks - Pocket Rockets - Khanspires - Dayton RS Center - RS225/28A - Kairos - Adelphos - SEOS TD12X - Dayton 8 - Needles - 871S - eD6c - Overnight Sensations - Tritrix (ported) - Lineup F4 - Stentorians - The Cheapies - Tub Thumpers - Barbells - Tuba HT - Numerous subwoofers - probably missing a few...... :p

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    • #3
      Gorgeous pieces! Looking forward to your build log.

      I think I hear a difference - wow, it's amazing!" Ethan Winer: audio myths
      "As God is my witness I'll never be without a good pair of speakers!" Scarlett O'Hara

      High value, high quality RS150/TB28-537SH bookshelf - TARGAS NLA!
      SB13/Vifa BC25SC06 MTM DCR Galeons-SB13-MTM
      My Voxel min sub Yet-another-Voxel-build

      Tangband W6-sub

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      • #4
        Man, I do love walnut. But over time I developed an allergy to it, and now every time I see a gorgeous piece of walnut lumber I have to slap myself away from it. I can actually work it, if I wear gloves, long sleeved clothing and a powered personal respirator. Same thing with cocobolo and anything in the rosewood family. The only positive is that those are all very expensive woods

        I was not allergic to it, but I got progressively more sensitized by stupidly not wearing proper protection: I kept using those cheap "surgical mask" filters, which might protect from the worst particles, but don't do enough for fine sawdust. A proper respirator with good fit is the least you should use. Don't do what I did, and wear proper protection, plus invest in a good filtration system if you do a lot of woodworking. Most people don't think about it, but sawdust is pretty dangerous stuff, especially for long term exposure

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        • #5
          walnut sawdust can kill a horse. it happened locally.

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          • #6
            Got the boards milled up and have mitered three sides of one cabinet. Miters turned out 90-95% good. Had some tearout on the inner cut but not going to worry about that. Only some very small gaps at the outer corner, so happy with that.

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            I did the packing tape method and honestly, I wish I had attempted miters long before as the glue up is soooooo much easier. Since I don't have a brad nailer, butt joint glue-ups are very difficult and always slide around so much in the clamps. These miters with the packing tape are so easy and is a stress free glue up. Just takes a few careful moments in saw and sled setup.

            Just if anyone new is reading, my miter method is (learned from lots of posts here):
            Set the blade at 45 using a 45-degree triangle/square and tilt the blade so that you are as close to perfectly 45 as you can get.
            I use my crosscut sled, so I have the triangle base set on the sled since I will be cutting on it.
            Set the boards outside faces up and tape with a straight edge along the top or bottom to keep all the panels aligned and then use packing tape along the joints.
            Turn it over, spread glue, and fold together, then clamp.

            If you haven't done mitered boxes, please give it a shot - I find them way way easier than butt joint boxes.

            One thing I didn't realize is that my finished faces would alternate. If I had had any flaws like knots on the middle piece in the first pic, they would have ended up on the finish side as I didn't realize it would alternate. Makes perfect sense after I cut it and put them together, but didn't occur to me while measuring the pieces out.

            Also, thanks for the notes above on respiratory protection. Will make sure to wear a mask especially when doing the router work.

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            • #7
              Those are going to be beautiful.

              These speakers are probably on my list for the next I'll make, so I'll be looking forward to your impressions. Although, considering how quickly I do things, 'next' probably means 5 years from now.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by scottvalentin View Post
                .....I use my crosscut sled, so I have the triangle base set on the sled since I will be cutting on it.....
                Any chance you can take a picture of your triangle base + crosscut sled?

                I've made my self a crosscut sled for 90 degree cuts, but haven't made anything to attempt miter cuts.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by dkalsi View Post

                  Any chance you can take a picture of your triangle base + crosscut sled?

                  I've made my self a crosscut sled for 90 degree cuts, but haven't made anything to attempt miter cuts.
                  Hi dkalsi I am just using a normal crosscut sled. All I meant is that I have the crosscut sled on the saw and have the blade at 45 degress (plus or minus) but then use a square like this guy Image result for triangle framing square
                  set on the base of the crosscut sled and check the blade angle with the square's 45 degree side to make sure I am exactly 45 with the base of the sled.

                  Thanks OldBeginner I am really looking forward to getting these together but hope to practice more patience through the build, especially at finishing stage, so that they will make me proud for 20+ years!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dkalsi View Post

                    Any chance you can take a picture of your triangle base + crosscut sled?

                    I've made my self a crosscut sled for 90 degree cuts, but haven't made anything to attempt miter cuts.
                    i don't want to hijack Scott's thread, but I converted my 90-degree crosscut sled into a convertible 90/45-degree sled by adding an insert to the part of the sled near the blade. I just swap out the insert when I change the cutting angle. I posted photos and details at LumberJocks. (The thumbnail below shows the sled pre-conversion.) A dedicated 45-degree sled might be better, but I don't have room to store one (and don't feel like building one anyway).

                    A Wixey digital angle gauge also makes it easy to set the blade angle relative to the table. You set it on the table surface, zero the gauge, then put it on the blade (it's magnetic) and tilt the blade until it shows the desired angle. It's very accurate; I don't even look at my saw's tilt gauge anymore.

                    Scott: your speakers are going to be beautiful. I love the walnut.

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                    • #11
                      Ron Stewart wow that is an amazing looking sled. I will post a pic of mine...in shame somewhat - but it does get the job done!
                      Also, I have a digital angle gauge, but for some reason it didn't setup correctly as my 45's were not 45 when I put them together. I will have to check it when I go out and do my cuts for the next 3 pieces. This will occur when it is not -35C outside (garage gets to about -10C after a few days of that). Next weekend hopefully.

                      Thanks for the kind words, I am very excited to see these start coming together.

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                      • #12
                        I see you used a dissimilar wood for the bottom. Any concern about wood swelling and movement being different in that panel, and stressing your joints down the road?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by skatz View Post
                          I see you used a dissimilar wood for the bottom. Any concern about wood swelling and movement being different in that panel, and stressing your joints down the road?
                          That is just a piece of birch ply holding it square while the glue sets, that piece isn't glued in. I think I will have enough walnut for the bottoms but have more planing and milling to do. Need the backs and the baffles and will see how much I have left. If I run out, the bottoms will be the birch ply. I don't know enough about wood movement to know if I would need to be concerned or not!

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                          • #14
                            I don't know a lot, but I think that wood movement with humidity changes is one reason for the preference for MDF and plywood in speaker boxes, they are more dimensionally stable with environmental changes. With two different wood types in a box, if one expands/contracts more than the others it could crack the joints. You are not using veneer, but that could possibly be a problem if used on different wood types.
                            By the way, that walnut you have is gorgeous!

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                            • #15
                              Thanks for your comment on my sled' Scott. I guess it looks better in photos, because it's just ugly MDF. I'm happy with it, though.

                              It's odd that your digital gauge didn't yield a 45-degree angle, but your method using the triangles obviously did the trick. I wouldn't try to work in my garage at -10C either!

                              Regarding wood movement, I think you'd be better off using walnut for the base. The walnut is going to move mostly across the grain (from front to back), and the plywood won't move as much. Your cabinet sides look pretty wide, so the amount of movement may be non-trivial. I'm sure you can find a chart somewhere that will give you an actual value.

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