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One subwoofer, two horns

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  • One subwoofer, two horns

    Regarding this photo on the reviews for Dayton Audio RSS390HF-4 15" Reference HF Subwoofer 4 Ohm. https://www.parts-express.com/dayton...4-ohm--295-468

    Is it a bad idea to take this front loaded horn design with one 15" subwoofer, flatten it out, hang it on the ceiling -- or in the attic -- then run two 14' horns from the single subwoofer to front and rear of the room?

    Or is it better to have two boxed speakers like this photo?

    I'd be aiming for a frequency range between 20-60hz. I don't play loud music. I just want the frequency range.

  • #2
    Flatten it out? What do you mean?

    You're gonna have a real hard time getting 20Hz from a FLH, me thinks. Have you seen an actual FR graph for that specific alignment you posted up?
    Last edited by guitar maestro; 05-18-2019, 09:00 PM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by bradley.s View Post
      Is it a bad idea to take this front loaded horn design with one 15" subwoofer, flatten it out, hang it on the ceiling -- or in the attic -- then run two 14' horns from the single subwoofer to front and rear of the room?
      It's a really bad idea. It seems that you want to reinvent the wheel, but I can assure you that no matter how hard you try it will always turn out round. If you don't want it loud you don't want a horn. Reaching 20Hz is infinitely easier, not to mention a lot smaller, with a low tuned bass reflex.
      www.billfitzmaurice.com
      www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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      • #4
        I should have said, "unfold the horn," but I said flatten it out instead. Which was confusing. The intent is to place multiple subwoofers where they don't interrupt floor space. But, there's a lot of room up there so I thought one sub with horns extended to opposite ends of the room might do the trick.

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        • #5
          How do you intend to get two horn when there is only one in that FLH?

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          • #6
            Yes, you should build two enormous bass horns in your attic that extend to your listening room below.

            Absolutely yes.

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            • #7
              Attic was my first thought as well, but then I remembered speaker designers frequently say their designs are intended to prevent ceiling reflections. The horns don't seem that big when they're unfolded so I thought they might help with ceiling refraction without intruding into the room too much. Or might not.

              Large subwoofer cabinets will always take up floor space even if you dress them up to look like furniture. And they'd really start to infringe on the room as you keep adding them.

              Another problem I've read about sub cabinets is you need to isolate them from the floor. It might be easier to isolate them by hanging them. Or maybe isolation isn't as important as I've read.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by guitar maestro View Post
                How do you intend to get two horn when there is only one in that FLH?
                What does FLH mean; folded long horn?
                Last edited by bradley.s; 05-19-2019, 10:48 AM. Reason: Ah, maybe it means front loaded horn. I was thinking of running two horns heading out in opposite directions. But I imagine you could run as many as you wanted. I don't need loud music so I'd be split

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by bradley.s View Post

                  What does FLH mean; folded long horn?
                  Yes, front loaded horn. And no, you simply can't run "as many as you want".




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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bradley.s View Post
                    Attic was my first thought as well, but then I remembered speaker designers frequently say their designs are intended to prevent ceiling reflections.
                    With subs that's impossible. Their output is omnidirectional.

                    Another problem I've read about sub cabinets is you need to isolate them from the floor.
                    Audiophile myth. What's interesting about audiophiles is that the more money they spend on their toys the less likely they are to have any understanding about how sound reproduction works. If they did know how sound reproduction works they wouldn't waste their money on useless junk, like speaker isolation devices. They certainly don't spend much time reading useful technical documents, like this: http://ethanwiner.com/speaker_isolation.htm


                    www.billfitzmaurice.com
                    www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by billfitzmaurice View Post
                      With subs that's impossible. Their output is omnidirectional.

                      Audiophile myth. What's interesting about audiophiles is that the more money they spend on their toys the less likely they are to have any understanding about how sound reproduction works. If they did know how sound reproduction works they wouldn't waste their money on useless junk, like speaker isolation devices. They certainly don't spend much time reading useful technical documents, like this: http://ethanwiner.com/speaker_isolation.htm

                      I'm introducing compressed tanks of AudiophileAir, a complete atmosphere replacement for high-end listening rooms later this year.

                      You're going to crap all over that, aren't you?

                      Oh well, onto my Shrodinger Audiophile cables, which are immeasurably better than any other cable out there.

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                      • #12
                        Apparently, midrange frequencies reflect off the ceiling. The subwoofer horns would help break up a flat ceiling surface for the mids. If ceiling reflections actually matter.

                        Good to know floor isolation isn't a problem. The original source I read on floor isolation mentioned Auralex. I'll put it in the audiophile myth file.

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                        • #13
                          These sirens use multiple horn designs with one driver. Why is that a problem?

                          My intuition could be wrong, however, I think one driver with multiple horns could be an advantage because it might equalize pressure between opposite ends of the room through the horn. Though I'd guess you'd want the two horns to be equal length.

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                          • #14
                            You aren't wrong, but you're not exactly right either. Those designs are intended to increase the dispersion angle of mids and highs. Since the dispersion angle of a subwoofer, horn loaded or otherwise, is 360 degrees it can't be increased.
                            www.billfitzmaurice.com
                            www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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                            • #15
                              In a subwoofer system isn't the concern dispersion points within the room rather than angle? As far as I understand, you want to position one or multiple subwoofers to smooth out the pressure.

                              The parts express subwoofer guide says horns offer good dispersion control. Therefore, the horns might be just as good as running multiple subs. https://www.parts-express.com/resour...wtoguide-index

                              The guide says horn size is a disadvantage but maybe that becomes an advantage on the ceiling because they're breaking up a large flat surface that causes problems for midranges.

                              Granted, commercial manufacturers would have an impossible time selling them to the public but the advantage of DIY is you don't need to sell your system to a mass market. In terms of material and complexity, an unrolled horn wouldn't be any more expensive than a folded design. So it's a question of whether or not a horn is an advantage.

                              One possible advantage of horns in addition to locating dispersion is increased loudness. You would have more flexibility to dial the 60hz range down with an equalizer. That seems better to me than trying to increase the 20hz range with an equalizer.

                              Anyway, I was just trying to think it through and see if multiple horns can be better than multiple subs in a room.

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