Announcement

Collapse
1 of 2 < >

Midwest Audio Fest

It’s that time audio enthusiasts!

Registration for the 2019 Speaker Design Competition is now open! Visit midwestaudiofest.com for details and to list your speaker project.
We are excited to see all returning participants, and look forward to meeting some new designers this year, as well!

Be sure your plans include a visit to the Parts Express Tent Sale for the lowest prices of the year, and the Audio Swap Meet where you can buy and trade with other audio fans.

We hope to see you this summer!

Vivian and Jill
2 of 2 < >

Midwest Audio Fest

It’s that time audio enthusiasts! Registration for the 2019 Speaker Design Competition is now open! Visit midwestaudiofest.com for details and to list your speaker project. We are excited to see all returning participants, and look forward to meeting some new designers this year, as well! Be sure your plans include a visit to the Parts Express Tent Sale for the lowest prices of the year, and the Audio Swap Meet where you can buy and trade with other audio fans. We hope to see you this summer! Vivian and Jill
See more
See less

First 5.1 system build using HIVI drivers

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • First 5.1 system build using HIVI drivers

    Hello everyone, you may or may not remember me from about half a year ago when I was asking questions about building a center channel speaker to match a HIVI kit that I had just purchased... Well I had promised to do a build thread for the DIY kit as well as the center channel. Well the good news is that I actually have completed the HIVI kit, but I have yet to touch the center channel speaker. In this thread I'll log my ongoing home theater project (including what I have done over the past 6 months) and also use this as a way to gather help/insight of building the remaining speakers to the system. I am not going to pretend that I have a wealth of knowledge and wisdom because I actually don't at all. That is why I value anyone's insight even if it's factual or simply subjective, I am here to learn .

    Background

    After reading this forum and others around the internet, I do not qualify myself as an audiophile at all. With that being said I do appreciate a good set of speakers and can notice certain nuances between speakers. Up until this project, my background in speakers came from the actively powered PC desktop variety. My first set of speakers was a basic Logitech 2.1 system and which lasted me a good 5 years before I bought my next set of speakers which pushed my appreciation for speakers: the Swans M10. It's with this 2.1 system that I realized that this is the type of brand I value. It definitely was not the best set of speakers around but the style was certainly there, the way it was packaged was incredible (they deliver a set of white gloves to unbox...) and the sound to my ears was incredible. All of that for $100... incredible. At this point the speaker bug caught me and about 2 years later I bought a set again: the Swans M200 MKII. Without doing any research, after about a month I swapped the stock HIVI S5N driver for a HIVI M5N driver simply because I liked the look of it not knowing that the crossover/cabinet was not tuned for this driver. All I can say is that this pair is still my go to setup on my desktop and to me they sound amazing.

    I do not want to sound like a broken record but I simply love HIVI as a brand because it hits all the points for me:

    Price range (it is certainly not expensive but I wouldn't say the cheapest
    Quality (when comparing the price to what I have around me in Canada, they are phenomenal)
    Style (they definitely have look like some of the best drivers IMO)

    Combine those 3 points together and it equals high value which of course is subjective to everyone! For example, I am absolutely positive that if I were to use a set of dynaudio drivers I would most definitely have high marks in both points 2 and 3, but the price range for me would be way off and the value to me would be different.

    Project Overview

    So this project started with me wanting to build a set of speakers that I could use predominantly for music purposes. I listen to a variety of music from punk, rock, folk and from time to time some electronic. One day while randomly browsing the internet I saw that HIVI produces a DIY 3-way speaker for at the time $250.

    Link: https://www.amazon.com/HiVi-Bookshel.../dp/B0721ZQXDG (Now the price has jumped!)

    After reading many reviews for both their 2-way DIY kit and their 3-way DIY Kit, I decided on the 3-way mostly for the reason that it modeled the Swans M3 and that I have never heard let alone owned a 3-way design at all. On top of all this I would forever have afterthoughts that I bought a "lower end" model if I chose the cheaper 2-way system. Go big or go home right?

    Well life happens (bought a condo) and as I built the kit, the DIY speaker bug caught on and I now want to build an HT system for my new condo! The room that it will be in is approximately 11' by 12' with 8 foot ceilings so I would classify it as a small room by HT standards. Here is so far what I have planned:

    FL/FR: HIVI DIY 3-way kit (Swans M3 clones)
    Center: MTM design with 2xL5-8R drivers and a RT1.3WE tweeter
    Surrounds: Nothing set in stone yet, would probably want L5-8R drivers or I was actually thinking of maybe just doing a set of Overnight Sensations (any thoughts???)
    Subwoofer: Either purchase an SVS or a DIY if I feel confident enough

  • #2
    Sounds like you have most of this all laid out. Have a budget for your sub? I'm sure a DIY will fir the bill.
    Have fun!
    Wolf
    "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
    "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
    "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
    "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

    *InDIYana event website*

    Photobucket pages:
    http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

    My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
    http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

    Comment


    • #3
      Part 1: Unpacking the HIVI DIY3.1 kit

      I wanted this so badly that I ordered the kit from Amazon shipped it to the border and drove down (3 hour round trip) to pick it up. Shipping fees for anything in general is pretty exorbitant in Canada, add that to the duties and taxes for items purchased through the US... The packaging for the kit was top notch as to be expected from my previous HIVI/Swans purchases and overall the kit weighed close to 30 KG!

      Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20180803_000319.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	51.9 KB
ID:	1409362
      The kit came with a 2 sets of each driver: L6-4R Woofer, DMN-B mid and RT1.3-B ribbon tweeters. It also came with the crossover components, the flat pack MDF cabinets and other accessories (speaker grills, ports, terminal cup and etc.) Each of these components were packaged individually in boxes and within the boxes in plastic bags.

      Click image for larger version

Name:	download_20190410_113821.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	220.9 KB
ID:	1409363

      One of my fears was the packaging of the flat pack MDF boards as the corners of MDF can easily be damaged during shipping but it was packaged nicely and they came out in perfect condition!

      Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20180805_221514.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	146.5 KB
ID:	1409364

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Wolf View Post
        Sounds like you have most of this all laid out. Have a budget for your sub? I'm sure a DIY will fir the bill.
        Have fun!
        Wolf
        I'm looking at around $300 USD all in (plate cabinet and woofer). Any suggestions? As I said room size is fairly small at 11' by 12' give or take on the second floor of a condo.

        Comment


        • #5
          In case you missed it, Scott Sehlin did some great work on the stock crossover in that HiVi kit that flattens out the rising response.
          It's been a pretty cold winter, which has delayed some planned projects.  This situation has presented an opportunity to dig further into the HiVi DIY 3.1's that I picked up shortly before DIY Iowa in 2017 and brought along for a quick demo.  My pair painstakingly finished in primer for the show,is shown here.This kit is still available on Amazon for $249/pair including knockdown cabinets with free shipping.  Some of the reviews indicate that the overall sound is a bit bright, but can be corrected by increasing mid and tweeter resistor values.  Rich (Turn 2) had done this to a pair that he also brought to the Iowa show, but a wiring error led to some strain on the mids - so we stopped the demo early.  Rich indicated that he had modified the resistor values.
          Co-conspirator in the development of the "CR Gnarly Fidelity Reduction Unit" - Registered Trademark, Patent Pending.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by tom_s View Post
            In case you missed it, Scott Sehlin did some great work on the stock crossover in that HiVi kit that flattens out the rising response.
            Hey Tom, I did use one of the crossover modifications that Scott has suggested, more on that later!

            Comment


            • #7
              Just saw the recent flash sale on PE... What are your opinions on pairing the cabinets (0.23 ft^2) with the L5-8Rs + some tweeter for surround use? This option vs the overnight sensations? I plugged in the driver parameters into WinICD and it seems the cabinet is a little small (Qtc = 0.985) but one possible pro I see is timbre matching speakers. Any thoughts?

              Comment


              • #8
                Part 2: Assembling the cabinets

                The next step I did was assemble the cabinets. After some internet research I found the best way to assemble the mitered boxes was to use the box tape method (or in my case painters tape).

                Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_20180805_235532.jpg Views:	1 Size:	145.0 KB ID:	1409864
                This method involves running the tape along the edges prior to assembling the cabinet, this allows for better alignment of the mitered joints with ease. To start I only assembled the sides of the cabinets which allows the focus on aligning not everything at once and also so that I can have more room to insulate the cabinet. Note: Before gluing the cabinet together ALWAYS do a dry run to make sure everything fits!

                Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_20180806_212648.jpg Views:	1 Size:	211.1 KB ID:	1409865
                After a dry run, it was now time to actually assemble the cabinets with glue. I used Lepage carpenter's glue but Titebond would work as well. In hindsight I probably would use Titebond III as it gives extra work time to assemble the cabinets. Otherwise it definitely helps to have a second hand for assembly! Even with the tape and glue, you still need clamps to hold everything together nice and tightly while the glue dries. To do this I bought some box straps that can be bought a pair of ratcheting band clamps which are used specifically for this purpose. The once I purchased were about $7/each (lower with a coupon) from Harbor Freight: https://www.harborfreight.com/1-inch...amp-66220.html

                Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_20180806_220343_1.jpg Views:	1 Size:	141.9 KB ID:	1409866
                I don't have a photo, but additional clamps were used on the middle section of each corner... You can never have too much clamps. After a day of drying, the clamps and tape were removed and the miter joints came out beautifully with very few noticeable gaps.

                Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_20180807_211853.jpg Views:	1 Size:	157.2 KB ID:	1409867
                There is some conflicting arguments online but the kit came with some foam that was at the very top of the box which was either just packaging foam or supposed to be dampening foam for the cabinets. Out of pure excitement, silly me threw it away when I unpacked the kit upon arrival... To substitute this I bought some recycled denim insulation which apparently is a good alternative to fill cabinets. One pack of this insulation was the perfect amount to line both cabinets top to bottom. To attach it to the cabinets, I used some spray can glue.

                Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_20180807_233418.jpg Views:	1 Size:	138.5 KB ID:	1409868
                Lastly, I glued the top and bottom together, strapped it down, and called it a day.

                Stay tuned...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by thewongster View Post
                  Part 2: Assembling the cabinets

                  Harbor Freight: https://www.harborfreight.com/1-inch...amp-66220.html

                  Stay tuned...
                  Hope your using a square when setting up the cab.'s. The HF straps don't guarantee 90o Joints on there own (been there, done that).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Millstonemike View Post

                    Hope your using a square when setting up the cab.'s. The HF straps don't guarantee 90o Joints on there own (been there, done that).
                    I didn't use a square actually. I hadn't thought of that... It ended up coming out square because of the middle bracing which help square the box, but that is a good point. I was just lucky!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Alright so I went ahead and purchased the knock down cabinets from last sale... They have a volume of 6.5L. I did a simulation with winISD (first time using!) and here is what I get for a sealed cabinet using the HIVI L5-8R:

                      Click image for larger version

Name:	speaker.png
Views:	1
Size:	68.2 KB
ID:	1410068

                      So I'm interpreting that I am getting a F3 of 70Hz and calculations of Fsc = 88.55 and Qtc = 0.985. For use as a rear surround would this be okay? From some reading, convention says that a Qtc of about .707 is what people strive for so,having said that is my calculated Qtc too high? What would be the implications?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well off hand, I'd say the response looks good for surrounds as they don't need much bass at all. The majority of the bass will come from the front and sub.
                        Break in period = The time it takes for the new speakers to break in. And the time it takes for you ears to get adjusted to the new speakers.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Your boxes are somewhat small (though, again, for surrounds it's not that critical).
                          I would fully stuff them with polyfill.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Chris Roemer View Post
                            Your boxes are somewhat small (though, again, for surrounds it's not that critical).
                            I would fully stuff them with polyfill.
                            That's the plan, I was thinking of using denim insulation like what I did the with bookshelf. Would you happen to have any experience with that? I have't been able to find much of a comparison between polyfill vs denim and it's effects.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Part 3: Cutting the oak outer shell for the cabinets

                              The kit originally came with a black wood grain laminate that could be used to encase the cabinet. After looking at some photos and reading some reviews I decided that I would not use this as I felt like this veneer wouldn't do the system justice. Also I felt the laminate lacked a sort of warmth (ie. color). In the end what I decided to do was use to encase the cabinets in a 1/4" layer of red oak.

                              Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20180811_233929.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	252.7 KB
ID:	1410607

                              Up until this point I had not decided what type of finish I would apply to the oak but the beauty of using red oak is that it absorbs most stains and top coats fairly well so I had a variety of options when the time would come. I bought the wood at my local store and fortunately they were dressed on all sides so little prep work was required. Joining the oak planks were fairly easy but did require time and lots of clamps.

                              Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20180814_232428.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	191.9 KB
ID:	1410608
                              As I wanted the oak outer shell to really pop out and I also wanted to challenge myself, I decided to use miter joints for the oak aswell. I didn't have a table saw so I had to use a router with a chamfer bit. After a few trial pieces, I was able to get a nice miter joint on each of the oak sides.

                              Click image for larger version

Name:	40062134_2086891334663790_7331639736982831104_n.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	772.0 KB
ID:	1410609

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X