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Bagby Kairos build - need feedback

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  • #16

    Originally posted by fpitas View Post

    The braces sub-divide the panels into smaller sections. Make those sections different sizes, to spread the panel resonances.
    Do you think this fares any better? I removed double walls from the sides, and the vertical brace - this should open up a lot more volume and reduce 'sections'. My build is going to be 0.75in MDF, will this be enough bracing to withstand a 200hz crossover point between midrange and woofer?
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    • #17
      Originally posted by groker View Post


      Do you think this fares any better? I removed double walls from the sides, and the vertical brace - this should open up a lot more volume and reduce 'sections'. My build is going to be 0.75in MDF, will this be enough bracing to withstand a 200hz crossover point between midrange and woofer?
      Well, the idea wasn't to reduce the number of sections so much as to make them vary in size. As a rule of thumb with 3/4" MDF I try to brace every 7 inches max, or closer.
      Francis

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      • #18
        If your horizontal braces are at 10" - 10" - and 10" (on your bass module - vertically), it'd be better to stagger the distances some, like: 10" - 8" - & 12" (or 10" - 9" - & 11", even).

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        • #19


          Just thought I had to share this lucidly-written white paper. It provides insight into a respected designer's thought process to develop a passive crossover design with nearly minimum-phase performance yet suppresses acoustic lobes far better than a pure first-order design. Made only possible with state-of-the-art drivers, of course. He does it through an asymmetrical crossover, with the tweeter rolling very high-up and shallowly, before ultimately Sarkari Result Pnr Status 192.168.1.1 steepening sharply below the XO point. This topology plus a slanted baffle creates a very interesting non-waveguide speaker. This is IMO what the pre-buyover Thiel people should have done - instead of stubbornly clinging onto minimum-phase first-order electrical XOs, shoot for something with no phase rotation and much better lobing behaviour as a middle ground.
          Last edited by 5af734377e; 04-10-2020, 11:13 PM.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by 5af734377e View Post

            Just thought I had to share this lucidly-written white paper. It provides insight into a respected designer's thought process to develop a passive crossover design with nearly minimum-phase performance yet suppresses acoustic lobes far better than a pure first-order design. Made only possible with state-of-the-art drivers, of course. He does it through an asymmetrical crossover, with the tweeter rolling very high-up and shallowly, before ultimately steepening sharply below the XO point. This topology plus a slanted baffle creates a very interesting non-waveguide speaker. This is IMO what the pre-buyover Thiel people should have done - instead of stubbornly clinging onto minimum-phase first-order electrical XOs, shoot for something with no phase rotation and much better lobing behaviour as a middle ground.
            Hey, I knew a spambot named 5af734377e. Was that you?
            Francis

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