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Speaker evaluation using scales

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  • #16
    Originally posted by billfitzmaurice View Post
    The same applies at A3, and all but the highest octave:



    That's complicated, because the strings that aren't being hammered still produce sound. But that's not the case with a horn. This unspecified horn playing an A3 clearly shows 2nd and 3rd harmonic content that exceeds the fundamental, while even the fourth harmonic comes close:
    Thanks BF, for providing evidence.

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    • #17
      I so wanted this thread to be about weighing speakers.
      Francis

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Dave Bullet View Post
        Of course we have sine wave sweeps, but it occurred to me I probably need to include some scale playing across instruments and synthesized material (different waveform types) to assess any inconsistency or unnaturalness.

        Good instruments with wide bandwidth that spring to mind would be piano and saxophone.
        When you look at spectral plots of instrumental notes, you're essentially looking at the magnitude of a bunch of sinusoids that make up the note you're hearing. If all you heard was the fundamental, then everything would sound like a whistle. Applying other harmonics, or over-tones, with varying amplitudes and phase shifts is what gives instruments their unique sounds, even when playing the "same note". It's what makes a middle-A from a piano and the middle-A from a trumpet sound different. When you measure the frequency response of a speaker with sine sweeps, you're measuring the full band response of the speaker. It's the ability of the speaker to play these upper frequencies that allows the speaker to play "different waveform types". In other words, generically speaking, if a speaker has flat frequency response across the full band, then it will be able to play a full scale as well.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by fpitas View Post
          I so wanted this thread to be about weighing speakers.
          OK, use this:
          www.billfitzmaurice.com
          www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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          • #20
            Originally posted by billfitzmaurice View Post

            OK, use this:
            "Does this subwoofer make me look fat?"
            Francis

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            • #21
              Originally posted by 1100xxben View Post

              When you look at spectral plots of instrumental notes, you're essentially looking at the magnitude of a bunch of sinusoids that make up the note you're hearing. If all you heard was the fundamental, then everything would sound like a whistle. Applying other harmonics, or over-tones, with varying amplitudes and phase shifts is what gives instruments their unique sounds, even when playing the "same note". It's what makes a middle-A from a piano and the middle-A from a trumpet sound different. When you measure the frequency response of a speaker with sine sweeps, you're measuring the full band response of the speaker. It's the ability of the speaker to play these upper frequencies that allows the speaker to play "different waveform types". In other words, generically speaking, if a speaker has flat frequency response across the full band, then it will be able to play a full scale as well.
              Exactly what I was referring to: get the frequency response correct, and the scales will fall into place automatically, as mostly all harmonics will be "caught" within the limit of the high frequency unit, assuming it can reproduce out to 20k, unless there are very loud, very high order harmonics that lie above 20k.

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