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Soldering xo change sound?

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  • #31
    Just because...

    *EXPERT LEVEL* Solder Splice Tutorial TTC Avionics - YouTube

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Mountainman Bob View Post
      think of a vehicle going along at speed on good pavement then hitting a patch of unpaved rough gravel for 50yds or so then back to pavement......the vehicle will be upset by this.
      That would be a good analogy, if electron waves traveled at the speed of sound. At their actual speed a better analogy would be if the patch of gravel was 5 inches wide, and the car was traveling at 5000 miles per hour.

      www.billfitzmaurice.com
      www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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      • #33
        That is a lineman’s splice. Most of our splices should just be Bell splices.

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        • #34
          There is no "best" brand of 63/37 solder. It is an alloy. It's appeal is that it is eutectic. If you are worried about conductivity in a soldered joint in a crossover, you are doing it wrong.
          Don't listen to me - I have not sold any $150,000 speakers.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by johnnyrichards View Post
            There is no "best" brand of 63/37 solder. It is an alloy. It's appeal is that it is eutectic. If you are worried about conductivity in a soldered joint in a crossover, you are doing it wrong.
            A good solder joint with just about any solder won't have an effect on sound. A pair of needle nose (or other pliers) with a strong rubber band around the handle makes a good heat sink while soldering.

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            • #36
              You guys are scaring away the pixie-dust fairies and magic unicorns with all this science talk. Just sayin'...
              Francis

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Millstonemike View Post

                A good solder joint with just about any solder won't have an effect on sound. A pair of needle nose (or other pliers) with a strong rubber band around the handle makes a good heat sink while soldering.
                A pair of hemostats, alligator clip on the end of a clip lead or even a binder clip will work as a heat sink. But done quickly and properly with large scale crossover components a heat sink shouldn't be needed. I don't remember the last time I used a heat sink.

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                • #38
                  I've never damaged a component on a crossover while soldering because I didn't use a heat sink on a lead, although I have burnt the outer part of a capacitor or two by carelessness.
                  Paul

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Paul K. View Post
                    I've never damaged a component on a crossover while soldering because I didn't use a heat sink on a lead, although I have burnt the outer part of a capacitor or two by carelessness.
                    Paul
                    Yes. Also, make sure you scrape away the lacquer at the end of your inductor leads.

                    As far as the other questions here - as is always the case, if solder did make a difference, it wouldn't be a difference worth worrying about compared to other issues in speaker design.

                    Has anyone ever run a sweep on a crossover network by itself? How would you do that?

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                    • #40
                      If your prototype crossover was put together with a bunch of these alligator test leads: https://www.parts-express.com/small-...pcs--360-150#! and then you replaced them with good solder connections.... I could buy that the sound changed. Someone measured the resistance of those cheesy test leads and it was something like 0.4 Ohms!
                      Craig

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                      • #41
                        Yeah, I have some cheap test leads that can have about an ohm, depending on how the clip is attached. Caveat emptor and all that.
                        Francis

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                        • #42
                          It's easy enough to fix the crimped wire in those inexpensive test leads; scoot the plastic cover backwards off the alligator clip and solder the crimp joint (and you don't have to use a heat sink when doing so ).
                          Paul

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Paul K. View Post
                            It's easy enough to fix the crimped wire in those inexpensive test leads; scoot the plastic cover backwards off the alligator clip and solder the crimp joint (and you don't have to use a heat sink when doing so ).
                            Paul
                            I'l try that, thanks.
                            Francis

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                            • #44
                              You're welcome. I discovered this problem, too, a long time ago when making low-level voltage measurements (millivolts); the darned voltage never measured the same twice after fiddling with those clip leads.

                              Originally posted by fpitas View Post

                              I'l try that, thanks.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by johnnyrichards View Post
                                There is no "best" brand of 63/37 solder. It is an alloy. It's appeal is that it is eutectic.
                                Not all solder is the same, but the brand isn't super important, I'd recommend Kester or Alpha personally. Differences in solder are with the type of flux and how much is in it.

                                From experience in commercial electronics production line in my younger years, I use this roll for soldering, it has a mild flux that doesn't need to be cleaned up.

                                Click image for larger version

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                                Then this roll for tinning your iron tip when you're done, and for any dirty or oxidized connections. This has a much more aggressive flux, and should be cleaned with alcohol, as the flux is slightly corrosive and can cause problems when left on the solder joint for years.

                                Click image for larger version

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                                "Lead-free" is a whole different ball game, I would say avoid it if you can, keep buying eutectic solder as long as it's still available. Lead free needs a higher temperature, which causes your iron to oxidize faster, needs you to avoid using a wet sponge to clean your tip (cools off iron too fast), so in general its just a big pain and doesn't improve anything. All the problems with Lead-free apply to that fancy "silver solder" as well.
                                "I just use off the shelf textbook filters designed for a resistor of 8 ohms with
                                exactly a Fc 3K for both drivers, anybody can do it." -Xmax

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