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Carmody's Classix II help

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  • #16
    You did a lot more prep than I assumed in my post #4. Do you have a power sander?

    Here's some inspiration. The MDF seams are likely to show through. Again, a textured paint will help hide imperfections.

    Continuum Speakers Using my Trench Method on the MDF Seams - Techtalk Speaker Building, Audio, Video Discussion Forum

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Dukk View Post
      The way the crossover schematic is laid out, and the first picture from the OP is wired, the tweeter is already in reverse polarity.
      Wait a minute. This confuses me more.

      The crossover is soldered correctly: everyone would agree on that, right?

      But where do my negative and positive wires for the tweeter and woofer go? Do the tweeter wires go on opposite poles and woofers hook up regularly?

      Also, regarding the finishing, I just sanded down all the paint and am back to square one. I bought two cans of Krylon primer and Krylon Gloss Black paint and a jug of Bondo. I'm going to start with the Bondo.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by f_crunk View Post

        Also, regarding the finishing, I just sanded down all the paint and am back to square one. I bought two cans of Krylon primer and Krylon Gloss Black paint and a jug of Bondo. I'm going to start with the Bondo.
        Good call. Take your time with bondo and get those seams fully covered and smooth before priming
        Carbon13

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        • #19
          If you hook it up the same way you labeled your initial photo, then it'll correctly have the tweeter wired the proper way (which is "reverse").

          Chris Roemer replied

          Yesterday, 04:21 PM
          Xactly

          (i DID see a layout that was "different" than what's on Paul's "undefinition" site)

          Ultimately, it means that the woofer's "-" term. and the tweeter's "+" go to the same side of your amp. <<<< THIS !


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          • #20
            I just spent most of my Friday night Bondo'ing speakers. How thick or thin do people apply Bondo on the seams? How far into the main panels to you go from the seams to ensure a nice smooth transition?

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Chris Roemer View Post
              If you hook it up the same way you labeled your initial photo, then it'll correctly have the tweeter wired the proper way (which is "reverse").

              Chris Roemer replied

              Yesterday, 04:21 PM
              Xactly

              (i DID see a layout that was "different" than what's on Paul's "undefinition" site)


              The original Classix II kit instructions had incorrect polarity, but that was quickly fixed after a PETT member pointed it out

              Geoff

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              • #22
                I always found Bondo frustrating to work with -- poor adhesion, difficult to spread, difficult to sand to a feather edge, very short application time, etc. Any of the Evercoat Rage products are MUCH easier to work with and leave a superior finish.

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                • #23
                  Bondo definitely takes some practice but it does a fine job on speaker cabs once you get the hang of it. Don't sweat the initial application too much, just get those seams covered best you can and quick as you can. Use good quality low grit sandpaper like 3M 80grit to start and go from there.
                  Carbon13

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                  • #24
                    Alright guys. Just a weekend update.

                    I applied the Bondo yesterday but I'm going to have to agree with kirk78h in that I really hated using it. It dries too quickly and in concert with its drying time I had a difficult time applying it in a thin coat that would also cover the MDF seams into a flush layer with the sutface. It seemed to chip off as well.

                    SO, I ended up sanding most of the bondo off and am back to square one again. I'm going to try the Wood Glue and Water method. I'm going to cover most of the cabinet in one or a few layers of thinned wood glue and see if I can sand that off smooth. Then I'll apply a few coats of primer and a few coats of paint and that should do it.

                    The part I like about the wood glue method is that I can apply it with a brush and that it has a longer drying window.

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                    • #25
                      You can adjust the amount of hardener for your conditions and needs. I have used it in the snow and at 122 degrees.

                      It's like cooking, it takes some time with it to understand how to adjust.
                      Try different amounts on spoonfuls of bondo. Use extra plastic lids, you can flex them and pop it off when cured.

                      A gallon can skin a whole car, you've got plenty.

                      It's also stickier with less hardener.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by davidB View Post
                        You can adjust the amount of hardener for your conditions and needs. I have used it in the snow and at 122 degrees.

                        It's like cooking, it takes some time with it to understand how to adjust.
                        Try different amounts on spoonfuls of bondo. Use extra plastic lids, you can flex them and pop it off when cured.
                        While true, to Kirk78h and f_crunk's point, Bondo is more difficult to work with than other auto-body fillers. In my earlier post I mentioned that Bondo is much cheaper, but after using quite a bit this last weekend I will be using something different after this gallon is gone.

                        A gallon of Bondo at Walmart or Menards is about $15 and $30 at my local auto-parts supplier.
                        Rage Gold is $60 online and $92 at my local auto-parts supplier.
                        3M Platinum Plus is about $55 online and $80 locally.
                        I see that Rage Extreme is much thinner than Rage Gold, so I think I may try that for MDF seams.

                        If you need to save money (but will put in quite a bit more labor in sanding) Bondo is fine. But if you are willing to spend more money, you can save quite a bit of time and sweat using something better than Bondo brand body filler.
                        Last edited by a4eaudio; 01-13-2020, 02:27 AM. Reason: Edit: the last one should be Rage Xtreme (not extreme)

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                        • #27
                          I have not used Rage Extreme but to add to what others have said, Rage Gold is monumentally better than Bondo branded product. It is hard to believe just how much until you actually use some Rage after using Bondo. It is stunning.

                          Not helping things is, if you are buying Bondo (or any product like it) from a WalMart or other big chain, you have no idea how old it is and that absolutely affects how well it works. Anything from a specialty supplier will be much more fresh.

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                          • #28
                            If the purpose is just to seal the cut edges (or roundovers) of MDF, I honestly don't think any body filler is needed. When MDF is cut, the fibers on that edge are compressed. I go over these edges with a damp rag or sponge to raise these fibers. I then let it dry and lightly sand with 220 paper. The standby method to seal these edges is a 1:1 mixture of water and carpenters glue. The sealing agent in this mix is PVA. I stopped doing this years ago because there are a lot of primers available with PVA used to seal new drywall. The best I've found is made by PPG; but there are several good ones; and they are all cheap. I let this dry thoroughly, then scuff off any nibs or brush marks with a red scotch pad. I've been very happy with the results, YMMV.

                            If the purpose is to hide seams, the "trench" method with body filler sounds like the way to go. I usually finish with a textured paint, which hides a multitude of sins.

                            By the way, if you end up buying a better filler, don't throw the Bondo away. You can always mix it with fiberglass resin to make "Rondo". This combination is brushable and somewhat self-leveling; but really, really hard to sand.

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