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Plate amp shared between two systems ???

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  • Plate amp shared between two systems ???

    I have a plate amp that I'm using the L rca input. If I have a second system in the room, I would like to connect the bass out rca to the R input. Is there any issue with signal from one system interfering with the equipment in the other? One system is HT, the other is for music. I was lucky recently, and found a used Outlaw receiver. I figured that I can swap speaker wires easily, and even the rca cables, but it would be nice to leave both cables connected to the sub amp.

  • #2
    In theory no problem. But what are you going to do about level matching, crossover points, etc? Unless they're identical between your two source receivers you're going to be messing with subwoofer settings every time you switch between them.

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    • #3
      The level matching is easy. I just adjust the level at the receiver. The Outlaw has adjustable high-pass options, so I could match that way as well. I like to tweak anyway. I'd rather leave the rca cables alone. Last night, I disconnected the one to the plate amp without turning off the equipment. I was lucky. Nothing bad happened.

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      • #4
        You won't damage the sources' outputs connecting one to the sub's L input and the other to the sub's R input. Even with both sources on and providing signal you would not cause damage. But you might create a ground loop causing hum. So I'd start testing your approach (this is DIY after all).

        Some subs recommend using the L input if you only have a source with one channel. Signal wise, it shouldn't make a difference to the plate amp. Internally, It combines the L-& R inputs to create the mono sub signal. So it will take a single signal from either side. Perhaps the L is recommended for auto-on detection circuitry or some other function.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Millstonemike View Post
          But you might create a ground loop causing hum. So I'd start testing your approach (this is DIY after all).
          I was going to suggest the same possible issue.

          It shouldn't be difficult to wire up a simple double pull double throw switch (On - Off - On) with the RCA inputs on opposing sides. This should isolate each system from the other with the very minor inconvenience of having to throw a switch whenever you change systems.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Millstonemike View Post
            You won't damage the sources' outputs connecting one to the sub's L input and the other to the sub's R input. Even with both sources on and providing signal you would not cause damage. But you might create a ground loop causing hum. So I'd start testing your approach (this is DIY after all).

            Some subs recommend using the L input if you only have a source with one channel. Signal wise, it shouldn't make a difference to the plate amp. Internally, It combines the L-& R inputs to create the mono sub signal. So it will take a single signal from either side. Perhaps the L is recommended for auto-on detection circuitry or some other function.
            I've wondered about the recommendation of using the L input. The auto detection circuitry comment makes sense. It probably costs less to monitor one input than two.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Blenton View Post

              I was going to suggest the same possible issue.

              It shouldn't be difficult to wire up a simple double pull double throw switch (On - Off - On) with the RCA inputs on opposing sides. This should isolate each system from the other with the very minor inconvenience of having to throw a switch whenever you change systems.
              I would be concerned about pops when switching, if it was something I made.

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              • #8
                I don't think I'm going to be doing this anyway now. Part of my reason was based on my belief that some of my analog sources sounded better than my digital sources, and I want to stream Netflix, etc, The streaming players all have digital outputs only on the equipment now. . Yesterday, I played with different combinations of receivers, amps, blu-ray players, and even cables, to decide which components I want to use in my living room system. I've been buying receivers for under $20 at thrift shops for he last month or so in order to help a friend setup multiple inexpensive systems at his house. It is quite amazing what can be done on the cheap this way. I also discovered that my living room is better for music than my smaller HT room. I compared Sony, Yamaha, and Denon receivers, as well as my Sherwood Newcastle pre -pro that I've used for years. The connection options are numerous. For my living room system, getting a combination that included good Dacs, amplifier, and bass management, was the goal. What made things complicated was having a second system that would get the leftover equipment. I managed to come up with two systems that should keep me happy.

                Just for an example. My buddies system could include the following. (Some of this stuff I'm keeping!)

                Sony streaming blu-ray player $6
                Yamaha receiver. $15
                Denon receiver $9
                KLH speakers $4
                Oppo dvd player with analog outputs $6
                Passive DVC 12" sealed sub-woofer (got this one free.)
                Total About $40

                The Yamaha has excellent bass management. ( 4th order slopes, and adjustable frequency. ) The sub out can connect to the analog inputs on the Denon which will power the dvc sub. ( 100 watts times two channels, if the sub is 8 ohm + 8 ohm.)

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