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  • Your pick for a stand alone router table

    I was going to build one up but have decided to just buy something. I do like the table top kind and the Bosch RA1181 seems like a decent choice https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...ZF0RDDDN73A72Q

    But all of them seem to have some negative points. I don’t really want to spend the money for Kreg. But it seems to garner the most positive reviews.
    the https://www.amazon.com/Precision-Rou...11&s=hi&sr=1-4

    Since I don’t have a table saw and when I get one it will also be a smaller bench top type so I won’t be adding on the router extension.

    If you have one that you can recommend I would appreciate your input.

    Thank you!

  • #2
    It's probably hard to answer, but what types of things do you anticipate doing with it? I made a really simple one that I think I mentioned before maybe to you? or another poster... anyway, I don't need my router table to do much but be square, and hold those big scary bits tightly far away from my fingers. :0

    I do round-overs with mine pretty much exclusively, small to 1 1/4" but that's just me. I can manually do my adjustments to get a perfect cut in a minute or two.
    But you might want to do more advanced things with yours.

    I looked at the two tables you linked to, seem nice enough, but that Kreg is pricey.

    Since you don't have a table saw, that to me is the most important tool you can have as a speaker builder, I'd be lost without mine. A dialed-in table saw with a sturdy and square guide is the #1 tool for speaker building in my opinion. I'd sink more dollars into that as opposed to the router table if it were me. The table saw gives you more bang for the buck if you ask me.

    Curious to see what the more established woodworkers think about this.

    TomZ
    *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
    *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

    *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

    Comment


    • #3
      When I was shopping for a router table, I ultimately decided that a table saw extension was more cost effective and a better use of shop space. You can use the same fence for your table saw and router.

      I bought a second hand old table saw with a bad fence, replaced with an Accusqaure with longer rails for the router table extension. Works very well for my needs.

      Old photo from some years back when I first installed it:

      Click image for larger version

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      "I just use off the shelf textbook filters designed for a resistor of 8 ohms with
      exactly a Fc 3K for both drivers, anybody can do it." -Xmax

      Comment


      • #4
        I have that Bosch router table. I got it for either $99 or $149 rather than $199. I'm happy with it because it does what I need and is a good value for what I paid. It does have a frustrating way to attach the feather boards and there are little spacers that fall off easily during installation/adjustment. I have seen common complaints about that feature but I have become used to it.

        I am amazed at what some of these companies come up with to make something simple (like a router table) do really clever things. Kreg and Woodpecker come to mind as coming up with really cool (mostly expensive) stuff for woodworkers. I do think there is a little bit of "you get what you pay for". If you get a $500+ Kreg router table it is going to be better than an $80 generic router table. But to TomZ's point, what are you going to do with it? At the time I was NOT going to pay $500 for a router table so I got something for a good value. In the next year or so I may change my mind on that, but I am not just building speaker boxes either.

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        • #5
          Can you build a base?

          Lee valley has everything from the full table, to parts to make the table

          Comment


          • stephenmarklay
            stephenmarklay commented
            Editing a comment
            Yes I can Mlau. I just don’t know if buying a “kit” with top, insert etc is an more economical or better quality.

        • #6
          My motto is,,,,,, Buy Tools ONCE! In the long run it’s cheaper to SAVE your money for better than it is to buy good enough for now. You WILL replace it with something better down the road.

          Save,,,,, and buy it ONCE!

          YMMV. Have Fun! Mark

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          • #7
            I got mine from woodpecker's about 5 years ago, phenolic top and stand and their fence system. Simple, reliable and accurate, but they cost now about double what I paid. It appears similar to the Kreg. The benchtop systems are less expensive, if they are adequate for your needs. Kreg makes one, so does Bull Dog, and you mentioned the Bosch. There are others as well. I don't know much about any of them. Infinity tools makes a system, you can buy just parts or the whole thing including a router, but it is not cheap.

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            • #8
              If I was willing to spend 500 to 700 on a stand alone router table, I would seriously consider a small shaper like this one or similar. Bonus is that the motor is built on so you can continue to use your router hand held without swapping back and forth. A small shaper like this one will also be a bit sturdier for those larger projects. Also allows for a bit of growth with shaper cutters of desired.

              https://www.grizzly.com/products/Sho...P-Shaper/W1701

              Comment


              • stephenmarklay
                stephenmarklay commented
                Editing a comment
                Agreed, that looks great. But not I am not spending $700 on one.

            • #9
              Originally posted by tomzarbo View Post
              It's probably hard to answer, but what types of things do you anticipate doing with it? I made a really simple one that I think I mentioned before maybe to you? or another poster... anyway, I don't need my router table to do much but be square, and hold those big scary bits tightly far away from my fingers. :0

              I do round-overs with mine pretty much exclusively, small to 1 1/4" but that's just me. I can manually do my adjustments to get a perfect cut in a minute or two.
              But you might want to do more advanced things with yours.

              I looked at the two tables you linked to, seem nice enough, but that Kreg is pricey.

              Since you don't have a table saw, that to me is the most important tool you can have as a speaker builder, I'd be lost without mine. A dialed-in table saw with a sturdy and square guide is the #1 tool for speaker building in my opinion. I'd sink more dollars into that as opposed to the router table if it were me. The table saw gives you more bang for the buck if you ask me.

              Curious to see what the more established woodworkers think about this.

              TomZ
              I am not a pro woodworker but I find a lot more value in my router than a table saw. With a decent router and flush trim bit, one can rough cut panels with a circular saw or even a jigsaw and make them true and precise - it just takes longer. Add in roundovers, chamfers, rabbets, and circle jigs, and the router is indispensable. I currently own five routers and my next project is dropping three into a table to cut down on time spent doing bit changes.

              Not looking to argue - just presenting a different viewpoint.

              Comment


              • #10
                Originally posted by Dukk View Post

                I am not a pro woodworker but I find a lot more value in my router than a table saw. With a decent router and flush trim bit, one can rough cut panels with a circular saw or even a jigsaw and make them true and precise - it just takes longer. Add in roundovers, chamfers, rabbets, and circle jigs, and the router is indispensable. I currently own five routers and my next project is dropping three into a table to cut down on time spent doing bit changes.

                Not looking to argue - just presenting a different viewpoint.
                You know, I can see that.

                It may have more to do with the fact that when I got a good table saw finally, it totally changed my ability to make good cabinets... as opposed to being mostly frustrated with the quality of the cuts I was getting and lack of repeatability. Night and day difference.

                Had I had a similar experience with a router and really knew all that they could do, I may feel differently. I guess the table saw was my first love.

                I love routers, btw, I have a good collection of them too. It does gets tiring changing them out all the time. Last year I finally got a dedicated router on my circle jig... good move for me, I hate doing circles as it is.

                Thanks for the perspective.
                TomZ
                *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
                *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

                *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

                Comment


                • #11
                  Originally posted by Dukk View Post

                  I am not a pro woodworker but I find a lot more value in my router than a table saw. With a decent router and flush trim bit, one can rough cut panels with a circular saw or even a jigsaw and make them true and precise - it just takes longer. Add in roundovers, chamfers, rabbets, and circle jigs, and the router is indispensable. I currently own five routers and my next project is dropping three into a table to cut down on time spent doing bit changes.

                  Not looking to argue - just presenting a different viewpoint.
                  This is along the lines of what my thought process has been. I am tired to taking a chuck out of a project using my router free hand and as you said you can rough cut and trim which I have done with varying success freehand. But as happened today, sometimes that fails.

                  I am going to get both so it is what can I wait a bit for. I think Tom has good point and I know a table saw would offer me some flexibility and since I am partial to mitering edges that functionality would likely more precise with a table saw than my miter saw.

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    Originally posted by tomzarbo View Post

                    You know, I can see that.

                    It may have more to do with the fact that when I got a good table saw finally, it totally changed my ability to make good cabinets... as opposed to being mostly frustrated with the quality of the cuts I was getting and lack of repeatability. Night and day difference.

                    Had I had a similar experience with a router and really knew all that they could do, I may feel differently. I guess the table saw was my first love.

                    I love routers, btw, I have a good collection of them too. It does gets tiring changing them out all the time. Last year I finally got a dedicated router on my circle jig... good move for me, I hate doing circles as it is.

                    Thanks for the perspective.
                    TomZ
                    I am right there with you and tired if using the wrong tool for the job with mediocre results.

                    I may need to create a “which table saw” thread Since I have space constraints I am thinking about a construction type such as the Dewalt DW745.

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      A stand alone router table will certainly help perform some tasks. But no question, hands down, everything starts with a good quality table saw that has an accurate fence. That's where your money should be spent first. Right behind that is a plunge router. If that router can also be mounted in a router table even better. Everything beyond that (dedicated routers for specific tasks) is just icing on the cake (huge time savings). If you start with crooked cuts frustration, unsquare joints, and scrapped work is not uncommon. Jigs and hand held circular saws using expanding construction adhesive only get you to about a 4 out of 10.
                      Craig

                      The lowest possible F3 box alignment is not always the best alignment.

                      Designing and building speaker projects are like playing with adult Lego Blocks for me.

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                      • #14
                        I am glad I asked this question. I am going to take the table saw advice. I will get the router table after. Between that and my miter saw I should be a bit better off.

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                        • #15
                          I built this enclosed base table. Storage, it's quiet with the doors closed and the dust collection is great.
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