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Had Idea for a MTM design

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  • Ilovspkrs
    started a topic Had Idea for a MTM design

    Had Idea for a MTM design

    I had an idea for a different style of a MTM speaker-- I've noticed that a lot of the Wilson Audio speakers have the midrange driver tilted back at an angle while the tweeter is placed vertical. What if an MTM design were made with both MR drivers were angled-- the lower one angled up and the upper one angled down. How would that affect the vertical dispersion pattern?--which if I understand correctly the vertical dispersion of MTM's are limited What would be the pros and cons of a design like that? Thanks

  • djg
    replied
    Please post up a build thread when you do this.

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  • fpitas
    replied
    Originally posted by Ilovspkrs View Post
    While on the subject of MTM designs, I've been thinking about using a small MTM speaker in the Nearfield on a desktop. I've had another idea, that if the speaker could always be aimed so the listening position was precisely on the tweeter axis, even at close range, this would do away with the lobbing issue. This might be accomplished with a stand that allow the speaker to be tilted (or rotated) in the vertical plane. Is my thinking correct about this?
    Two comments. The phasing of an MTM is usually designed so that the Z offsets work out with the listener (at least) several feet away from the speaker. As you get closer, the relative delay of the midranges increases because of the angle. Also, why MTM for nearfield? The point of MTM is to minimize floor and ceiling reflections. If you're very near the speaker, those aren't much of a problem.

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  • billfitzmaurice
    replied
    Because of the lobing at close listening distances this is one application where MTM doesn't work as well as even MT, let alone coaxial. That's why you seldom, if ever, see MTMs marketed as studio nearfields.

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  • Ilovspkrs
    replied
    While on the subject of MTM designs, I've been thinking about using a small MTM speaker in the Nearfield on a desktop. I've had another idea, that if the speaker could always be aimed so the listening position was precisely on the tweeter axis, even at close range, this would do away with the lobbing issue. This might be accomplished with a stand that allow the speaker to be tilted (or rotated) in the vertical plane. Is my thinking correct about this?

    Leave a comment:


  • PEB
    replied
    I implemented your idea in my Bamberg Series 6 speaker. With CAD, I designed the degree of tilt such that all three driver axes converged to the listener at 10 feet distance. Reduces midrange delay from the tweeter and puts the listener directly on axis with tweeter and both midrange drivers.

    Leave a comment:


  • billfitzmaurice
    replied
    It would reduce the lobing on the vertical plane compared to a flat baffle close to the speaker, but it's really more of a cosmetic treatment than anything else. That lobing goes away a few feet out from the speaker, where the outputs of the midbasses integrate into a single wavefront. Wilsons are ridiculously high priced, and part of making them seem to the uninformed that they're worth the price is some odd, even bizarre, configurations.

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