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  • port placement questions

    I see many diy designs with rear firing ports. Does it matter much if I change designs and have the ports come out the front instead of the rear? I always figured that front firing allows for closer placement to the wall. while rear firing hides them from site. I am scanning through my speaker building books but I can't find an answer to this. Thank you for any help.

  • #2
    For the most part the main reason for rear porting is when there isn't enough space on the front to fit a port. There's no other reason to do it, other than personal preference.
    www.billfitzmaurice.com
    www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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    • #3
      Thanks, what I am considering has room

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      • #4
        Port firing back is better in some ways.
        This is actual near field port response: http://geokrilov.com/1208_tube_nf.gif
        There is much more than just port tuning frequency there.
        And one can hear this as distortions in the midrange.
        When the port is on the rear those higher frequencies are reduced.
        So it is preferable to use a back firing port.
        As for closer placement to the wall - the closer to the wall - the worse stereo imaging and general sound quality.
        But one can get "more bass" from a small loudspeaker by moving it closer to the wall.

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        • #5
          I agree with George that a rear-firing port can significantly attenuate midrange frequencies that sneak out the port. Not important for a sub, of course. A bottom-firing port is another good choice if rear firing is impractical.
          Francis

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          • #6
            Thanks, I know that near the wall is bad for imaging. But 5 kids and WAF demand that my speakers are within a foot of the wall... unfortunately. Bottom won't work.. I will most likely go with rear firing since a lack of midrange distortion is my #1 goal

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            • #7
              Look for a design meant for near wall placement. Near wall placement is bad for speakers not designed for it.

              Sharing what design you're considering might bring more helpful comments.

              A foot of backspace won't congest your rear ports.

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              • #8
                Yes, djg has a good point. Near wall placement speakers have minimal baffle step correction, so you should choose a design meant for that use.
                Francis

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                • #9
                  Thanks,. I might have a solution. I have negotiated another spot that will allow them to be about 2-3 feet from the wall.

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                  • #10
                    It's easier to ask forgiveness than permission.

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                    • #11
                      Here's a thread on a speaker designed for near wall placement.

                      http://techtalk.parts-express.com/fo...gn#post1413026

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                      • #12
                        One foot is enough for a rear port of medium sized floorstanding speaker and for all bookshelf speakers.

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