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Isetta with a recessed front?

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  • Isetta with a recessed front?

    Paul Carmody's design has the Isetta speaker drivers flush mounted right up front, with nothing around them except flat wood. In my last build I recessed a couple of Scott Senlin's Helium Micromonitors and put a grill in front of them. I think they sound great, but Scott might not agree, lol. So before I jump into my next build and go changing things to suit my own design sensibilities, I thought I'd ask: is that a bad idea? Would that alter the sound horribly? What are some alternatives that would still allow me to make it look good? Thanks!

    What Paul's Isetta looks like: https://i.imgur.com/xhuJgTe.jpg

    What I'm thinking of (rough cad image): https://i.imgur.com/TRZUYqe.png

    Oh, and here's what I mean by "looks good": https://i.imgur.com/KjEdxVZ.jpg

  • #2
    Being it's a boombox, critical listening and diffraction are less of a concern. However, changing a design from intention is always a gamble unless you follow up with measurements.
    You would likely be okay, but don't blame the designer if something doesn't sound right.

    Later,
    Wolf
    "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
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    • #3
      Originally posted by Wolf View Post
      Being it's a boombox, critical listening and diffraction are less of a concern. However, changing a design from intention is always a gamble unless you follow up with measurements.
      You would likely be okay, but don't blame the designer if something doesn't sound right.

      Later,
      Wolf
      I totally agree. It likely may have no audible impact for you. But like Wolf said, it's not "per design" so proceed knowing that.
      Craig

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      • #4
        Try to keep the recess as shallow as possible, is a 1/4" possible?

        Try to use roundovers where possible to avoid sharp edges and the resulting diffraction. Can you roundover the inside edge of the grill frame so that the first edges the sound waves encounter are rounded?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by a4eaudio View Post
          Try to keep the recess as shallow as possible, is a 1/4" possible?

          Try to use roundovers where possible to avoid sharp edges and the resulting diffraction. Can you roundover the inside edge of the grill frame so that the first edges the sound waves encounter are rounded?
          If the OP doesn't have a router to to create the roundover, he could use quarter round molding - Example below. But the smallest I've ever seen is 1/2" ...

          Click image for larger version

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          • #6
            DO IT

            there's not a lot of room on the sides of those mids, so make the grill frame larger than the speaker front so you can slide it on and off with a friction fit

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Quiller View Post
              DO IT

              there's not a lot of room on the sides of those mids, so make the grill frame larger than the speaker front so you can slide it on and off with a friction fit
              You'll also need some depth to clear the TB Woofer when it starts pumping out bass - an extra 1/2" clearance should do it.

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