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How are most of your mounting drivers in cabinets, t-nuts or other?

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  • How are most of your mounting drivers in cabinets, t-nuts or other?

    Seems to me, t-nuts are the way to go.

    Are some of you just screwing directly into wood? I've done that in the past.

    Are there other choices?

    Seems t-nuts are the obvious choice, but before I start my construction this weekend, I wanted to check on the consensus.

  • #2
    Really, unless you're talking about extra big, or very heavy drivers, the black oxide screws that PE sells seem to do the trick for almost everything. After well over a hundred cabinets, speaker and subwoofer, they have never failed. T-nuts can be fiddly unless things are nearly perfectly lined up, and just don't seem necessary to me for most situations.

    #8 flathead for larger drivers, #6 for the smaller ones, I've even used #4 screws for real small flat face drivers like ND65 and such.

    Predrill a hole approx. the size of the shaft of the screw and usually that's all it takes for a strong enough hold.

    Also, I usually put either a little wood glue or superglue in each hole to 'firm up' the wood or MDF fibers a bit...It just makes the wood fibers a little harder and a smidge less likely to strip out; more durable for several in/out cycles with the screws.

    TomZ
    *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
    *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

    *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

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    • #3
      I stopped using T nuts years ago, the quality just isn't there any more. I use screws. My cabs are all 1/2" plywood, which isn't enough for screw retention, so I add 1x1 inch blocks of 1/2" plywood to beef up the baffle where the screws go.
      www.billfitzmaurice.com
      www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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      • #4
        I have been using nuts and bolts on woofers and screws on tweeters. I am however, going to play with magnet mounting as Linkwitz did and slightly differently Kef.

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        • #5
          Moved away from T-nuts some time back and started using these, really like them. A dab of epoxy applied to the outside before screwing them into the mdf or plywood helps keep them locked in. Available in many different sizes, English or Metric. Since they are machine screw inserts, it gives you a larger variety of head choices to pick from for the screws. The added bonus is you can install and remove the driver as many times as you like and never have to worry about stripping out the wood. To prevent the chance of cross-threading a screw, I always use a hand screwdriver for installation.

          https://www.amazon.com/Uxcell-a16103...TDQHKN4WH3C65Y

          Click image for larger version

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          My "No-Name" CC Speaker
          Kerry's "Silverbacks"
          Ben's Synchaeta's for Mom
          The Archers
          Rick's "db" Desktop CBT Arrays
          The Gandalf's

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          • #6
            I generally use black oxide screws as I don't usually remove drivers repeatedly. Anything that might need to be serviced or removed more than a couple times gets the inserts posted above.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Kevin K. View Post
              Moved away from T-nuts some time back and started using these, really like them. A dab of epoxy applied to the outside before screwing them into the mdf or plywood helps keep them locked in. Available in many different sizes, English or Metric. Since they are machine screw inserts, it gives you a larger variety of head choices to pick from for the screws. The added bonus is you can install and remove the driver as many times as you like and never have to worry about stripping out the wood. To prevent the chance of cross-threading a screw, I always use a hand screwdriver for installation.

              https://www.amazon.com/Uxcell-a16103...TDQHKN4WH3C65Y

              Click image for larger version

Name:	61iugCBHxcL._AC_UL160_SR160,160_.jpg
Views:	362
Size:	6.8 KB
ID:	1428698
              I've used these before on other projects (not speaker building).

              Not sure why I didn't think of them. I might go with them this time.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Simon Moon View Post

                I've used these before on other projects (not speaker building).

                Not sure why I didn't think of them. I might go with them this time.
                I used those for my subwoofer cabinets. Screwed them into small blocks of wood and glued the blocks behind the front panel. Works very well.
                Francis

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                • #9
                  I use the black PE sheet metal screws. When I built Tom Z's Tenacious sub, I did use two machine screws and nuts and the rest sheet metal screws to hold the Tang Band W8-740 sub, as it is heavy and mounted facing down. I am going to build a Silver D Vapor project. The top speaker is open baffle. I may use machine screws and nuts for a neater rear view.

                  For my 8" Dayton subs, I added blocks of wood at the 6 mounting points, as the rather deep speaker rebate left about 3/8" of MDF for holding a heavy driver.

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                  • #10
                    I switched to threaded brass inserts years ago. I've had T-nuts strip out more than a few times when trying to remove a driver and it's a PITA. Having said that, the black oxide screws that PE sells are just fine if you don't plan on removing your drivers often (and they're A LOT cheaper).

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                    • #11
                      Just a question, who removes their drivers more than two times? I've designed and built around two dozen pairs of speakers and I don't recall ever having to install, remove, install, remove, install, remove, install.
                      Craig

                      The lowest possible F3 box alignment is not always the best alignment.

                      Designing and building speaker projects are like playing with adult Lego Blocks for me.

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                      • #12
                        I could see it for changes to a crossover over time I guess... some guys never really "finish" a crossover. But I think if you're careful to not over-tighten the screws, even a dozen remove/install cycles shouldn't be an issue I wouldn't think.
                        TomZ
                        *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
                        *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

                        *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by PWR RYD View Post
                          Just a question, who removes their drivers more than two times? I've designed and built around two dozen pairs of speakers and I don't recall ever having to install, remove, install, remove, install, remove, install.
                          In traditional (passive) speakers, probably not many. Typically, I'll build raw mdf cabinets, install the drivers, take measurements and work out the crossovers, followed by removing the drivers and covering the cabinets in veneer, and then re-install the drivers. On occasion, damping needs to be played around with (add some, remove some), so that might lead to another removal and installation of a driver.

                          The speakers I'm currently working on are Active/Passive 3-ways with the DSP amplifier and crossover mounted inside the cabinet. To make changes to the DSP programming of the amp, the woofer has to come back out to access the programming port of the amp. In this instance, I can definitely see installing and removing drivers several times due to the complexity of the design.

                          Out of curiosity, of the two dozen pairs of cabinets you built Craig, you never stripped a screw hole, not even once? If not, ever hold back on how much you tightened a screw the second or third time for fear of stripping it in the wood?
                          My "No-Name" CC Speaker
                          Kerry's "Silverbacks"
                          Ben's Synchaeta's for Mom
                          The Archers
                          Rick's "db" Desktop CBT Arrays
                          The Gandalf's

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If you strip the hole, stuff some toothpicks, cut to size if needed, with a few drops of wood glue in the hole. When you add the screw again it will push the toothpicks outward and create pressure for the threads to grab.

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                            • #15
                              Mounting the crossover externally eliminates the need to remove drivers to tweak it, as well as immeasurably speeding up the tweaking process, since you can swap components and see the result in real time.
                              www.billfitzmaurice.com
                              www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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