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Been gone a while. and have a question. Sawstop owners

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  • Been gone a while. and have a question. Sawstop owners

    I have not posted here for some time. I have been doing a lot of saw work in my shop. And looking to upgrade to a sawstop pro. I like the delta 7485 with how it's fence works, but wondering if anyone here as had used the sawstop pro. In particular accuracy. I do like the safety aspect, but also want some accuracy.

    Just another hobbyiest.

  • #2
    Very accurate, possibly the best cabinet saw made today.

    My previous saw was a Delta Unisaw.

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    • #3
      I could name you ten good reasons to buy one but can only count up to 9 3/4. I'll probably buy one even though I have a great cast iron cabinet saw.

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      • #4
        I have the SawStop CNS (contractor) with the T-Glide style fence that comes with the PCS. It's a very good fence and identical to the older Delta Biesemeyer fence. It's incredibly rigid and dead on accurate after calibrating the pointers to the ruler. Highly recommend.

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        • Gordy
          Gordy commented
          Editing a comment
          I have the exact set up. Have not calibrated the fence in years. Still square and still measures exactly as I set it up.I can shave 64ths with ease. The CNS is great for lighter work and building speakers would fall into tis category. I have even used it for large table tops. +1 for the reco.

      • #5
        Agreed Gordy. If you run into issues ripping thicker stock I suggest getting a 24 tooth ripping blade. I got one and all of the burning and motor overloads went away when working with 2.5" solid maple.

        I do wish I had a 3HP though... Definitely go with the 3HP if you can.

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        • #6
          Originally posted by kmibb View Post
          I have the SawStop CNS (contractor) with the T-Glide style fence that comes with the PCS. It's a very good fence and identical to the older Delta Biesemeyer fence. It's incredibly rigid and dead on accurate after calibrating the pointers to the ruler. Highly recommend.
          Close.

          Sawstop added a couple of improvements, the Sawstop fence has a 90º to the table adjustment with set screws, the Biesemeyer only had adjustment screws for parallel to the mitre slot. They also added nylon glide pads to the front of the fence body to ride against the angle iron rail so the fence didn't "flop" around like a Biesemeyer would when there was no tension on the cam handle (provided you set the correct clearance between the front angle iron and the square tube during set up).

          * Full disclosure, when Wood shows were a thing, I used to demo Sawstop at trade shows and I have been selling them (and ww'ing machinery) for many many years.

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          • #7
            I have been researching the daylights on 3 HP cabinet saws. The PCS is an excellent saw. ( with their upgraded fence) I have not heard many valid complaints. ( might check places like Lumberjocks for comments) Any saw with a proper riving knife is safer than our old ones, and their brake may cut you really bad, but most likely will not cut your hand off. I also like the Powermatic and Harvey. Harvey is a LOT cheaper. They are one of the four or so actual manufactures. ( even having made some of the sawstops) I love the features of the new Delta Unisaw, but the reports on the woodworking forums cause me to skip it for horrible quality only exceeded by their support. Grizzly and Jet are hit or miss. Laguna F3 is odd as it's distance from front edge to blade is very short. For now, sticking with my contractor saw modified into a cabinet with multiple ZCIs with different fixed splitters. Bought a Harvey C14 band saw and use it for a lot of things I might have done on the TS, so nothing safer than not using the TS. Spent my money on ambient air filters, lights, and other improvements. Remember, you can live without a couple of ringers, you can;t live without a coupple of lungs. Speakers? MDF. Most dangerous stuff to breather there is. N95 mask or better!

            I was blaming my 1 3/4 contractor as being under-powered until I threw away my expensive combo blades. Now I run 24 tooth rip, 60 or 80 tooth crosscut. Top quality. Ammana, CMT, Frued, etc. No big box stuff. I can rip 3 inch oak with no problem. i WANT a new saw, but can't really justify it yet.

            Saw saftey features, in order: Brain, splitter, brake.

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            • #8
              Originally posted by tvrgeek View Post
              ......

              Saw saftey features, in order: Brain, splitter, brake.
              There was an article in Fine Woodworking (I think) years ago that said in the majority of woodworking accidents, right before the accident the person thought maybe they shouldn't be doing what they were doing. I've taken that to heart, and any time I'm not 100% sure that what I'm doing is safe I stop and evaluate if there isn't a safer way to do it.
              It is estimated that one percent of the general population are psychopaths - New Criminologist: Understanding Psychopaths

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              • #9
                Originally posted by mattk View Post

                There was an article in Fine Woodworking (I think) years ago that said in the majority of woodworking accidents, right before the accident the person thought maybe they shouldn't be doing what they were doing. I've taken that to heart, and any time I'm not 100% sure that what I'm doing is safe I stop and evaluate if there isn't a safer way to do it.
                ABSOLUTELY! Sleds and jigs. Riving knives etc. Scariest thing I ever had to do was taper some table legs on those cheap V shape gigs. I made a table to clamp the work to. No scary. Squaring up small pieces is another easy to get kickback and hurt.

                There was a comment on Lumber jocks about a SawStop that saved a guys thumb today. I guess my biggest issue with SS is their over aggressive efforts to lobby making only their saw legal. At least it is a very good saw. Now they are owned by Festool, don't expect that to change.

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                • #10
                  Welcome back! Hope all is well

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                  • #11
                    Awesome saw. Can't put a price on safety. But remember-you still have to look both ways before you cross the street!

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                    • #12
                      Throwing my two-cents in for what it's worth. I've got a sawstop jobsite saw (in the stage of my life still where mobility and low cost are the driving choices to power tool selection). While I could definitely say I could use a little more power, the only time I've ever had a problem with the saw in general was ripping a relatively thin piece of thick walnut and having it bind up on the blade (one of those times where, in hindsight, probably shouldn't have been doing what I was doing). Just based on the quality of their "lesser" tools, I can't imagine there would be any problem with the pro tools. I personally wouldn't trade my saw for anything but an upgraded sawstop. Knowing in the back of my mind that, should my precautions fail me, there's one more layer of safety between me and a visit to a surgeon, is totally worth it.

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                      • #13
                        Originally posted by dmboston View Post
                        Throwing my two-cents in for what it's worth. I've got a sawstop jobsite saw (in the stage of my life still where mobility and low cost are the driving choices to power tool selection). While I could definitely say I could use a little more power, the only time I've ever had a problem with the saw in general was ripping a relatively thin piece of thick walnut and having it bind up on the blade (one of those times where, in hindsight, probably shouldn't have been doing what I was doing). Just based on the quality of their "lesser" tools, I can't imagine there would be any problem with the pro tools. I personally wouldn't trade my saw for anything but an upgraded sawstop. Knowing in the back of my mind that, should my precautions fail me, there's one more layer of safety between me and a visit to a surgeon, is totally worth it.
                        What blade were you using? I was unhappy with my contractor 1 3/4 HP when using a combo blade. Saving up for a PCS or Harvey. But a proper 24 tooth CMT rip blade totally solved the power problem. I can rim 3 inch oak or walnut. Even rip nice wet PT. Nothing building speakers will provide any stress at all. Get a 60 or 80 crosscut for ply and MDF.

                        That said, anything smaller than a contractor size scares me. I just do not feel comfortable with the new job site saws. Kind of why I really want a bigger heavier 3 HP cabinet saw. About the only thing that can slow it down is if I try to cut a wide dado too deep in one pass.

                        Now, If I were a business owner, or just the provider of a job-site tool, there is no way I would use anything BUT a SS. Risk of who knows who using it and an injury is too great for one's liability. I am amazed insurance companies have not put pressure here. In my shop, it is up to me. I am not going to sue myself.

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