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Small room for speaker testing / And peace and quite.

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  • Small room for speaker testing / And peace and quite.

    Hey, I have been dreaming about building a small maybe a 5x8 or so room for speaker testing and just to have a quite place to chill to some music. I am not looking for a recording studio, or building a foam fire trap. So far I am thinking of 2 layers of 5/8 sheet rock with 1inch air space between them. There will be a small hvac vent installed for cooling. I guess what I need to know is how to deaden the room with out making it into a fire trap. Would acoustic foam wedges be safer? I am not a smoker but I put safety 1st lol.
    Fyi, I would like to do this with out breaking the bank, was hoping someone already tried this and dan tell me how it turned out.
    Thanks,
    Mlt2

  • #2
    Don't bother with the air space, all you'd be doing is creating resonant panels. Glue the two layers of sheet rock together. 5x 8 is a bit too small IMO. 8x10 is more like it. Carpet the floor and tile the ceiling with acoustical tiles and you probably won't have to do much for early reflection control. Look at Ethan Winer's site for advice on that.
    www.billfitzmaurice.com
    www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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    • #3
      Something that I haven't heard talked about in years is Homasote. Does a great job of deadening sound. I have used it to good effect to sound proof a room.

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      • #4
        If I was doing a testing room the shape would be non-symmetrical, the outside of the room would be 1/2 drywall, caulked for air seal, then 2 x 4 stud cavities with Roxul, then covered with fabric. Same for the ceiling. Room vent 1 inlet and 1 outlet with a insulation lined rectangular duct (wood or metal) with at least 1, 90 degree bend in each for a silencer. Add a weather stripped door. I'd probably add a continuous exhaust fan after the silencer.

        In a small room I want to reduce as many of the early reflections as possible.
        John H

        Synergy Horn, SLS-85, BMR-3L, Mini-TL, BR-2, Titan OB, B452, Udique, Vultus, Latus1, Seriatim, Aperivox,Pencil Tower

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        • #5
          My basement listening room is roughly 10x11. I Googled a lot of info before I built it and recording studio folks have lots of tricks.

          My room is a room within a room. Two walls are concrete foundation walls and only have 2x2 firing with blue board insulation below the sheet rock. The other two walls are two separate 2x4 stud walls with a 1 inch space between them. Both sides of each wall are sheet rocked and everything is caulked. Air leaks are a path for sound to travel through so you want to minimize them. The ceiling is hung from a set of ceiling joists that interleave the floor joists of the bedroom above. The inside of the room is sheet rocked and then another layer of sheet rock is hung using resilient channel. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IYyZ9zonfdg

          There is a single AC feed to the room and all the AC and track lighting are surface mounted. Again this is to cut down on air paths to the outside. The inner walls and ceiling were insulated with Icynene foam insulation. If I did it again I'd probably use Ultratouch insulation.

          The door is 4 panel solid MDF and the inside panels have 1" Ultratouch acoustic tiles applied. Its weather stripped top to bottom and is as air tight as I can make it.

          I used Ultratouch acoustic tiles for room treatment. The room wasn't bad when I built it but the carpet got wet so the floor got tiled and an area rug went in which made it ring badly.

          I build a labyrinth baffle lined with Ultratouch lining and a bathroom vent fan to pull air into the room. There's a 4" PVC pipe through the wall into a neighboring closet that serves at a fresh air inlet.

          Once the room was together I played some frequency sweeps and made sure there were no buzzes and rattles. The surface mount electrical runs needed a fair amount of work in that area.

          How does it work? It's quiet. I don't hear the washer, dryer, refrigerator, or furnace in adjoining rooms. My wife can sleep while I listen to music at 85db levels at midnight as long as it doesn't contain deep bass. (Bass goes everywhere.)

          Ron
          C-Note Iron Driver Build
          The Lydias
          The Cherry π's
          The Champs - Iron Driver 2015 Entry
          My Projects Page

          The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it. - Neil deGrasse Tyson
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjuGCJJUGsg

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          • #6
            Ron_e this sounds like what I am needing. Not looking for a studio just a nice quit place This will, be built inside my bed room ad used some. I do have a pioneers elite.452 7.2 channel. ANY recommend one some good raw woofer, tweeters for this setup? Not looking for loud but Hi fi. And some speaker testing lol

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            • #7
              I prefer a really big room with lots of random junk to minimize reflections
              I was tired and got tired again so now I am Re tired.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Ron_E View Post
                My basement listening room is roughly 10x11. I Googled a lot of info before I built it and recording studio folks have lots of tricks.

                My room is a room within a room. Two walls are concrete foundation walls and only have 2x2 firing with blue board insulation below the sheet rock. The other two walls are two separate 2x4 stud walls with a 1 inch space between them. Both sides of each wall are sheet rocked and everything is caulked.

                Ron
                For sound proofing your better off not putting sheet rock on the inside of the double walls but just insulating both walls, believe it or not less sound will be able to transfer.

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                • #9
                  You will want a bigger room, I promise.

                  Insulation does very little overall for sound but your best bet will be a rock wool like safe n sound.

                  5/8 type x Sheetrock (not lightweight) is better for sound isolation than non type x. Use two layers with green glue between them. If you wanted to be hardcore you can use an isolation system to hang the rock.

                  You can do a lot with these things for normal sounds but there’s no stopping deep bass.

                  Run a new dedicated 20a circuit right away too.
                  Projects:

                  Breezy Monitors: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/fo...reezy-monitors
                  transcenD: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/fo...5035-transcend
                  Summits: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...75-The-Summits
                  References: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...-My-References
                  Vintage Style 2-way: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...-vintage-2-way

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                  • #10
                    You do not want a dead room, sounds terrible! You need diffusion. Book cases work well

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by dawnut View Post
                      For sound proofing your better off not putting sheet rock on the inside of the double walls but just insulating both walls, believe it or not less sound will be able to transfer.
                      That's a technique used for making a room anechoic, not for reducing sound transmission.

                      www.billfitzmaurice.com
                      www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ontariomaximus View Post
                        You do not want a dead room, sounds terrible! You need diffusion. Book cases work well
                        I like dead rooms
                        Francis

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by billfitzmaurice View Post
                          That's a technique used for making a room anechoic, not for reducing sound transmission.

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                          • #14
                            The dead room is a good starting point though then you can add diffusion as necessary. I’m sure he doesn’t want to settle into his new zen room to sip scotch and listen to Diana Krall with the wash machine, furnace, and neighbors snowblower all in the mix.
                            Projects:

                            Breezy Monitors: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/fo...reezy-monitors
                            transcenD: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/fo...5035-transcend
                            Summits: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...75-The-Summits
                            References: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...-My-References
                            Vintage Style 2-way: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...-vintage-2-way

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by dawnut View Post
                              Your picture doesn't match your description. Now that I see what you meant if there is an actual double wall as shown it would reduce transmission further if there was sheet rock on the inside of both sets of studs. It's seldom done that way. Usually one set of studs nests in the bays created by the second set of studs, to minimize the overall wall thickness while realizing no stud connection between the inner and outer faces.
                              www.billfitzmaurice.com
                              www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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