Announcement

Collapse

Midwest Audio Fest

It’s that time audio enthusiasts! Registration for the 2019 Speaker Design Competition is now open! Visit midwestaudiofest.com for details and to list your speaker project. We are excited to see all returning participants, and look forward to meeting some new designers this year, as well! Be sure your plans include a visit to the Parts Express Tent Sale for the lowest prices of the year, and the Audio Swap Meet where you can buy and trade with other audio fans. We hope to see you this summer! Vivian and Jill
See more
See less

Will a passive radiator work with a full range driver (that has a whizzer cone)?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Will a passive radiator work with a full range driver (that has a whizzer cone)?

    Does it make any sense to use a passive radiator with a full range speaker (that has a whizzer cone)?

    Lino

  • dynamo
    replied
    A slightly bigger 5L box tuned to 60hz (1”d x 2.6”l port) will give a slight dip above tuning but lower your f3 to 52hz.

    Leave a comment:


  • dynamo
    replied
    I’m using an app on my phone at the moment that can’t do passives, but a ported box of 3.57L with a 1” diameter round port that is 3.3” long should give you a nice flat low end down to an f3 of 56hz. Doesn’t seem worth the cost of a pr unless you want it for aesthetics.

    I would also plan to use a simple baffle step filter to make up for lost bass. A simple explanation of this is that when a speaker is on a small baffle away from the floor and walls, the long wavelength bass frequencies wrap around the box unreinforced and lose up to 6db (a lot). A simple contour filter sacrifices overall output but restores a flat fuller sounding response.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris Roemer
    replied
    Typical use for a PR (which tend to co$t a bit more than a plastic or cardboard tube) is to tune a box low, where a port's length can become problematic.
    I don't consider 70Hz low.

    Leave a comment:


  • fpitas
    replied
    Originally posted by marceleonidas View Post
    Even despite the fact that it would lose its air seal? I would think that it would lose a substantial amount of power. BUT I am just a simple noob
    Ports don't lose power, they resonate and emit power from the driver back wave, which then adds to the front wave. A passive radiator does the same function. A port is a lot cheaper, and usually works as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • dynamo
    replied
    Originally posted by billfitzmaurice View Post
    It's actually a pole piece extension, a phase plug is something else entirely. Not that you're at fault in the misuse of the term, even Dayton gets it wrong. Many call pole piece extensions phase plugs because bullet style pole piece extensions look like phase plugs, but they don't act like phase plugs.
    http://www.centauriaudio.com.au/diy/plugs.html
    Interesting info, thanks Bill!

    Leave a comment:


  • billfitzmaurice
    replied
    It's actually a pole piece extension, a phase plug is something else entirely. Not that you're at fault in the misuse of the term, even Dayton gets it wrong. Many call pole piece extensions phase plugs because bullet style pole piece extensions look like phase plugs, but they don't act like phase plugs.
    http://www.centauriaudio.com.au/diy/plugs.html

    Leave a comment:


  • isaeagle4031
    replied
    Originally posted by marceleonidas View Post
    When using a driver with a whizzer cone air is able to enter/ escape the cabinet around the whizzer cone, yes? If it is easier for air to enter/ escape the cabinet than drive the PR then the PR would move significantly less than in a cabinet that is completely airtight, yes?

    Off the tip top of my head:
    Driver: Dayton Audio RS-100-4
    PR: Dayton Audio ND105
    The RS100-4 doesn't have whizzer cone. That is a phase plug. The PR will work

    Leave a comment:


  • dynamo
    replied
    A whizzer cone would have nothing to do with it. If the driver had a sealed dust cap and a whizzer cone no air would exit the gap. If it was a phase plug, some air would be able to move but it would not affect tuning at all, so no need to worry about it.

    The RS100 does not have a whizzer cone, btw, just a phase plug. That pr should work with it but you may want two. A general rule of thumb is to have twice the area of radiators as the driver. I don’t have time to model it now, sorry.

    Leave a comment:


  • marceleonidas
    replied
    When using a driver with a whizzer cone air is able to enter/ escape the cabinet around the whizzer cone, yes? If it is easier for air to enter/ escape the cabinet than drive the PR then the PR would move significantly less than in a cabinet that is completely airtight, yes?

    Off the tip top of my head:
    Driver: Dayton Audio RS-100-4
    PR: Dayton Audio ND105

    Leave a comment:


  • dynamo
    replied
    If you mean that the radiatior just flops around this is true, but you tune it with weight to resonate at a specific frequency to actually add to the low end, not losing it.

    What is the full range driver and passive radiator you are considering? Not all drivers are made to work in a passive radiator / ported (bass reflex) enclosure.

    Leave a comment:


  • dynamo
    replied
    Not sure I follow you about the air seal?

    Leave a comment:


  • marceleonidas
    replied
    Even despite the fact that it would lose its air seal? I would think that it would lose a substantial amount of power. BUT I am just a simple noob

    Leave a comment:


  • wogg
    replied
    A passive radiator is, for all technical purposes, nothing but a port. If the speaker works well in a ported box, it will work fine with a passive radiator as well.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X