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  • jhollander
    replied
    Originally posted by dlr View Post
    I've updated WinFilters. The target outptut file will now have the nominal SPL as set.

    WinFilters

    dlr
    Thanks Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • DanP
    replied
    Mentioned before, but the latest release of VituixCAD is really powerful and quite well streamlined. I'm really impressed that it's free. I haven't explored it fully but it seems to be a one-stop-shop for speaker design.

    Dan

    Leave a comment:


  • dlr
    replied
    I've updated WinFilters. The target outptut file will now have the nominal SPL as set.

    WinFilters

    dlr

    Leave a comment:


  • dlr
    replied
    Originally posted by jhollander View Post
    Also from Dave is WinFilters which can export target curves for use with Xsim. Dave if you read this the SPL adjust feature for the target export curves does not seem to be working.
    I just tested the latest version (1.0.0 Rev 3), worked fine. Looks like a never uploaded to my web site. That was almost two years ago, that was probably the change for v3. Thanks for mentioning it. I'll get that uploaded and update my web site, probably tomorrow.

    FYI to anyone not familiar with it, for target curves, it's built into WinPCD similarly to Jeff's PCD. And the SPL change adjustment does work in it.

    dlr

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian Steele
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris Roemer View Post
    You should be able to make up your own target curves. Just use "textbook" filters on some "dummy" files you can make up that all have "flat" freq. AND imp. curves.
    I've got 4n & 8n .zma files, and 90dB .frd files. If I need lower SPL curves, I just add some series resistance (which WOULD alter the z data). Using an appropriate L-pad shuld let you target any SPL & Z
    I could, but that's a lot less convenient than having them readily accessible and configurable within the application itself.

    Leave a comment:


  • hongrn
    replied
    Originally posted by PWR RYD View Post

    Hi Hong,

    Where've ya been?
    Hi Craig,

    Taking a short sabbatical to get my daughter ready for college. Just acquired a new 4-channel oscilloscope and seriously getting back to speakers and amps. Still have a lot to learn from this bunch, so time to end hibernation!

    Leave a comment:


  • PWR RYD
    replied
    Originally posted by hongrn View Post
    Please don't forget David Ralph's WinPCD. It's Jeff Bagby's PCD without MS Excel.

    www.speakerdesign.net
    Hi Hong,

    Where've ya been?

    Leave a comment:


  • PWR RYD
    replied
    Unibox for modeling enclosure bass alignments and Dave's WinPCD for crossover design. I also always run my designs in XSIM as well.

    WinPCD is not clunky like the original Excel based PCD is, but it can only do parallel crossovers, not series (not a show stopper for most of us).

    Leave a comment:


  • stephenmarklay
    replied
    Originally posted by hongrn View Post
    Please don't forget David Ralph's WinPCD. It's Jeff Bagby's PCD without MS Excel.

    www.speakerdesign.net
    have no fear. I had not forgotten. I actually never knew it So thank you so much for that.

    Leave a comment:


  • devnull
    replied
    BassBox works great for box sizes including taking into account internal bracing and vent volumes, producing list of panels needed. I've found it over estimates port lengths.

    Hornresp is an animal unto itself. Awesome program that just keeps having more features added to it. Hard to find all the different features and nuances that make it so versatile and great. Free

    VituixCad is great for crossover design and evaluation. I've never used it for box design. Has the ability to import multiple FRD files for individual drivers off axis response. Fast crossover optimizer with the ability to set target curves for individual drivers. Free

    Visiton Boxsim. Steep learning curve. Has the ability to use multiple amps, DSP. Slow but effective crossover optimizer that will work on DSP settings. Good graphs for polar and directivity. Not great for box design, but allows you to enter box dimensions and driver positions in three axis, helps with seeing box impact on frequency response. Will work with non-Visiton drivers. Free

    Those are my four goto programs.

    Leave a comment:


  • billfitzmaurice
    replied
    WinISD and HornResp. I wouldn't sweat the age of basic box software, the math hasn't changed. HornResp is updated on what seems like a monthly basis, with additional features being added each time. Once I do the calcs in those I physically model the box with Sketchup.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhollander
    replied
    Originally posted by hongrn View Post
    Please don't forget David Ralph's WinPCD. It's Jeff Bagby's PCD without MS Excel.

    www.speakerdesign.net
    Also from Dave is WinFilters which can export target curves for use with Xsim. Dave if you read this the SPL adjust feature for the target export curves does not seem to be working.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris Roemer
    replied
    You should be able to make up your own target curves. Just use "textbook" filters on some "dummy" files you can make up that all have "flat" freq. AND imp. curves.
    I've got 4n & 8n .zma files, and 90dB .frd files. If I need lower SPL curves, I just add some series resistance (which WOULD alter the z data). Using an appropriate L-pad shuld let you target any SPL & Z

    Leave a comment:


  • hongrn
    replied
    Please don't forget David Ralph's WinPCD. It's Jeff Bagby's PCD without MS Excel.

    www.speakerdesign.net

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian Steele
    replied
    XSim provides a bit more flexibility in the x-over design (you basically "draw" the x-over that you want to use, and you can add and remove elements very easily). However PCD has one big advantage that XSim does not offer - target curves. With XSim you basically have to eyeball your way to a result that looks like what you want to get. With PCD, you can configure a target curve for each driver and then adjust the filter components to match the adjust response to the target.

    Jeff's not making use of one of Excel's great features though - it's "Goal Seek" analysis feature. That feature could probably be used to find the best components to get the best match to the chosen target curve.

    Leave a comment:

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