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How to hide veneer seams on chamfered edges

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  • How to hide veneer seams on chamfered edges

    I am looking for any tips / tricks to hide veneer seems on chamfered edges (and corners for that matter).

    I have found that using thinner 10mm veneer vs studier 22mm veneer can reduce how proud the veneer edge is, but can also make imperfections under the veneer more visible and doesn't totally hide the veneer seam. When applying veneer to a chamfered edge baffle, the seams are even more visible for me at least.

    My method of application for 90 degree corners consists of applying veneer to one side, routing off access, and then repeating with the joining side. For chamfered edges, I start with the angles farthest from the drivers, then work my way to the final veneer piece that surrounds the drivers. This is in an effort to hide the seams as best as possible when looking at the speaker on axis.

    I don't trim the chamfered edge veneer pieces to be exact, I apply each piece and then trim the chamfered edge veneer by hand with a new razor blade, usually with poor results.

    I know there has to be a better way but I can't figure out what that is from my research. Thanks for any suggestions!

  • #2
    Ive had great results trimming veneer with either a router/mill cut file or just a mill cut file. When using a file i push the file in from the face of the veneer slightly askew but at90 deg to the face and flat against the other face of the box. Its the teeth on the side of the file that cut off the excess. Edge grain cutting is much easier than end grain cutting. Care must be taken when cutting ead grain not to take too agressive of a cut and tearing the veneer Let the file do the work by taking only an inch or so with each push. In certain instances i have reinforced the backside of theveneer edge that I'm cutting by running a thin bead of CA glue(super glue)prior to cutting it with the file. This causes it to cut rather than tear.
    This is just my experience. Your results my vary. Best of luck. And pratice on some scrap first.

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    • #3
      On any surface that I cannot use a router for trimming I cut the veneer within 1/16" final size before application. Make a sanding block from a 4" x 4" or so piece of mdf with 220 or 400 grit sandpaper glued to it.
      Use a thin coat of glue, apply the paper, cover with a piece of saran wrap and lightly clamp or weight down sandwiched to another piece of mdf to keep it flat until good and dry.
      Gently sand "down grain" and slightly inward toward the box. When you are almost there register the block flat against the adjacent face with about 1/2" of it outside the edge you are working and take it to flush.
      This method minimizes the chance of damage to an adjacent surface. Take your time with it; even just the weight of the sanding block will cut quickly on the edge of a veneer.

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      • #4
        Tom Zarbo has some informative youtube videos on this subject. Here's one.

         
        "Everything is nothing without a high sound quality." (Sure Electronics)

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        • #5
          mattp has a build thread with loads of clear closeups of a somewhat complicated veneer job

          My Current Project...(Teasers...) - Techtalk Speaker Building, Audio, Video Discussion Forum

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          • #6
            Thanks guys for the great recommendations. TITMAS I'm going to try your recommendation next. Good tip on using super glue on end grain to keep it from tearing.

            edgecreek and ernperkins, sounds like similar tracks. I think the sanding block for the goal line finish is what I am missing. Trying to take off the last 1/16" with a razor blade for me has resulting in some tearing or uneven lines.

            Thanks djg for pointing me to mattp's great work. Looks like he applied his parts in a difference sequence, which I might try. Great grain matching also.

            Sounds like practice and patience are key here as in many other areas of speaker building. Thanks all again.

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            • #7
              I use a utility knife or one of my good chisels to start with and fine tune with a piece of PSA sand paper on a scrap piece of mdf. Results look like this:

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              • #8
                I use a utility knife or one of my good chisels to start with and fine tune with a piece of PSA sand paper on a scrap piece of mdf. Results look like this:

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                • #9
                  s7horton That’s ridiculous. Thanks for sharing. Are you using paper backed veneer? The paper seems to be the hard part to hide. I was just reading on another forum that coloring the paper edge with a marker the same color as the veneer helps hide it.

                  Did you apply the chamfered edge first or the baffle? Did you tape the first applied veneer to keep from scratching it? Thanks again for the tips.

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                  • #10
                    Almost always I use unbacked, that’s how I get the results that I do. In the rare case that I need backed veneer, I special order the backer as wood instead of paper in a species that more closely matches the face veneer. Like this:

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by cpconner View Post
                      s7horton Did you apply the chamfered edge first or the baffle? Did you tape the first applied veneer to keep from scratching it? Thanks again for the tips.
                      Baffle is second to last. Top is last. I work from the bottom to the back to the sides to the chamfers to the front to the top chamfer to the top.

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                      • #12
                        Pattern actually makes a ton of sense. Thanks again for the input.

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                        • #13
                          For paper backed I'll use a veneer saw and a hard sanding block of MDF block with sandpaper glued to it. I'll also use a cabinet scraper to help keep the edges crisp.
                          John H

                          Synergy Horn, SLS-85, BMR-3L, Mini-TL, BR-2, Titan OB, B452, Udique, Vultus, Latus1, Seriatim, Aperivox,Pencil Tower

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