Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How do we define "tone"?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How do we define "tone"?

    It's easy to discuss things like sensitivity or frequency response, but 'tone' seems to be something important that I don't know how to quantify. ???????????

  • #2
    The slope if the frequency response determines the tone. "Flat" is a description of tone.
    "I just use off the shelf textbook filters designed for a resistor of 8 ohms with
    exactly a Fc 3K for both drivers, anybody can do it." -Xmax

    Comment


    • #3
      For me tone equals pitch.....Like Wood tones, metallic tones, plastic tones, cloth tone....Makes one wonder why most instruments are made of wood and not plastic. lol

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by scary View Post
        It's easy to discuss things like sensitivity or frequency response, but 'tone' seems to be something important that I don't know how to quantify. ???????????
        This is true of almost all audiophile words used to describe sound which tend to have associations and an imprecise meaning that varies from audiophile to audiophile. In technical publications the term timbre is normally used to describe the character of sound that is not pitch or loudness. This is an unambiguous term and might be what is meant by tone depending on context and who is using it. Of course they might also be seeking to refer to an aspect of timbre in which case you would have to ask what.

        Personally I see little alternative but to accept that subjective descriptions of sound using nontechnical terms is going to be vague and imprecise. Dictionaries of audiophile words like this one might help in some circumstances but you can never rely on an audiophile word meaning the same thing to everybody.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Unbiasedsound View Post
          For me tone equals pitch.....Like Wood tones, metallic tones, plastic tones, cloth tone....Makes one wonder why most instruments are made of wood and not plastic. lol
          I have a carbon fiber rainsong guitar that sounds just as good as any wood acoustic I have tried. I actually like it better than any wooden acoustic. It is has a very clear tone that is rich but without the woody tone of most acoustics.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by scary View Post
            'tone' seems to be something important that I don't know how to quantify.
            Tone is simply the accentuation and/or attenuation of different frequencies with a pro-sound speaker, such as those used for electric guitar or bass. Those speakers don't just reproduce sound, they're part and parcel of the instrument, so they're often configured to add significant coloration. For instance, bright usually applies to a speaker with a prominent high end, warm to one with prominent mids, dark to one with muted highs and mids, boomy one with a midbass hump. Where any other speakers are concerned there should be no tone per se, as coloration is distortion of the original content.

            www.billfitzmaurice.com
            www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

            Comment


            • #7
              I wonder if the OP is referring to "tone" meaning different harmonic content? For example, "C" played on a violin sounds different than the same pitch played on another instrument like a piano, flute, or horn etc. due to the different harmonic content of each instrument.

              Comment


              • #8
                Click image for larger version

Name:	rt_113581_01.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	51.2 KB
ID:	1414409
                "I just use off the shelf textbook filters designed for a resistor of 8 ohms with
                exactly a Fc 3K for both drivers, anybody can do it." -Xmax

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by dcibel View Post
                  The slope if the frequency response determines the tone. "Flat" is a description of tone.
                  If the subject is designing hi-fi speakers, that's the answer I'd agree with. But I'm not exactly sure what the OP is asking. And if tone is some new audiophile buzzword, it's ironic that tone controls are passe.
                  Francis

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dcibel View Post
                    Click image for larger version

Name:	rt_113581_01.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	51.2 KB
ID:	1414409
                    Mine go to eleven.
                    www.billfitzmaurice.com
                    www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      We'll have to come up with new tone controls that have unicorns and rainbows. Audiophile grade, so they sell for thousands of dollars.
                      Francis

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Tone can be used to describe the note (pitch) or frequency being played, or possibly the timbre.

                        If we assume the latter - then the waveform plus harmonics differentiates one instrument from a another or a machine or a human when playing the same note (same pitch). an Oscilloscope can be used to differentiate waveform and various PC based measurement systems used to measure harmonics.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by fpitas View Post
                          We'll have to come up with new tone controls that have unicorns and rainbows. Audiophile grade, so they sell for thousands of dollars.
                          http://bobbyowsinski.blogspot.com/20...lume-knob.html
                          www.billfitzmaurice.com
                          www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Oh my. You really can't mock it. The audiophiles always do one better.
                            Francis

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If only that was the nuttiest audiophile tweak I've ever seen, but it doesn't even come close.
                              www.billfitzmaurice.com
                              www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X