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Speaker wire

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  • Originally posted by Mountainman Bob View Post

    Thats kindly what the google results were, couple things said it’s quite hard to eliminate resonance......you just move it up or down in freq.

    Saw something about bracing the backside of the magnet to curb front to back motion?
    A sub will not resonate a box too much as the wavelengths in a sub are longer than the panels. The issue is the sides flexing due to pressure which isn't exactly resonance IMO.

    I should say most sub boxes as some might have panels big enough to resonate

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    • Originally posted by killa View Post

      A sub will not resonate a box too much as the wavelengths in a sub are longer than the panels. The issue is the sides flexing due to pressure which isn't exactly resonance IMO.

      I should say most sub boxes as some might have panels big enough to resonate
      The sides can resonate at harmonics of the sub frequencies. In any event bracing is the solution.
      Francis

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      • Originally posted by Pete Schumacher View Post

        As I stated, they lay flat and look great. That’s why I like them.

        If you’re serious about hearing a difference then prove it to yourself with blind evaluations. Otherwise it’s an exercise in futility.

        High dollar speaker cables like the Verastarr are made as works of art. Art isn’t cheap. High purity copper conductor wrapped up all pretty costs money. If you’ve spent big bux on a system and you have the cash, get what’s nice to you.

        I’m not going to attempt to tout the superiority of these cables over regular cheap wire. I don’t really care.
        Would I have bought them myself? Probably not. Too expensive. But I wanted a set of cables after I saw them the first time. In many cases we buy with our eyes.
        In that case I need some of those rattlesnakes.......certainly keep the grandkids from poking around back there if they knew that’s where the pet rattlesnakes lived!

        Have you ever removed them to a/b with ‘cheap’ yourself?

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        • Originally posted by killa View Post
          When people say "fast" or "slow" they are talking about transient response not tempo. The tempo or speed of the sound only changes due to the source changing it. It will not change from the source to the speaker unless you hear at the speed of electricity.
          Ok.....well now we’re making progress.
          After a quick search I see that losing the transient peak can sound flabby or Slow!
          and if transient response is indeed something that can change with speaker wire (especially ‘cheap’ wire) then this would explain what I’m hearing....no?
          Maybe I’m not as crazy as y’all think! (wide open there!) lol

          can transient response be measured easily?

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          • Originally posted by fpitas View Post

            Biamping is active. And yes, you can use a different amp for the tweeter. In the case of a horn though, with a normal class AB amp I'd still use a substantial pad to get the amp working in its normal range, up out of the noise floor and crossover distortion.
            Yah.....I’ve always found the sweet spot on my amps to be around 1 o’clock.....it just something that crossed the mind, if I don’t address these crossing thoughts they usually fall back into the abyss!

            The more I think about active the more I like it, there is a lot of dsp function on the Yamaha I bought last yr and some I really like and some of the functions resembled turd. What it does do is have 8db of dsp reduction on each of its four channels (A+B). This would allow removal of an lpad (as long as you don’t need more than -8db) without messing anything up. I do realize that’s not really ‘bi-amping’ though.

            Does your behringer function as a dsp Xo?

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            • Originally posted by fpitas View Post

              The sides can resonate at harmonics of the sub frequencies. In any event bracing is the solution.
              The design I’m using doesn’t really lend itself to bracing but I’m sure I can come up with something.....I’ll see if I can’t figure out how to add a link!

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              • Originally posted by Mountainman Bob View Post

                Yah.....I’ve always found the sweet spot on my amps to be around 1 o’clock.....it just something that crossed the mind, if I don’t address these crossing thoughts they usually fall back into the abyss!

                The more I think about active the more I like it, there is a lot of dsp function on the Yamaha I bought last yr and some I really like and some of the functions resembled turd. What it does do is have 8db of dsp reduction on each of its four channels (A+B). This would allow removal of an lpad (as long as you don’t need more than -8db) without messing anything up. I do realize that’s not really ‘bi-amping’ though.

                Does your behringer function as a dsp Xo?
                Yes, that's what a DCX2496 is, a DSP loudspeaker management box. It's stereo and has three outputs per channel, balanced pro-level line inputs and outputs.
                Francis

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                • I've played a lot with bi/tri/quad amp DSP stuff

                  - Vanilla Mini DSP 2x4
                  - NanoDigi 2x8
                  - Linux PC realtime processing with every imaginable dsp plugin under the sun.

                  I will throw this caution out there.

                  You will either need to "set it and forget it."

                  or...Spend the entirety of your listening experience monkeying around with settings. Tweaking every piece of music to optimize your system for differences in mastering and sound (sometimes within individual tracks on an album.) As soon as it sounds "perfect" on one piece, the album is over, and the next album doesn't sound right. Start over.

                  These things are pretty much infinitely adjustable. Gain, XO points, XO slopes, multiple bands of parametric EQ on each channel, delay on each channel, and more.

                  If you are having issues with the sound of speaker wire, stay away from this route.


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