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  • Windows 7 end of support

    So as we all know Windows 7 users don't get any more updates now. I really don't know what to do now, my Win 7 PC working just fine and I want to keep it running, but is it really that dangerous to do so? It all keeps saying "now you won't get any more updates, you are now more vulnerable to threats to your PC, even if you got all kinds of anti-virus program installed."

    I have Win 7 Home 64 bit, Chrome and Norton Internet Security

    Thanks in advance...

  • #2
    I have a W7 machine. I keep it off line. I don't want microsoft screwing with it. I have a cloned backup hard drive too. I bought a chrome book for online use.

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    • #3
      The only way you get infected by malware is by opening emails that you shouldn't or visiting websites that you shouldn't. Don't do that and you're OK. That said, I don't rely on just basic security software, I also have Malwarebytes.
      www.billfitzmaurice.com
      www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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      • #4
        As I posted in another thread, if the maker of your car told you that they wouldn't provide support for its computers after ten years, you would be pretty p - - d off.

        I had a similar issue with a repair for my "ancient" - according to the 'sales consultant' - two year old phone. " We don't keep parts for old phones", was the helpful advice. I asked him how old his car was (11 years) and then, how he would feel if the manufacturer didn't provide parts and service because it was 'too old'; the response was a gormless "I dunno, that's different".

        We don't intend to change to W10 because we don't want to spend A$3500 on a new PC and laptop; and secondly, much of our software in which we have many $$$ invested simply won't work on Windows 10.
        I've used W10 on friend's machines and hate it absolutely.

        We have very good anti-virus, anti-spy and -malware protection and will continue to keep it up to date to protect the computers.

        Geoff

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        • #5
          Geoff Millar Not to belabor the point, I certainly understand where your coming from. In the interest of friendly discussion though... the car and appliance analogies don't hold up to the internet.

          Think of it like this. The Internet is the environment you are using your car / appliance. It changes very, very rapidly. For example... what if the roads all got 4 feet narrower and the speed limits and average speed of traffic went up 300% and all corners became tighter with the same speed expectations? Would you continue to expect your older vehicle that is physically incapable of handling those conditions supported? That's kind of what's going on with the internet, and the life cycle is around 5 years for this level of change. Same for cell phones, the carriers are not going to spend millions of dollars repairing old tech transmission towers because you don't want a new phone.

          If you keep your old Windows 7 machine online, you'll probably be fine for quite some time, but you are taking a risk. Backup... backup... backup. The further away from the end of support date the more like a 0 day exploit ends up in the wild. While Bill is correct, it's typically through opening something you shouldn't have or visiting a shady internet site, sometimes those shady internet sites come in the form of an infected banner ad on a legit site you use everyday.
          Electronics engineer, woofer enthusiast, and musician.
          Wogg Music
          Published projects: PPA100 Bass Guitar Amp, ISO El-Cheapo Sub, Indy 8 2.1 powered sub, MicroSat, SuperNova Minimus

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          • #6
            I have 2 pc's set up exactly like the op's. I back up essential files to thumb drives and an old laptop. Everything works, does what I need, and I am actually quite happy to have no more updates.
            Back up, keep your security software up to date, and don't go risky places. Go merrily on your way until you need a new pc. My next machine will be a Unix box.
            I'm also in the "I tried Win10 and despise it" camp.

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            • #7
              I only just retired my Win XP machine last year, it still works fine but it became so slow and cumbersome to do anything online it was too frustrating to continue with. That's not just because the processors is old and slow and it doesn't have a ton of memory it is because the addons and embedded apps(Adobe Flash for example) used for online activity also stopped getting updates. I also have two Win7 machines that will continue to work fine for some time but already I have run into a roadblock with one of them, one of the applications I use no longer gets updates for 32bit systems so that older hardware is now less useful. As mentioned with safe online practices there is no reason a Win7 machine would really be any more vulnerable going forward, hackers usually target the most popular platforms anyway so these old systems will fly under the radar to a certain extent.. at least until it gets left behind by evolving online subsystems and applications.

              P.S. I'm currently using an Asus flip lap/tablet running Win10, I don't use the touchscreen much because they suck compared go a keyboard for typing text, but I like some of the features that come with a touchscreen like the simple 2 fingered zoom so overall I like it.
              Paul O

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              • #8
                FWIW, I fought the switch to Windows 10 too, worrying about software not running etc. I'm retired IT so I dove deeper and found that for 98% of the programs I had and 100% of the ones I used, my fears were unfounded. However, I hated the tile desktop that came with Windows 10. That was remedied by a freeware program called "Classic Shell" that is an overlay of the Windows 10 desktop which looks, works and feels like Windows 7 interface and is rock solid. I also found many "tweak" programs that gives the user complete control over the reporting functions that I didn't like. I've been running Windows 10 for almost 2 years now with out an issue. I always back up regularly so if the chance something goes badly, I can restore within 1/2 hour. Really painless.

                So, why upgrade your existing PC with Windows 7?

                It's free. I read the other day on an IT website that you can still upgrade for free and register with the serial number of your previous Windows version.

                It's faster to boot, shut down and to use in general.

                Every current program is compatible with Windows 10. Windows 7 support is fading and will be gone in a flash with the lack of support from Microsoft.

                Much better protection from viruses and malware. I use a combination of Windows Defender and Bitblocker, both free and highly rated.

                Anyway, Windows 10 is super solid, reliable and works great for all of us that prefer the Windows 7 interface with the installation of Classic Shell.

                HTH

                Jim

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Jim Holtz View Post
                  FWIW, I fought the switch to Windows 10 too, worrying about software not running etc.

                  Every current program is compatible with Windows 10.

                  HTH

                  Jim
                  Thanks for those comments, Jim, that's good to know.

                  Alas, MS Flight Simulator (2004 and FSX) just won't work: this is a major pain as I really enjoy them and it's about the only PC simulation/game I play. It needs to connect to the Internet to download weather and it's less realistic to run it without that facility. Not to mention the many $$$ which I've invested in aircraft, scenery and other goodies.

                  I've tried installing both versions of MSFS on two Windows 10 machines: it wouldn't install on one at all, even with the backwards compatibility function, and while it installed on another, it wouldn't run. And that's trying the various tweaks and possibly dodgy software which have been promoted as fixes.

                  Apart from software issues, Windows 10 needs a new computer: money which I'd much rather spend on your "Anthology" speakers!

                  From the MS Windows 7/10 update advice page, I've put the most annoying bit in bold:

                  "While you could continue to use your PC running Windows 7, without continued software and security updates, it will be at greater risk for viruses and malware. Going forward, the best way for you to stay secure is on Windows 10. And the best way to experience Windows 10 is on a new PC. While it is possible to install Windows 10 on your older device, it is not recommended".

                  In other words, Microsoft is making you spend money - a lot of money - on something you may not need.


                  Geoff
                  Last edited by Geoff Millar; 01-21-2020, 12:20 AM.

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                  • #10
                    If your PC runs Win 7 fine, It'll run Win 10 fine. That being said, it sounds like many are running quite old hardware. $3,500 as quoted above would pretty much get you a top of the line gaming rig. For well under $1000, you can build a very nice desktop, with all the modern accouterments, and it'll be fast. Heck, you can get a refurbished lease return for just a few hundred, and have a decently modern PC. Personally, I can't stand a dog computer. Once you've had 10-second boot times, and near instant program starts, you'll wonder why you fought with an old PC for so long.

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                    • #11
                      $3500 is nuts. My Dell 5770 cost me $1k. 17 inch screen, i7 processor, SSD. It's considerably faster than my six year old HP desktop, so much so that I only fire the desktop up once a month or so just to keep it updated. On the issue of W7 versus W10, when W10 was first introduced and it was a free upgrade from W7 I did the upgrade and never regretted it for a minute. Where MS has cheaped out is with what software comes with W10. Stuff like Office and Word that used to come with it are now extra cost add-ons, but there's plenty of freeware that works just as well, LibreOffice being one example.
                      www.billfitzmaurice.com
                      www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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                      • #12
                        TBH - The only reason I run Windows at all, is I need to use software that will only run on Windows, and I need to have 100% compatibility with files and workflow at home as I use at work. Otherwise, I'd be Linux all the way. Software like Libre Office is very good, and if 95% compatibility with MS office was good enough, I wouldn't even bother with Microsoft stuff. There's a lot of open source programs that have versions that run on both Windows and Linux, and in every case, the Linux version is faster and often has better features.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by billfitzmaurice View Post
                          $3500 is nuts. My Dell 5770 cost me $1k. 17 inch screen, i7 processor, SSD. It's considerably faster than my six year old HP desktop, so much so that I only fire the desktop up once a month or so just to keep it updated. On the issue of W7 versus W10, when W10 was first introduced and it was a free upgrade from W7 I did the upgrade and never regretted it for a minute. Where MS has cheaped out is with what software comes with W10. Stuff like Office and Word that used to come with it are now extra cost add-ons, but there's plenty of freeware that works just as well, LibreOffice being one example.
                          That's Australian dollars, which have gone the way of banana republic dollars in recent years. But that's what it will cost us to replace what we have in terms of office and design software, flight sim products, bigger monitor, SSD drive storage, video card etc.

                          There are freeware alternatives to MS Office but I haven't found one which works quite as well. However, I haven't tried Libre Office so I'll check that out, thank you.

                          It's great that for most people, the change to W10 works well, it just doesn't for us.

                          Geoff

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Geoff Millar View Post
                            From the MS Windows 7/10 update advice page, I've put the most annoying bit in bold:

                            "While you could continue to use your PC running Windows 7, without continued software and security updates, it will be at greater risk for viruses and malware. Going forward, the best way for you to stay secure is on Windows 10. And the best way to experience Windows 10 is on a new PC. While it is possible to install Windows 10 on your older device, it is not recommended".

                            In other words, Microsoft is making you spend money - a lot of money - on something you may not need.
                            My main desktop has a motherboard from 2006 (even bought a used one last year when mine died). I've updated the CPU twice, installed fast RAM and an SSD. I upgraded to Win10. Each upgrade from Microsoft (forced, the one aspect I don't like) has usually improved it. Does most of what I need for general work. I have many PCs (used to have access to lots of throwaways). In fact, this PC was someone's throwaway.

                            I have a number of PCs networked, so I use each for different purposes (TeamViewer works superbly to control them from a single PC). The one issue with Win10 is that drivers for Delta sound cards stopped updates at Vista, though the Vista driver works on Win7. I actually just managed to get the Delta 410 to work with the Ultimate Equalizer on Win10, though limited to 44.1K sample rate. Works as a design and eventually auditioning PC. I have dedicated Win7 PCs for regular listening and no sample rate limitations. Win7 PCs are good for that, dedicated PCs that you don't use for routine work.

                            As far as installing Win10, you can't upgrade, but you can use a Win7 license on Win10 when you do a clean install. I've done that on many old, rejuvenated PCs.

                            dlr
                            WinPCD - Windows .NET Passive Crossover Designer

                            Dave's Speaker Pages

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                            • #15
                              About a month or so ago, I came across an amazing deal on a Lenovo laptop with really good specs. It has a good sized SSD drive. Holy crap! It boots up in less time than this machine (a nice 2018 Lenovo desktop) takes to wake up. Doesn't make a sound. No bloatware. It replaces a ten year old W7 laptop that was never fast or powerful, but it was cheap and reliable. I like W7, but I'm getting used to 10 and it seems to work well. Still, I'd have been plenty happy to stay with 7.

                              A friend who works in part of the IT realm told me a while back that he still uses XP at home, and hasn't had any trouble.

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