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  • 3rutu5
    replied
    Cheers Jake, I agree with that, I feel even though the graph looks nice and workable at the size I did, I did notice the difference between my test run using a much larger pvc pipe was that sounded better.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jake
    replied
    Just thought I'd chime in on my experience with the ce65w. I built a couple MT with them, and they are impressive, but do require alot of space given their size. Like most small speakers they sound best when turned up. The last one I did I used a 0.1cf internal volume enclosure for one speaker. I used a 1.2mh inductor, but could even go 1.5. I used .75" pvc, tuned to 80hz. Again, i pared with a tweeter, but if fullrange I'd throw a .8mh or 1mh coil on it. Adequate volume and bass considering.

    Leave a comment:


  • zx82net
    replied
    Originally posted by 3rutu5 View Post

    Cheers mate, i made a devilant phantom clone where i went 5mm thick walls and went 3mm inner and outer walls so it just plotted completely solid. took forever and i had a few fails with warping, but just felt quite a bit more solid than when i went a 10mm wall with 40-50% infill.

    The interesting part of 3d printing (which is also the most frustrating) is getting the slicer to work for you, i'm finding it a steep learning curve and have a heap to learn, but i'll get there.

    I quite like that tangbang module, is that the one with the passive radiator on the back? i looked at a few of those, but it was looking like mid 100's to get it to australia and just wasnt worth it, which funnily enough probably started this fancination with 3d printing tiny speakers
    Yeah, that's the largest of their modules with the PR on the back, around $30USD from PE.

    I feel for you having to deal with shipping. I used to live in the UK and dreamed of having PE without the shipping and import taxes. Now I live in the US, and loudspeakers are becoming a bigger hobby for me, mainly because it is so easy to get bits to play with.

    Leave a comment:


  • 3rutu5
    replied
    Originally posted by tom_b View Post
    Nice projects. Well done 3rutu5, even if they didn't turn out exactly as you hoped. You will get it dialed in, over time.


    I think there is a future for 3d printing and sonotube. Detailed endcaps and ports in PLA; volume with sonotube.

    P-E should encourage the evolution of 3d printed enclosures.

    I've been working on several, but none finished. A few things I've come up with are:

    - construction adhesive seems to do a good job gluing PLA end caps to sonotube
    - 3d printed parts can be made with chamfered edges and effectively "welded" with a 3d pen, like using a MIG welder to join steel. Pre-heat the parts with a heat gun for improved adhesion.
    - Walls can be printed hollow and filled with GreatStuff window and door foam. I haven't tested this for reduced box resonance yet, but the technique is reasonably simple and works well.


    Obviously, nobody is going to 3d print an enclosure for a pizza sized subwoofer that weighs 50# for the driver alone. 3d printing is more the domain of small, desktop, speakers for a PC or stands, ports, and other accessories for wooden speakers.
    cheers

    yep its one of those things that people dont really do a lot online with 3d printing for speakers, i've seen a few really cool ones, but then they do a sound test and it just doesnt quite sound right. I think my phantom clone was taking about 75-100 hours by the end and that was for a 0.05cuft enclosure, granted there were a few bits to it and had a few failures, but i have thought about going big, but would be restricted by my two print beds (220x220x250mm or 255x360mm)

    Leave a comment:


  • 3rutu5
    replied
    Originally posted by zx82net View Post
    Great work 3rutu5.
    My tips for 3D printing practical things, like speakers:
    • Allow yourself room to work, leave plenty of room for wiring in prototypes, squeeze to size once you have stuff working
    • Prototype; print test pieces with single wall and 5% infill for fit checks.
    • Splitting the design in sections allows you adjust and reprint parts rather than the whole thing
    • Allow plenty of surface area for glued joints, threaded interfaces are even better
    • If possible make a feature of joints rather than trying to hide them, filament color swaps can help
    I typically use 8 - 12mm wall thickness depending on size of the panel.

    This is a housing I designed for a sealed Tang Band module, using threaded joints, I used a few mm of gold filament at the joint between the two parts:
    Cheers mate, i made a devilant phantom clone where i went 5mm thick walls and went 3mm inner and outer walls so it just plotted completely solid. took forever and i had a few fails with warping, but just felt quite a bit more solid than when i went a 10mm wall with 40-50% infill.

    The interesting part of 3d printing (which is also the most frustrating) is getting the slicer to work for you, i'm finding it a steep learning curve and have a heap to learn, but i'll get there.

    I quite like that tangbang module, is that the one with the passive radiator on the back? i looked at a few of those, but it was looking like mid 100's to get it to australia and just wasnt worth it, which funnily enough probably started this fancination with 3d printing tiny speakers

    Leave a comment:


  • 3rutu5
    replied
    Originally posted by Troles View Post
    It looks awesome, great job. If only the trend were to make speakers bigger and with less bass, everything would be so much easier! You mentioned you were running it mono. Does that mean 1) you’re only running one side of the amp, 2) your amp allows you to run both legs together, or converted to mono, or 3)something other?

    I am waiting on parts from P.E. And slow boat to build similar. Such better sound and power from 12v than the 5v amps, but the 3 batteries for the 12v gets large.
    yeah you got me there i just ran one of the channels. Some other low voltage builds i've seen people cross the input jack and put a resistor on it to go true mono.

    in the projects thread i have a bluetooth speaker (green one in the image above) that is running a 5v setup like this blue one. One speaker pointing downwards and being 360 degree sound.

    Leave a comment:


  • 3rutu5
    replied
    Originally posted by tomzarbo View Post
    That came out pretty good 3rutu5.

    The rocker switch goes with the overall look of the thing if you ask me. It just looks nice. More like a commercial product... I mean that as a compliment.

    I seem to always have issues of some type with this small stuff -- you know about most of them -- and they do rarely go together and just work right. That's why posing this stuff is really helpful for others who read but don't post... probably a bunch of folks learning from our 'discoveries' we may never know about.

    There is a special type of frustration when the tiny bits that you're working with are so small you kind of don't know where to put them. All those wires! So many wires!!!
    My latest radio has so many lines in it it looks like a robotic bird tried to make a nest with them. You try to double-check all your connections before flipping the switch and half loose your mind, not to mention your vision, and just say "hope I wired everything right... here goes!" It doesn't even bother me anymore when it doesn't work... I'm just happy if I don't smell smoke or see fire. My wife wonders why I order "A few" of each thing instead of just the one... 'Spares' I say to her.

    I'm exaggerating just a tiny little bit... but I do feel your pain brother!

    Regarding the walls, could you just mix up some 5 min. epoxy and spread it in there with a flag shaped applicator?

    Anyway, it looks good and I know you'll get it buttoned down soon.

    TomZ
    haha, thanks Tom, i know i say my last, but i bought a second printer and have a bit of a bug there lol. Even with a 100mm internal diameter and it about 150mm high, i was still running out of room its like the more i planned into it the parts decided otherwise. I bought about 30 of those rocker switches for cheap and decided to hit it with some white spray paint, could have prepped it a bit more but im generally happy.

    i'm feeling a bit lazy, but was intending to upload a sound test later on.

    Leave a comment:


  • Troles
    replied
    It looks awesome, great job. If only the trend were to make speakers bigger and with less bass, everything would be so much easier! You mentioned you were running it mono. Does that mean 1) you’re only running one side of the amp, 2) your amp allows you to run both legs together, or converted to mono, or 3)something other?

    I am waiting on parts from P.E. And slow boat to build similar. Such better sound and power from 12v than the 5v amps, but the 3 batteries for the 12v gets large.

    Leave a comment:


  • tom_b
    replied
    Beautiful.

    Leave a comment:


  • zx82net
    replied
    Great work 3rutu5.
    My tips for 3D printing practical things, like speakers:
    • Allow yourself room to work, leave plenty of room for wiring in prototypes, squeeze to size once you have stuff working
    • Prototype; print test pieces with single wall and 5% infill for fit checks.
    • Splitting the design in sections allows you adjust and reprint parts rather than the whole thing
    • Allow plenty of surface area for glued joints, threaded interfaces are even better
    • If possible make a feature of joints rather than trying to hide them, filament color swaps can help
    I typically use 8 - 12mm wall thickness depending on size of the panel.

    This is a housing I designed for a sealed Tang Band module, using threaded joints, I used a few mm of gold filament at the joint between the two parts:

    Leave a comment:


  • tomzarbo
    replied
    That came out pretty good 3rutu5.

    The rocker switch goes with the overall look of the thing if you ask me. It just looks nice. More like a commercial product... I mean that as a compliment.

    I seem to always have issues of some type with this small stuff -- you know about most of them -- and they do rarely go together and just work right. That's why posing this stuff is really helpful for others who read but don't post... probably a bunch of folks learning from our 'discoveries' we may never know about.

    There is a special type of frustration when the tiny bits that you're working with are so small you kind of don't know where to put them. All those wires! So many wires!!!
    My latest radio has so many lines in it it looks like a robotic bird tried to make a nest with them. You try to double-check all your connections before flipping the switch and half loose your mind, not to mention your vision, and just say "hope I wired everything right... here goes!" It doesn't even bother me anymore when it doesn't work... I'm just happy if I don't smell smoke or see fire. My wife wonders why I order "A few" of each thing instead of just the one... 'Spares' I say to her.

    I'm exaggerating just a tiny little bit... but I do feel your pain brother!

    Regarding the walls, could you just mix up some 5 min. epoxy and spread it in there with a flag shaped applicator?

    Anyway, it looks good and I know you'll get it buttoned down soon.

    TomZ

    Leave a comment:


  • tom_b
    replied
    Nice projects. Well done 3rutu5, even if they didn't turn out exactly as you hoped. You will get it dialed in, over time.


    I think there is a future for 3d printing and sonotube. Detailed endcaps and ports in PLA; volume with sonotube.

    P-E should encourage the evolution of 3d printed enclosures.

    I've been working on several, but none finished. A few things I've come up with are:

    - construction adhesive seems to do a good job gluing PLA end caps to sonotube
    - 3d printed parts can be made with chamfered edges and effectively "welded" with a 3d pen, like using a MIG welder to join steel. Pre-heat the parts with a heat gun for improved adhesion.
    - Walls can be printed hollow and filled with GreatStuff window and door foam. I haven't tested this for reduced box resonance yet, but the technique is reasonably simple and works well.


    Obviously, nobody is going to 3d print an enclosure for a pizza sized subwoofer that weighs 50# for the driver alone. 3d printing is more the domain of small, desktop, speakers for a PC or stands, ports, and other accessories for wooden speakers.

    Leave a comment:


  • 3rutu5
    replied
    Assembled it this morning and like most of the projects I build there was an issue. Well two to be honest

    First was the LBB battery board and the Panasonic 18650's I bought won't fit in the caddy, the battery itself looks like it is bigger as it has a protection circuit.

    Second I think the 3d print body needs to be thicker, 3-5mm might be too thin

    I think the tinysine amp would be better if I had more power as they are 8watts @ 4ohm and the CE65w's are 8 ohm drivers. Also I think the project would sound better with a ND65 driver as they really perform well for the size (providing they had more than the current power output)

    I lined the roof with some of that egg crate acoustic foam I had lying around and that was it as it sounded a bit lacking with anything more. The ports just slid in and I cut the end with 45deg to work better with the driver placement
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • 3rutu5
    replied
    Yeah two pieces in total, feel like maybe the walls maybe too thin but hey it took 20-25hrs to print it all.

    I have only tested my smaller one where it's the size of a 500ml can and it was a thumb suck...not a lot of thought went into it lol. As for the mesh, my last one had 2mm holes and the bigger one might be 2 or 3mm I can't recall but don't remember it doing too much to the sound

    Got too excited and painted it without too much prep work and it now need to sand it back and give it another go

    Leave a comment:


  • zx82net
    replied
    That's looking good, is it just two pieces in total?

    Did you do any experimentation on the conical reflector positioning? I'm working on a mini omni-directional speaker, I built this prototype for trying different reflector heights, but I haven't got around to doing any response measurements on it yet.

    Also, have you tested out the performance of the perforated grille, is there any sign of hissing at high volume? I'm interested in trying something similar.

    Luke

    Leave a comment:

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