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integrating a single subwoofer with two speakers - phase question

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  • integrating a single subwoofer with two speakers - phase question

    Someone was asking about integrating a subwoofer on an audio forum and something occured to me, If you are using just one subwoofer and you are trying to integrate it with two speakers, but the subwoofer is not at an equal distance to both speakers. Surely it would be possible that the subwoofer could be in phase with one speaker, but not with the other? or am I missing something?

  • #2
    Not an expert but I think the wavelengths are so long it doesn't matter. Room nodes (placement of subwoofer) certainly come into play. Others more knowledgeable will certainly chime in.

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    • #3
      I did wonder about the wavelengths.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by fatmarley View Post
        Surely it would be possible that the subwoofer could be in phase with one speaker, but not with the other?
        Yes, if the distance to listener differential between the sub and one speaker versus the other is a half wavelength. Since a half wavelength at 80Hz is seven feet that's an unlikely scenario. What's far more likely, common for that matter, is to have uneven response around the room from boundary reflection nulls. The cure for that is to have at least two subs, on opposite ends of the room.
        www.billfitzmaurice.com
        www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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        • #5
          Originally posted by billfitzmaurice View Post
          Yes, if the distance to listener differential between the sub and one speaker versus the other is a half wavelength. Since a half wavelength at 80Hz is seven feet that's an unlikely scenario. What's far more likely, common for that matter, is to have uneven response around the room from boundary reflection nulls. The cure for that is to have at least two subs, on opposite ends of the room.
          Thanks Bill. That makes sense.

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          • #6
            The way I do it: Invert polarity of sub and move distance timing on receiver of sub till is has the least output overall with a test tone, then invert polarity again and it should be averaged pretty well.

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            • #7
              Here's an expensive way to do it.

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ck-f...x0A5rG&index=4

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