Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Saws, shops and such

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Dukk
    replied
    Cut a 2x6 about 8-10"long and trim one long side so there is a 1/2" hook at the bottom back edge. Then you have a push block that can run right over the blade. When it gets cut up, make a new one. I have been watching a bunch of Stumpy Nubs on youtube and he uses one a lot. Simple and free.

    For safer router use, consider a Fukuda Router Shield (google it). Very nice for small stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • STIchris722
    replied
    For a person who has watched a professional cabinet maker his entire life as well as operated the equipment personally, I like the board buddies with a push stick. Now with that said I really like the use of that Grr-ripper for a router table.....a lot actually.

    The issue I'll point out that deters me from using that gadget on a table saw is this....The operator should never have to leave the single spot they're standing until the material clears the blade, the blade stops spinning, or the blade is lowered under the table. Using that gadget I see a few possible negative things happening:
    1. Reaching over the blade from the operating position to the point where the piece clears the blade. Now the operator has all pressure on the gripper, arm over the blade, and weight shifting off their front foot. There is a possibility of weight shifting and slipping forward.
    2. Walking around the side of the saw to follow the piece with the gripper (prevents issue #1). I was always taught to never leave the operating position and if you need to then you need a spotting hand or off-feed table.

    Take it with a grain of salt. I am not saying my way is correct. It is how I view things and how I was taught. Money aside I see this as the safest possible route of operating a table saw.

    Leave a comment:


  • stephenmarklay
    commented on 's reply
    It did cross my mind about passing over the blade as well

  • stephenmarklay
    replied
    Originally posted by Psycoacoustics View Post

    My brother uses the Grr-ripper push block and LOVES it. Me, I like a stick. Way cheaper and when ya beat it up ya just make another.

    Different strokes. Have Fun, Mark
    Thank you! I used the stick today. I like that Grr-ripper as it has a very small passthrough for narrow cuts. I will at least give it a go.

    Leave a comment:


  • Psycoacoustics
    replied
    Originally posted by stephenmarklay View Post


    STIchris, I have been looking at the Grr-ripper push block. Do you have any experience with that vs the Board buddies? The push block is more versatile as I can use that with my router table as well.

    Thank you!
    My brother uses the Grr-ripper push block and LOVES it. Me, I like a stick. Way cheaper and when ya beat it up ya just make another.

    Different strokes. Have Fun, Mark

    Leave a comment:


  • tomzarbo
    replied
    Originally posted by dwk123 View Post

    Wow, Tom - those are spectacular. Are they written up anywhere?
    Thanks, here's a link on the project page at PE: http://projectgallery.parts-express....ion-headaches/

    Leave a comment:


  • STIchris722
    replied
    Originally posted by stephenmarklay View Post


    STIchris, I have been looking at the Grr-ripper push block. Do you have any experience with that vs the Board buddies? The push block is more versatile as I can use that with my router table as well.

    Thank you!
    I personally do not, but I know I have seen those in my dad's shop before. Never have I seen him use them though. The idea makes sense, but I personally don't like the idea of having my hand directly over the blade. They do look like they would work well and would definitely be cross-functional with a router table!

    Leave a comment:


  • dwk123
    replied
    Originally posted by tomzarbo View Post

    Maybe leave some money for a bandsaw down the line... curves are fun too!



    TomZ
    Wow, Tom - those are spectacular. Are they written up anywhere?

    Leave a comment:


  • stephenmarklay
    replied
    Originally posted by STIchris722 View Post

    On a table saw I 100 percent recommend getting 'Board Buddies'. See picture below. This prevents kickback better than any device I have ever seen or used.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	8fc50dd3-1b9d-4548-8f58-f9ade86bf23a.jpg
Views:	403
Size:	364.8 KB
ID:	1429956 Click image for larger version

Name:	A8358.jpg
Views:	390
Size:	544.7 KB
ID:	1429957

    STIchris, I have been looking at the Grr-ripper push block. Do you have any experience with that vs the Board buddies? The push block is more versatile as I can use that with my router table as well.

    Thank you!

    Leave a comment:


  • stephenmarklay
    replied
    Thank you Tom and those speakers are insane! I am looking forward to increasing my skill level but that level of build is not happening soon

    I finally picked up the saw today and I want to thank you Tom for first suggesting that I do that instead of router table. I will get the router table soon enough anyway.

    I picked up an older model Dewalt DWE7480. This is a middle of the road offering. It allows a little more rip capacity and has a different motor than the base 745. I wanted the larger and more capable DWE7491rs which has a wheeled stand that is very stable. It is hard to even make it wiggle really pushing on it. I was impressed by that. That one can also take a dado blade set and mine cannot. I do not do a lot of dados but I probably would have used that feature a lot if I had it. Nevertheless, I can do that with a router or even a crosscut sled. This saw was on clearance at lowes for $299.00 vs $499.00 for the larger saw. I figured I could get some goodies like a better miter gauge, board buddies etc and still come in under the $499 price.

    I am going to set it up and spend time adjusting it tomorrow. Once I am comfortable with it I am going make a crosscut sled straight away.


    Thanks again everyone for the knowledge you shared.

    Leave a comment:


  • tomzarbo
    replied
    QUOTE=billfitzmaurice;n1430237]

    Emergency room statistics will dispute that. With a radial arm the main danger is kick back, with a band saw the main danger is the loss of a finger or two. In both cases operator error is the root cause of course, but one is far more likely to screw up with a band saw by holding the work with your hands and getting fingers where they shouldn't be. On that I bet the most dangerous band saws aren't the big production versions, but small hobbyist types, where the parts being cut are small and one is most likely to cut their fingernails a wee bit too short.[/QUOTE]

    I bet table saw accidents are probably more grizzly but fewer, and band saw accidents are less traumatic, but more frequent... at least for the homeowner style saws. Me, I'm not nearly as afraid of my band saw as I am my table saw.

    ...But my dad's old Sears radial arm saw scared the stuffing out of me more than both of the others put together.

    For those who aren't aware, on a radial arm saw, you start the cut with the blade pushed back behind the fence. As the blade is spinning and you pull the handle to get the blade to enter the work piece, it seems as if it's trying to accelerate towards you, like if it catches on the work, it's coming at you in a hurry. In actuality with a square blade/fence and being careful, it rarely felt like it could actually accelerate through the cut as your hand/arm along with the heavy weight of the saw (and attached motor) keeps forward movement in check mostly. The individual teeth were more cutting down than forward, which is why it worked, but still, you can get into trouble with those things a LOT easier! And if I remember correctly, it took my father's saw like 45 seconds to spin down... freeze, like a statue!

    The blade spins the same as in today's compound miter saws, but with those, you start the cut with the blade up, and in front of the work piece... so you're pushing the blade into the work piece as you do with a table saw. Much better setup. I
    f it's a finish board, I sometimes even
    trim the top of the board real slow and careful to eliminate tear-out, and then go down into the meat of it to make a nice smooth cut. I feel like there's freedom with those saws.

    Ahh, just rambling. Dad and I tried to do a rip cut on his radial saw once, it worked, but it just didn't feel right to me... ind of spooked me a bit. It seemed like the long arm sticking out would have a hard time staying square to the fence. At least that way, you're 'pushing' the work into the cut, though.

    Just makes me appreciate modern woodworking tools.

    With all the great information presented and all the research Stephen is doing, I'm sure he'll get the right tools he needs to get his speaker building up to the next level pretty quick.

    Maybe leave some money for a bandsaw down the line... curves are fun too!

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0675 (Large).JPG
Views:	168
Size:	300.3 KB
ID:	1430250

    TomZ

    Leave a comment:


  • Carbon13
    replied
    Originally posted by stephenmarklay View Post
    Thank you Carbon13. I have looked at and thought about my options and I am going to stick with a more portable jobsite saw. It is just a lot less hassle for me. I know it won’t ever be a precision tool but I am going to spend the time to adjust it well, make a crosscut sled, perhaps a higher end miter. I will also make sure to get some of the mentioned board buddies, zero clearance plate etc.

    As far as the saws I am leaning toward the dewalt now. I have tinkered with them all. I wish the sawstop contractor saw was a little less $ as I would spend more but $1,399 vs $500 is a lot. Of course it wouldn’t seem that way after and accident.
    I hear you, tools are pricey! You can get really good used table saws for relatively little money and then upgrade them with a new fence and safety features like the microjig splitter. As long as you have a decent base to start with you can add to it over time (extend rails, router table, outfeed table etc). Just make sure the motor is decent and everything is running true and nothing is bent. Test all adjustments.

    Mine is an old delta contractor saw that I have evolved into a decent cabinet saw (or relatively close).

    But my next will be a sawstop for sure as I hope to do more woodworking posts retirement which is still about 10yrs away....not that I am counting;)

    Leave a comment:


  • billfitzmaurice
    replied
    Originally posted by jhollander View Post

    No way Bill, a bandsaw is way more safer than a radial arm saw.
    Emergency room statistics will dispute that. With a radial arm the main danger is kick back, with a band saw the main danger is the loss of a finger or two. In both cases operator error is the root cause of course, but one is far more likely to screw up with a band saw by holding the work with your hands and getting fingers where they shouldn't be. On that I bet the most dangerous band saws aren't the big production versions, but small hobbyist types, where the parts being cut are small and one is most likely to cut their fingernails a wee bit too short.

    Leave a comment:


  • stephenmarklay
    replied
    Thank you Carbon13. I have looked at and thought about my options and I am going to stick with a more portable jobsite saw. It is just a lot less hassle for me. I know it won’t ever be a precision tool but I am going to spend the time to adjust it well, make a crosscut sled, perhaps a higher end miter. I will also make sure to get some of the mentioned board buddies, zero clearance plate etc.

    As far as the saws I am leaning toward the dewalt now. I have tinkered with them all. I wish the sawstop contractor saw was a little less $ as I would spend more but $1,399 vs $500 is a lot. Of course it wouldn’t seem that way after and accident.

    Leave a comment:


  • Carbon13
    replied
    Lots of good advice here. My 2 cents:

    Like Bill, I inherited a delta saw with a mule fence. A good fence is crucial. However, there is no replacement for a good crosscut sled and there's lots of info available on how to make one.

    Safety should be a priority. Use board buddies and or feather boards. If no riving knife, add a zero clearance throat plate and microjig separator.

    I also added a router table to the extension on my saw. Best advice if doing this is spend the money on a good metal plate like incra. Don't buy a phenolic one, too much flex. I would Also look for a router with above table adjustment like a Triton, saves buying a lift and saves your back.

    Dust collection is always tricky. Cyclone separator is a must and easy to DIY one on a standard collector. Get a good filter so the collector doesn't act as a dust pump. And I built a fine air purifier that I run in my garage after a session to remove fine particles. Most of all, get a good respirator and get it fitted properly.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X