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The Defiants - InDIYana 2019 Build

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  • KEtheredge87
    replied
    Originally posted by 4thtry View Post
    Nice fix on your boo-boo. I had some "wavy-ness" on my Kowaxial curves too, but no one mentioned it at any of the shows. I really doubt that anyone will ever see this. Once they are painted, that small, little mistake should disappear. I could hear a slight change in pitch on your first knuckle rap test, but the 2nd test sounded the same on both cabs. I had 6 layers too on my Kowaxial curves and I was amazed at how strong HDF becomes when bent and glued like this.

    Good luck! Can't wait to see and hear these in Indy,

    Bill
    Thanks Bill! Your SideTowers are quite unique as well, InDIYana never disappoints!

    Leave a comment:


  • 4thtry
    replied
    Nice fix on your boo-boo. I had some "wavy-ness" on my Kowaxial curves too, but no one mentioned it at any of the shows. I really doubt that anyone will ever see this. Once they are painted, that small, little mistake should disappear. I could hear a slight change in pitch on your first knuckle rap test, but the 2nd test sounded the same on both cabs. I had 6 layers too on my Kowaxial curves and I was amazed at how strong HDF becomes when bent and glued like this.

    Good luck! Can't wait to see and hear these in Indy,

    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • KEtheredge87
    replied
    Here's a YouTube video showing a knuckle test on the walls of The Defiants.

    Leave a comment:


  • KEtheredge87
    replied
    Hi Guys,

    It's been a few days, and I have another "boo-boo" to report and share a fix. Working on cabinet "B" I did a two layer glue-up and was having a hell of a time with the panels trying to slide backward as I clamped them down. This time it was both panels on each side shifting as a unit (yay nails!) rather than one layer shifting relative to the others.

    I had the idea to apply a clamp to between the front cabinet panel and the rear cauls to keep things from sliding backwards. I think I went a little too overboard with this clamp, or had my clamping forces unbalanced, because I actually made a thin but deep void on the edge of one side. Maybe 5" wide and 6" deep at the worst point! Rather than ripping those panels off, I decided to fill the gap with some 5 minute epoxy.

    I think this worked out pretty well. I made little hot tub for the resin and hardener to warm them up, thereby reducing the epoxy's viscosity as much as I could before pouring it into the crack. It still didn't flow as easily as I would have liked, so I used a popsicle stick as a ram-rod and stuffed it all down into the crack. From there I gave it a good few hours to totally harden, then trimmed the cabinet as normal. Technically, that side of the cabinet has a slight difference in the radius of the curve from that point forward. However it's not noticeable in the final product. The curve really hides the minor error that got introduced this way.

    Since this point, I've finished Cabinet B's side panel glue-ups and trimmings completely. Tonight I will be finishing the same final trimming on Cabinet A. Using 6 layers of 1/8" HDF makes this sucker HEAVY and really non-resonant. I'll post a YouTube video in a moment that shows a knuckle test of 4 layers vs 6 layers in the final product. Next on the docket I'll be moving on to front baffle work and top-face curve toward the rear of the cabinets!

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  • tomzarbo
    replied
    Nice work Keith.

    That second pic looks just like the same amount of coverage I use on my panels nowadays.

    Thanks for posting your boo-boo and resulting fix.
    Reading this hopefully helps someone else avoid the same issue in the future.

    And just like me... I betcha' you won't make that mistake again!

    TomZ

    Leave a comment:


  • Kevin K.
    replied
    Originally posted by KEtheredge87 View Post

    Also tried the Kevin K. nail method for keeping my glue-up panels from sliding around and it definitely did the trick! Thanks for the helpful suggestion bud!
    The nails are a wee bit bigger than I had in mind, lol. But I'm glad it worked out for you. Looking good!

    Leave a comment:


  • KEtheredge87
    replied
    Tonight I was able to glue up a replacement layer on the poor, poor cabinet that got the chisel treatment. I took time yesterday to apply bondo to all the deep (relatively speaking) gouges that I made while removing the initial 2nd layer. All the bondo was sanded smooth with 80 grit ROS work in prep for more glue. The surface itself was not perfectly following the contour any more, but I made sure I only had barely-there depressions rather than mounds of bondo sticking out. My assumption is that the following layers of HDF will restore the proper curvature, and all will be well.

    I remember TomZ's video mentioning that gluing up only one layer at a time wasn't ideal since the HDF is so thin and relatively flexible. To account for that on this single layer glue-up, I included a second layer without any glue and a good saran wrap shield to keep glue off of it for use later. This way I got a little more clamping force distributed by using that dry layer as a caul of sorts, and the overall curvature was maintained. I am much happier with this glue-up because there was actual squeeze out! No way this one is going to delaminate later. Now I feel secure in a job well done.

    Also tried the Kevin K. nail method for keeping my glue-up panels from sliding around and it definitely did the trick! Thanks for the helpful suggestion bud!

    Tomorrow I will inspect the repair glue-up results and get the repaired cabinet caught up to it's brother. With any luck I'll get flush trimming done on the 1st and 2nd layers and get layers 3 and 4 glued up and drying overnight.

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  • ScottK@PE
    replied
    Looks great so far man. Looking forward to hearing them.

    Cheers!.

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  • KEtheredge87
    replied
    Sometimes in speaker building you're as much a sculptor as a carpenter... tonight was one of those nights! I kept thinking about my first cabinet glue up and the iffy amount of glue that ended up there (A.K.A. "where's the squeeze out?") so I decided to poke at things a bit. Before long I was poking a bit harder with a hammer and chisel to pop that outer layer of HDF off. It was a risky decision, but I'm glad I chose to do it. Once I was deep into it, I wasn't thrilled with the glue results on one of the sides. I definitely didn't want to build the whole cabinet only to have a delamination later. Now was the time to fix it.

    I tried my best to take shallow angle cuts with the chisel... really more of a prying action than a purposeful cut... and generally removed only the top layer of HDF. Once I got to the halfway point, the smooth factory brown top layer on the HDF did serve as a bit of a depth guide. I only punched through the wall once, and only a little bit... but bless that Noico 80! It's holding up the HDF structure just fine for now. I'll put some bondo on all the actual gouges I made and re-prep this guy for another glue up soon.

    For now... enjoy the carnage!

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  • Mark65
    replied
    Man, that's awesome stuff. Can't wait to see the end result.

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  • JavadS
    replied
    Nice Keith, looking good, I'll be following along =)

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  • tomzarbo
    replied
    Originally posted by Kevin K. View Post
    tomzarbo , have you ever tried these on one of your curved cabinets? Would probably take three of them for a cabinet the size Keith is working on. Not sure how it would work out though with the overhang. Guess you could put a false board on the front and back to keep it from crushing the overhang.

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    Anyway, good luck to you Keith and I always get a kick out of your sense of humor. The big "CRAP" arrow almost had me rolling on the floor. Sorry it happened to you and hoping it wont happen again.
    Kevin,
    I do have, and use a set of corner strap clamps similar to that, two of them actually. My sister bought me one a few years back, and after I used it and discovered that it really works, I picked up one more for medium sized boxes. They're really good for boxes with mitered corners.

    Truthfully, the caul-and-clamp method works so well, evening out the pressure, that it's just money for me. The next set of cabinets Keith does this way will go much smoother I'm sure. I had hiccups too the first time I did this. Glue really makes things slippery on top of everything else, so I usually leave a bit more overhang when it inevitably happens.

    Looking at your pics Keith, I'd say you'll probably be alright with the amount of glue you applied, but just to be safe, I use probably twice that. I pour it from the gallon jug right on the panels. Yes, a lot of it just drips out while clamping, but it's just better to have too much than not enough. Learned that the hard way. Once you get things unclamped you can do the tap test with your middle fingernail and you'll hear any spots that aren't held fast because of the different higher pitch thunk.

    Man, I forgot that my hair used to be a color back then other than white. Guess I should just be happy I have some.

    TomZ

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  • ugly woofer
    replied
    I have used titebond III, but I really like epoxy with slow hardener.

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  • Kevin K.
    replied
    Originally posted by KEtheredge87 View Post

    Thanks bud! I'm a firm believer that if we can't laugh about things, we're not doing it right. I'll live and learn, and I've certainly recovered projects from bigger snafus!
    Absolutely man! Mistakes will almost always be part of a DIY build, some worse than others. IMO, the merit of a good DIYer is being able to recover and if we can laugh at ourselves afterwards, even better.

    Leave a comment:


  • KEtheredge87
    replied
    Originally posted by Kevin K. View Post
    [ ...I always get a kick out of your sense of humor. The big "CRAP" arrow almost had me rolling on the floor. Sorry it happened to you and hoping it wont happen again.
    Thanks bud! I'm a firm believer that if we can't laugh about things, we're not doing it right. I'll live and learn, and I've certainly recovered projects from bigger snafus!

    Leave a comment:

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