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Speaker wire

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  • Originally posted by billfitzmaurice View Post
    Higher resistance results in lower current draw and less heat. Also lower volume from the speaker due to the insertion loss, but no amp is going into protect mode on account of that.
    These threads are out of control, thanks for the sanity check Bill.

    Comment


    • It may be audible. The OP indicated he was using soldered connections so flux and heat should have done a decent job cleaning it up at the connection.

      Most of the time people ascribe sound qualities reflective of what they observe with their eyes. But it is entirely possible that if the wire sounded different (not agreeing to that), that some people would prefer the corroded copper in blind testing.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by devnull View Post

        That's an understatement. I've been playing with and measuring the midrange and high frequency horns that I got. Little changes in the crossovers make HUGE differences. A few more hours of playing might just convince me to go active.
        One thing about going active, I've found higher order crossovers are best for my setup. The horn (and midrange cones) are 4th order acoustic. The imaging was kind of odd with lower order crossovers. Higher orders are much easier with active.
        Francis

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        • I had some old speaker wire turning green under the clear jacket. I replaced with new. It looks a lot better now. The 4 conductor cables for my LXminis are opaque white over multicolor conductors. Lord knows what's going on under that.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by philthien View Post
            It may be audible. The OP indicated he was using soldered connections so flux and heat should have done a decent job cleaning it up at the connection.

            Most of the time people ascribe sound qualities reflective of what they observe with their eyes. But it is entirely possible that if the wire sounded different (not agreeing to that), that some people would prefer the corroded copper in blind testing.
            I probably missed it but I thought in the original thread he was talking about soldered xo connections. I assumed he had normal connections for the speaker wire. That said, I work on service trucks for a living and have seen some wire that gets oxidized all the way through and causes all kinds of issues even though the end terminations looked fine.

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            • sorry craigk, but the others are correct. high resistance will not cause an amp to go into thermal overload; it's just the opposite, just like Bill said. Please re-think it through, as it will only benefit you to understand that scenario better.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by billfitzmaurice View Post
                Higher resistance results in lower current draw and less heat. Also lower volume from the speaker due to the insertion loss, but no amp is going into protect mode on account of that.
                Bill is on the money with this one......new wires gave more volume and a warmer amp.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by philthien View Post
                  It may be audible. The OP indicated he was using soldered connections so flux and heat should have done a decent job cleaning it up at the connection.

                  Most of the time people ascribe sound qualities reflective of what they observe with their eyes. But it is entirely possible that if the wire sounded different (not agreeing to that), that some people would prefer the corroded copper in blind testing.
                  Was soldered but is now back to wire nuts on xo and 3 ways/raw wire on amp.

                  The sound was just that, a difference in sound....or lack of in this case.

                  i did Not see the wire then hear a difference, I heard a difference and then looked for a problem. The sound difference occurred right after soldering a different inductor in/ then out/ then old one back in. I questioned the solder joint as the problem......mayhem ensued.

                  I removed all solder joints to see if that really was the problem (back to wire nuts) now by y’alls reasoning that should have fixed my pseudo problem.......it did not.

                  i then saw the oxidized wire and thought well that might be the cause......I researched it a little and found no collaborative info, then I saw where disturbing a highly oxidized wire can cause issues. Asked about here....not much.

                  changed the wire.....voila, magic back.

                  hopefully wogg will be able to put some numbers on it as I’m sending him the wires to test.

                  whew.....



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                  • I am curious how this test will turn out as I have seen oxidized/corroded wires cause issues many times. It wouldn't surprise me if there was added resistance caused by that wire.

                    Comment


                    • Yeah but you said you soldered the connections and then noticed a change in sound. After much back and forth you concluded the wire was oxidized.

                      But unless that wire flash-oxidized, something doesn’t add-up.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by philthien View Post
                        Yeah but you said you soldered the connections and then noticed a change in sound. After much back and forth you concluded the wire was oxidized.

                        But unless that wire flash-oxidized, something doesn’t add-up.
                        If y’all want to play the part of contrarians please at least try to read my posts........i’m spending a lot of time to get as much detail across as possible.

                        see post #112 above where I make the comment “then I saw where disturbing highly oxidized wires can cause issue”

                        i’ve Also mentioned several times in other detailed explanations that I believed when I coiled up the wires while I soldered that might be the disturbance in question.

                        Come on folks......

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                        • Originally posted by philthien View Post

                          Were you schooled in bias? Because until you've somehow blinded yourself and isolated your variable, your ability to see the DUT means what you hear is influenced by what you see (and know).

                          I'm pretty sure the oxidized wire would have sounded exactly like new cord, in a true double-blind test.
                          After wogg hangs some numbers up, I’ll pay to have it shipped to you for blind testing although I’m beginning to question the bias against me.

                          Seems as though many have a problem with the fact that someone could have enough control over their grey matter to make a unbiased decision when faced with a decision.....I call it abductive reasoning.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by fpitas View Post

                            I don't disagree. I do everything I can think of that is within reason. For example, I replaced all the coupling caps in my DCX2496 with Nichicon Muse bipolars. Did it make a difference? Maybe. But it only cost about $5. I use screw-down terminals for speaker connections. They cost about 5 cents each. My system is active, and line-level signals are balanced throughout. So I guess I'm willing to do everything I can as long as it's not too costly, and makes technical sense.
                            If you go to AVAHIFI.COM, under resources you can download "Audio Basics" a newsletter that was published for about 12 years by Frank VanAlstine. He is a former Dynaco engineer who left the company and went out on his own selling electronics mostly. He still does, and his products are quite well regarded. Anyway, I mention this just to say he is a qualified engineer.
                            The newsletter, while sometimes extolling the virtue of his own products, also discusses audio myths in many places trying to debunk the junk. I found it often to be a hysterically funny read, and good information. A number of tweaks are discussed throughout the series, and they make sense. For instance, damping unwanted vibrations in cabinets and on frames of drivers.
                            He is still selling equipment, some of which are tweaks. He sells a modified Grado cartridge and I have little doubt about his claims for it, but I no longer do vinyl. I did have one at one time.
                            Audio Basics very much parallels Rod Elliott's articles that were referenced here, but in a less technical way.

                            Steve

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by skatz View Post

                              If you go to AVAHIFI.COM, under resources you can download "Audio Basics" a newsletter that was published for about 12 years by Frank VanAlstine. He is a former Dynaco engineer who left the company and went out on his own selling electronics mostly. He still does, and his products are quite well regarded. Anyway, I mention this just to say he is a qualified engineer.
                              The newsletter, while sometimes extolling the virtue of his own products, also discusses audio myths in many places trying to debunk the junk. I found it often to be a hysterically funny read, and good information. A number of tweaks are discussed throughout the series, and they make sense. For instance, damping unwanted vibrations in cabinets and on frames of drivers.
                              He is still selling equipment, some of which are tweaks. He sells a modified Grado cartridge and I have little doubt about his claims for it, but I no longer do vinyl. I did have one at one time.
                              Audio Basics very much parallels Rod Elliott's articles that were referenced here, but in a less technical way.
                              Thanks! I'll take a look.
                              Francis

                              Comment


                              • This is a little strange. I posted the comment that Francis quotes above, then went back to add my name to the post. I then got a message that it was being flagged as spam, and the message would not be visible until someone clears it.
                                So, at the moment, I can see Francis' response to my post but not the post itself except in his quote!

                                Steve

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