Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Defiants - InDIYana 2019 Build

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • KEtheredge87
    replied
    Originally posted by Kevin K. View Post
    Keith, John makes a really good point, veneering facets is challenging. I've tried it a couple of different ways, the iron-on method and cold pressing it using cauls to clamp the veneer pieces. It's time consuming either way because trimming and sanding is a little more difficult. Not trying to discourage you, and I love the look of your original rendering. If you decide to pursue it, my suggestion would be to glue up a couple of scraps of mdf, apply facets, and practice on them with some scrap veneer if you have any left from another project or have some surplus from this project. The hand router/grinder method I used on the arrays works pretty good for cutting some of the excess off. I usually tried to leave about a 1/16" from the router and hand sanded with a block from there. Let me know if you need a link to the cutter I used in the hand router/grinder.
    Thanks Kevin and jhollander , I'm sure I have my work cut out for me! Kevin, do you mean you chucked a 1/4" downcut spiral flush trim bit into a die grinder and used that to trim in close on the veneered facets? I did a little sleuthing through your desktop CBT and Gandalf's projects to find that clue. If so that's an interesting suggestion! I suppose you can still ride the bearing against the surface and keep a very shallow angle on the bit so that you aren't 100% flush cutting, and thereby keep the bit from rocking down and gouging into the wood... CAREFULLY!!!!

    John - I'd be interested to know more about your facet cutting jig that was mentioned above... Right now my plan is to copy Jon Marsh and "ColoradoTom" from HTShack in the Ardent (Avalon clone) build thread... Shamelessly stolen pictures detailing that plan below.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Ardent_HTSHack_FacetCutting.jpg
Views:	41
Size:	99.2 KB
ID:	1405753Click image for larger version

Name:	Ardent_HTShack_TaperJig.jpg
Views:	41
Size:	118.9 KB
ID:	1405754

    Leave a comment:


  • Kevin K.
    replied
    Keith, John makes a really good point, veneering facets is challenging. I've tried it a couple of different ways, the iron-on method and cold pressing it using cauls to clamp the veneer pieces. It's time consuming either way because trimming and sanding is a little more difficult. Not trying to discourage you, and I love the look of your original rendering. If you decide to pursue it, my suggestion would be to glue up a couple of scraps of mdf, apply facets, and practice on them with some scrap veneer if you have any left from another project or have some surplus from this project. The hand router/grinder method I used on the arrays works pretty good for cutting some of the excess off. I usually tried to leave about a 1/16" from the router and hand sanded with a block from there. Let me know if you need a link to the cutter I used in the hand router/grinder.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhollander
    replied
    Could veneer the body (hence the extra HDF layers) and paint the MDF baffle. Veneering facets is not fun as that's what I did for Indy. My only other tip was I found using CAD to design my table facet template very helpful. I was able to get both left hand and right hand setups on one jig.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kevin K.
    replied
    Originally posted by KEtheredge87 View Post

    Hey Kevin, perhaps I have shown my cards a bit .

    Err... We are not at liberty to discuss ongoing investigations... At this time we can neither confirm nor deny the existence any veneering plans.... We plead the 5th... OK, I think I'm out of dodgy pseudo-non-answers!

    IF such a plan were to exist, I would certainly glue the baffle to the front panel prior to veneering, which would render any such squeeze-out concerns moot.

    IF a new direction is recommended by the SkunkWorx at Etheredge Audio Engineering, then these speakers will be highly "Defiant" indeed
    Lol, OK, I gotcha now. So, hypothetically, if one were to veneer the baffles and cabinets separately, and one wishes not to deal with glue squeeze out ruining the veneer on either piece after attaching the two together, one might apply masking tape to the veneer edges on both pieces prior to joining them. Any excess should land on the tape which could easily be removed after said glue was dry. One would be sure to use the "delicate surface" masking tape, the kind that would stick well enough for this kind of experiment but not damage the veneer as it was peeled off later. Hypothetically speaking of course. Good luck bud.

    Leave a comment:


  • KEtheredge87
    replied
    Originally posted by Kevin K. View Post

    Trying to understand your concern of the glue squeezing out? Are you planning to veneer the baffle separately from the rest of the cabinet and attach it afterwards?
    Hey Kevin, perhaps I have shown my cards a bit .

    Err... We are not at liberty to discuss ongoing investigations... At this time we can neither confirm nor deny the existence any veneering plans.... We plead the 5th... OK, I think I'm out of dodgy pseudo-non-answers!

    IF such a plan were to exist, I would certainly glue the baffle to the front panel prior to veneering, which would render any such squeeze-out concerns moot.

    IF a new direction is recommended by the SkunkWorx at Etheredge Audio Engineering, then these speakers will be highly "Defiant" indeed

    Leave a comment:


  • Kevin K.
    replied
    Originally posted by KEtheredge87 View Post
    You make a good point Tom... The dowels and driver holes will definitely get some titebond II when it's time for final assembly but I do wonder how much glue I'll actually need for a proper seal. I would rather not have any squeeze out on the exterior faces of this joint when it's time for assembly, so I'll have to give that some more thought.
    Trying to understand your concern of the glue squeezing out? Are you planning to veneer the baffle separately from the rest of the cabinet and attach it afterwards?

    Leave a comment:


  • KEtheredge87
    replied
    You make a good point Tom... The dowels and driver holes will definitely get some titebond II when it's time for final assembly but I do wonder how much glue I'll actually need for a proper seal. I would rather not have any squeeze out on the exterior faces of this joint when it's time for assembly, so I'll have to give that some more thought.

    Leave a comment:


  • tomzarbo
    replied
    Looking good! I love using the dowels to locate the baffle, as long as you're lined up before 'whacking' the baffle, you're golden. It's Tom-proof. Those six dowels will probably do all the holding that you need. I used 4 on my recent set of Encores, and I'd bet that I could have just epoxied the dowel areas (not the rest of the baffle) and used speaker gasket material to make the seal, not that I'd do that, but I bet it would work.

    TomZ

    Leave a comment:


  • KEtheredge87
    replied
    Updates Part 2 - The Front Baffles Begin!

    I'm using a dowel method to attach the front baffles to the cabinets. In order to make the flush cuts for sizing, I drilled 1/2" deep size F holes (just barely over 0.25" in diameter) in the cabinet, and used 0.25" transfer pins to mark the rough sized front baffles. A few whacks with a deadblow mallet transferred the center locations for the dowels to the baffles, which were drilled with the same F drill bit... this time just a little more than 1/2" deep. I'm using six fluted 1/4" dowels to locate the baffles, and once they were in place, the baffles were marked with a pencil to show the rough cut line, then a bandsaw was used to trim excess material. Final flush cut was done on the router table with the cabinet sitting on top of the baffle as the template.

    I made two baffles per cabinet in case I screw one up as I make faceted cuts, so I have four baffle blanks for two cabinets. Next steps will be creating the facet jig and marking the baffles for embedding grille magnets. Making progress!

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20190305_194945.jpg
Views:	62
Size:	511.8 KB
ID:	1405608Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20190305_194643.jpg
Views:	60
Size:	759.4 KB
ID:	1405609Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20190305_195341.jpg
Views:	60
Size:	818.9 KB
ID:	1405610Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20190305_214226.jpg
Views:	62
Size:	503.1 KB
ID:	1405612Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20190305_221729.jpg
Views:	62
Size:	907.0 KB
ID:	1405611

    Leave a comment:


  • KEtheredge87
    replied
    It's been a busy last few days both in the shop and outside the shop... so here's some updates. Part 1 - Operation Top Hat is complete. I now have one layer of 1/8" HDF glued to the top of both cabinets as a way to avoid any potential ghosting of the MDF layers through the final veneer. Technically I could do the same thing with the rear and bottom, but I really want to move forward, and I'm not worried about ghosting on those surfaces.

    The cabinets are also nearly equivalent in height and curvature now, which satisfies my engineering OCD. It'll never be 100% perfect just because of my assembly technique and small differences in the sanding/leveling process, but this is definitely good enough!

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20190305_192421.jpg
Views:	57
Size:	794.3 KB
ID:	1405602Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20190305_192407.jpg
Views:	57
Size:	952.8 KB
ID:	1405603Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20190305_192355.jpg
Views:	57
Size:	516.6 KB
ID:	1405605Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20190305_192448.jpg
Views:	59
Size:	919.4 KB
ID:	1405604Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20190305_192503.jpg
Views:	59
Size:	855.7 KB
ID:	1405606

    Leave a comment:


  • Billet
    replied
    Originally posted by KEtheredge87 View Post
    My shop floor is super slippery now, which is not good. Even vacuuming with the shopvac wasn't enough to relieve the slip-factor, so I'll actually have to mop the floor in there! That never happens...
    I am pretty sure that most body filler contains talc, that might be why it is so slippery. To reduce the amount of dust, you could use a Surform file to remove the high spots before the filler fully hardens. This is commonly done in auto body repair.

    Leave a comment:


  • KEtheredge87
    replied
    Hey Guys - Quick update for you all.

    I'm still putting the finishing touches on the curved tops. I liked Ben's suggestion of skinning the top with a additional layer of 1/8" HDF, so "Operation Top Hat" was born. I scuff sanded the Evercoat filler to 100 grit before applying the titebond wood glue and letting things clamp up overnight. Of course, this piece also wanted to slide around on me while gluing, so I wrapped a piece of MDF in saran wrap and clamped it tot he front as a slide-stop. Worked out great!

    While that was clamped and gluing up, I decided to go ahead and slather some Evercoat on the top of the first cabinet I curved. The more I thought about it, I wasn't convinced that I would have the same curvature on that cabinet since it was cut with my original tooling attempt. I couldn't abide that, so I put the work in and built it up just to shave it down at the right curvature. My shop floor is super slippery now, which is not good. Even vacuuming with the shopvac wasn't enough to relieve the slip-factor, so I'll actually have to mop the floor in there! That never happens...

    In preparation for starting the front baffle work, I've been studying the table saw and taper jig bevel method and will be making a sled for that soon. I also went back to my CAD files and included the new 1/8" top hat to make sure none of my bevel angles needed to change. Lastly I confirmed locations for grille magnets, even though I don't like grilles all that much. I suppose I like grilles more than punched in tweeters, so that seems like some future effort well spent for insurance!

    Happy Saturday!

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20190301_200839.jpg
Views:	62
Size:	908.8 KB
ID:	1405216Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20190301_202528.jpg
Views:	63
Size:	891.5 KB
ID:	1405217Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20190301_202516.jpg
Views:	63
Size:	956.3 KB
ID:	1405218Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20190302_100145.jpg
Views:	62
Size:	528.4 KB
ID:	1405220Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20190301_211149.jpg
Views:	62
Size:	938.9 KB
ID:	1405219

    Leave a comment:


  • KEtheredge87
    replied
    Originally posted by 4thtry View Post
    Cool project and vids. Not sure what you are using, but if your camera has manual focus, ISO, F stop, etc., you might be able to avoid the auto focus problem by switching over to manual. Just a thought.
    Thanks Bill! I was using my Google Pixel 2 XL smartphone for those videos, which unfortunately does not seem to have manual focus controls. Occasionally I think about getting a GoPro for stuff like this, but I never actually commit to it.

    Leave a comment:


  • 4thtry
    replied
    Cool project and vids. Not sure what you are using, but if your camera has manual focus, ISO, F stop, etc., you might be able to avoid the auto focus problem by switching over to manual. Just a thought.

    Leave a comment:


  • xmax
    replied
    I love it!

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X