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Piano black finish and scratches

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  • Piano black finish and scratches

    I have some Piano black commercial speakers (Kef LS50) that have some very fine scratches from dusting with a microfiber cloth. I like the look but not the upkeep

    I would like to polish them but I am not sure what to use. I tried some of my normal polish and it did not really cut it.

    Any ideas?

  • #2
    Anything you do to try and correct the situation you describe will just make things worse. Accept the condition as is. And in the future, avoid glossy black finishes if this fact is not to your liking.

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    • #3
      Find a good paint and body guy, he can polish the cabinets for you since he'll have the right equipment.
      My "No-Name" CC Speaker
      Kerry's "Silverbacks"
      Ben's Synchaeta's for Mom
      The Archers
      Rick's "db" Desktop CBT Arrays
      The Gandalf's

      Comment


      • #4
        [QUOTE=robertm;n1428859]Anything you do to try and correct the situation you describe will just make things worse. Accept the condition as is. And in the future, avoid glossy black finishes if this fact is not to your liking.[/QUOTE

        Totally wrong. Ignore this post.
        craigk

        " Voicing is often the term used for band aids to cover for initial design/planning errors " - Pallas

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        • #5
          I would Google and see if other sites have recommendations. I know to CREATE a piano gloss finish there is Swirl Remover (Meguiars for example) and Polish but I don't know if these would work on an already finished speaker or make it worse.

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          • #6
            It depends how deep they are. Try rubbing compound and then polishing compound. If that doesn't do it wet sand, lightly, with 3M Trizact 3000g, then rub it out and polish it.
            www.billfitzmaurice.com
            www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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            • #7
              Originally posted by billfitzmaurice View Post
              It depends how deep they are. Try rubbing compound and then polishing compound. If that doesn't do it wet sand, lightly, with 3M Trizact 3000g, then rub it out and polish it.
              Thank you Bill. I used a mild polish but was leery to go with any more grit. Thank you for the Trizact tip.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Kevin K. View Post
                Find a good paint and body guy, he can polish the cabinets for you since he'll have the right equipment.
                Thank you Kevin. I do have a DA etc but I am concerned about getting the surface hot and making it worse. I will try by hand with a new foam pad to start.

                Thanks again.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yikes, if these are fine scratches fine polishing is the way to go. Swirl removers are a fine polishing compound. Some cleaner-waxes also have fine polishing action. Mechanical polishing with smaller pads is prefered. Drop in or call AutoGeek for more information about polishing compounds. My first try would be Meguiar's cleaner wax with a soft 3 inch pad on a cordless drill.
                  John H

                  Synergy Horn, SLS-85, BMR-3L, Mini-TL, BR-2, Titan OB, B452, Udique, Vultus, Latus1, Seriatim, Aperivox,Pencil Tower

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by stephenmarklay View Post

                    Thank you Kevin. I do have a DA etc but I am concerned about getting the surface hot and making it worse. I will try by hand with a new foam pad to start.

                    Thanks again.
                    Stephen, I wasn't sure what, if any equipment you had. The DA will work as long as you can adjust it to run slow enough. Or you can go with John's suggestion. Since these are factory speakers, who knows how thick the finish coat is. To remove scratches, you are in essence removing finish. My suggestion, if you are going to attempt the repair yourself, try it on one of the less visible surfaces first (back or bottom of the cabinet). Based on the pics I've seen online, it also looks like the baffle has a different type of finish. You should mask that off to make sure the buffing pad doesn't hit it. Good luck.

                    If you decide you want to use the DA, here's a link for some DA pads and compounds I've used in the past (I'm assuming you already have a Velcro backer for the pads). Available in two sizes, 5.5" or 6.5" diameters, pick the one that matches you backer. Compounds can also be purchased at any Auto retailer and most of them will also carry the 3" buffing pad drill attachment John is referring to. It may be a little cheaper than the DA pads, not sure.

                    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01J588UNG...ing=UTF8&psc=1

                    https://www.amazon.com/Chemical-Guys...5VVCR03GYM25CZ
                    My "No-Name" CC Speaker
                    Kerry's "Silverbacks"
                    Ben's Synchaeta's for Mom
                    The Archers
                    Rick's "db" Desktop CBT Arrays
                    The Gandalf's

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have some piano black speakers with the kind of fine scratches described here, just from dusting. Been meaning to go down to the auto parts store and get some of that wax designed for hiding that type of thing. It comes in different colors (or at least used to; it has been a long time since I fussed with the finish on a vehicle), including black. It's apparently just wax with some pigment in it. Probably just some plain old wax would do the trick. Protects the finish too.

                      Having far too much experience running DA sanders over cars in preparation for paint, in a former life, I must admonish to leave it in the drawer if you are working on nice speakers that you don't want to refinish. If you must sand, do it by hand with a bit of water. Not too much water, and not too little. Yes, it would be risky on assembled speakers.

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                      • #12
                        On wet sanding, don't wet the work, wet the paper. Use a spray bottle, with a few drops of dish detergent added as a lubricant. When the paper fills use the spray bottle to rinse the residue off. I don't even use a DA or rotary on my car unless it's over a 1x1 foot area.
                        www.billfitzmaurice.com
                        www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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                        • #13
                          You could contact KEF for their advice.
                          I wonder how much good a paste wax like Renaissance might be? It would be a lot simpler than the above suggestions.

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                          • stephenmarklay
                            stephenmarklay commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Thank you. That was my first thought. They had no suggestions however.

                        • #14
                          [QUOTE=craigk;n1428868]
                          Originally posted by robertm View Post
                          Anything you do to try and correct the situation you describe will just make things worse. Accept the condition as is. And in the future, avoid glossy black finishes if this fact is not to your liking.[/QUOTE

                          Totally wrong. Ignore this post.
                          Some before and after photos should settle the matter.

                          Comment


                          • stephenmarklay
                            stephenmarklay commented
                            Editing a comment
                            It is already settled. I was able to achieve some correction without further scratching. Not perfect but better. I forge forward.

                        • #15
                          If the scratches are from dusting the speakers with a cloth, I doubt seriously any use of fine grit sandpaper is necessary, wet or dry. Compound buffing should do the job, by hand or with tools. For future upkeep, buy a can of air for cleaning keyboards, blow the dust off the cabinet first before wiping with the microfiber cloth. And not all microfiber clothes are the same quality, may have to spend a little more for a good one. I like skatz's suggestion, contact KEF and see what they suggest. Best of luck Stephen.
                          My "No-Name" CC Speaker
                          Kerry's "Silverbacks"
                          Ben's Synchaeta's for Mom
                          The Archers
                          Rick's "db" Desktop CBT Arrays
                          The Gandalf's

                          Comment


                          • stephenmarklay
                            stephenmarklay commented
                            Editing a comment
                            I am on your wavelength. I try not to touch them. But every once in a while a cat print or kid print finds its way to the shiny surface. Like flypaper . But I am getting an air can. Thank you for the idea.
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