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Boom box build (another one, but first for me)

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  • #16
    Rough cut the openings with a jigsaw and use strips of mdf with double side tape to flush from along the lines of the openings. Then you just have to do the final corners by hand with a file.

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    • #17
      You could clamp a piece of hardwood right on the line and just cut it with the jigsaw. The piece of hardwood would essentially keep you from cutting outside the line. Do one side at a time.. A little sanding with a thin block and I think you'd be golden. TomZ
      *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
      *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

      *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

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      • #18
        To do that, what I do is take 4 strips of wood. Length doesn't matter as long as they are longer than the edge they will guide and are not so long to be unwieldly. Then you go around the square, clamping or double side taping one strip at a time along the edge, letting the long end go off and then butting the next up against it and letting it go off the long side on its edge. Not sure I am describing that well. I will go mock it up and take a picture and add it in a few minutes.

        Then a router with a flush trim and only the corners will need cleaned up if you need them to be *square*

        Here we go - I had photos of when I made the router insert holes on my workstation.
        First is the router insert in place:
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        Next I put the strips around the insert. In your case, no insert, just put the strips up to the lines:
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        And now, pull out the insert, leaving the strips for the router to follow:
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        In this case I was routing from above so I left a recess for the place to go into but it works equally as well from below with a flush trim.

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        • #19
          Incidentally, this worked so well that if I remove an insert to change a bit on a sunny day, the aluminum heats up and I have to mallet it back into the hole!

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          • #20
            Fantastic ideas guys!

            I'll have to double check my router bit stash, but I think I have a top bearing bit as well from doing door hinge templates. That will make the template work much smaller and more stable. Also... I'm not going to trim them out to square, the 1/4" round doesn't bug me at all, but wobbly sides will
            Electronics engineer, woofer enthusiast, and musician.
            Wogg Music
            Published projects: PPA100 Bass Guitar Amp, ISO El-Cheapo Sub, Indy 8 2.1 powered sub, MicroSat, SuperNova Minimus

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            • #21
              I went with the taped on trim jig idea using a 1/2 x 2 red oak board. I didn't have a top bearing bit to go through, the one I have for hinge templates is 1/2" and only about 3/8" deep just to do the recess for hinges. Instead I used by 1/4" end bearing flush trim bit.

              Click image for larger version

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              After taping the template on, I drilled a 3/8" hold to drop the trim bit in with the depth adjusted to ride right in that 1/2" pocket while the template is underneath. Then it's a blind trim around the template to finish the square hole.

              The underside carpet tape didn't hold as well as I hoped under the vibration of the router, my makeshift router table is just rough sheathing plywood that didn't let the tape grip. That meant the thing started to walk around as I was trying to trim, which was fun to manage. The edge didn't end up as square as I had hoped, but it's close enough (horseshoes and hand grenades and all that).

              Click image for larger version

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              Then it was a repeat, but slightly smaller for the small panel on the back side.

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              Electronics engineer, woofer enthusiast, and musician.
              Wogg Music
              Published projects: PPA100 Bass Guitar Amp, ISO El-Cheapo Sub, Indy 8 2.1 powered sub, MicroSat, SuperNova Minimus

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              • #22
                For the vent slot, I use my oak pieces and did a L / R stop point and a guide, using the offset from the edge of the router plate to the bit. That worked OK, starting the plunge was a problem though so that needs a little filing to clean up. Then the easy bits, the circle jig cuts for the speakers.

                To make it pretty I used a 45 degree chamfer with the router mounted under the board (my router "table").

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                That worked nicely.

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                The not so straight edge to the front panel looks quite a bit more acceptable with the chamfer as well.

                Lastly, the rabbet edges... I bought a multi bearing rabbet bit to get to the 1/4" size and measured it up on the table.

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                A little test cut on some spare wood to verify.

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                Then ran that across the top and bottom edges of the whole poplar frame.

                Up next: some sanding work to get my miter cuts to fit smoothly and the glue!
                Electronics engineer, woofer enthusiast, and musician.
                Wogg Music
                Published projects: PPA100 Bass Guitar Amp, ISO El-Cheapo Sub, Indy 8 2.1 powered sub, MicroSat, SuperNova Minimus

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                • #23
                  Moment of truth... the glue up. Doing the old tape and fold miter assembly method, with an improvised resistance band for extra pressure. Squeeze out was pretty good along the front, the back panel was a little less, so I added a bit more titebond from the inside and have it set to cure on it's back.

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                  And now we wait and hope it's solid enough to template the top and bottom panels.
                  Electronics engineer, woofer enthusiast, and musician.
                  Wogg Music
                  Published projects: PPA100 Bass Guitar Amp, ISO El-Cheapo Sub, Indy 8 2.1 powered sub, MicroSat, SuperNova Minimus

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by wogg View Post
                    The underside carpet tape didn't hold as well as I hoped under the vibration of the router, my makeshift router table is just rough sheathing plywood that didn't let the tape grip. That meant the thing started to walk around as I was trying to trim, which was fun to manage.
                    This is the same process that I mentioned above but did not document like Dukk.

                    I have never had a lot of luck with carpet tape. If it is a smooth surface I use double sides tape from MCLS. For rough surfaces I use the thicker 3M that you can get at any box store. If you aren't routing the final surface a few short beads will do the trick.

                    I learned this method back in the 90'a at a Rockford Fosgate training and have been using it ever since.

                    BTW, the box looks very nice. Can't wait to see the finished product!

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by davidroberts View Post


                      I learned this method back in the 90'a at a Rockford Fosgate training and have been using it ever since.
                      HA! RTTI for the WIN!

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                      • #26
                        Yep. Still have my binder that I refer to from time to time.

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                        • #27
                          Looking pretty solid, this should do. I haven't tested exactly how strong out of sheer fear.

                          For the top and bottom, the plan is to bar clamp the rough cut MDF to the top and trim route around the front and sides. Then I'll have to tape it up while clamped and flip it to re-clamp and route the back side.

                          There will be little bits of wood putty in here, first for the poplar at the miter joints that was a little bowed in the board, and second for the slight mismatches to the top panel.

                          Also super curious about Rockford Fosgate institute
                          Electronics engineer, woofer enthusiast, and musician.
                          Wogg Music
                          Published projects: PPA100 Bass Guitar Amp, ISO El-Cheapo Sub, Indy 8 2.1 powered sub, MicroSat, SuperNova Minimus

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by wogg View Post
                            Also super curious about Rockford Fosgate institute
                            Back in the late 80's & 90's (maybe longer, mine was '93) they offered a class called Top Gun for installers at the Arizona headquarters. IIRC it was a week long with lots of hands on training for everything from building boxes to making jigs. A little dated now but still a fun experience.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by davidroberts View Post

                              Back in the late 80's & 90's (maybe longer, mine was '93) they offered a class called Top Gun for installers at the Arizona headquarters. IIRC it was a week long with lots of hands on training for everything from building boxes to making jigs. A little dated now but still a fun experience.
                              Cool! I would have been all over that as a teenager at the time. I was putting woofers in everything around then, but had no money
                              Electronics engineer, woofer enthusiast, and musician.
                              Wogg Music
                              Published projects: PPA100 Bass Guitar Amp, ISO El-Cheapo Sub, Indy 8 2.1 powered sub, MicroSat, SuperNova Minimus

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                IMO Rockford Fosgate was unrivaled in the 90s in the effort they put into making sure their dealers were the best trained in the industry. I never made it down to the Arizona headquarters but their fabulous distributor in Canada, Korbon Trading, used to run similar trainings Canada wide every year where they would bring up Ron Trout, Wayne Harris, Garry Springgay, Mark Fakuda, etc as presenters. They had courses both for electric and acoustic theory and also for installation.

                                I attended several in those years and It absolutely gave their dealers a considerable edge over their competition.

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