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  • Improving Commercial Speaker Boxes....

    Hello Audio Experts!

    My plan is to put new drivers in an old 2-way box, which will be modified for the new drivers & for better sound.

    I have to make my first routered baffles. My previous speakers used 1/8" panel over the real baffle to get the drivers flush. Now I have a router, and 3/4" red oak to cut for the woofer, which will attach to the existing baffle. I see two methods for cutting my baffle:
    1) Measure the full diameter of the driver, Using a circle jig make a shallow cut for the driver lip, and then lessen the diameter & cut the full hole in the baffle.
    2) Cut the driver hole using a circle jig, and then use a rabbet bit to to reduce the baffle by 1/8" around the hole for the driver lip.
    Pls advise.

    If someone could link to or describe the best router bits for this job, I would appreciate it!
    Also, if you know of an especially good link to a guide for making flush baffles....

    Murf

  • #2
    I use option 1. First pass using a 3/4" straight / flat bit to do the recess, then the 1/4" straight bit for the hole cut using a Jasper jig. For the recess, the markings on the jig don't work obviously, so I always caliper the radius and check with the actual driver before doing the hole. I use a cheap straight bit, but there's some debate on the fancier spiral up / down cut bits that are probably quite a bit nicer.
    Electronics engineer, woofer enthusiast, and musician.
    Wogg Music
    Published projects: PPA100 Bass Guitar Amp, ISO El-Cheapo Sub, Indy 8 2.1 powered sub, MicroSat, SuperNova Minimus

    Comment


    • #3
      Jasper jig only increments in 1/16, so not always a good fit. I have a DIY slide adjustable jig.
      The cleanest cut is a down spiral but unless cutting some exotic, no big deal.

      When looking for specific woodworking skills, might I suggest woodworking forums? Sure, we are all woodworkers, but you learn a lot more from the fulltime pros.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by littlebear View Post
        Hello Audio Experts!

        My plan is to put new drivers in an old 2-way box, which will be modified for the new drivers & for better sound.

        I have to make my first routered baffles. My previous speakers used 1/8" panel over the real baffle to get the drivers flush. Now I have a router, and 3/4" red oak to cut for the woofer, which will attach to the existing baffle. I see two methods for cutting my baffle:
        1) Measure the full diameter of the driver, Using a circle jig make a shallow cut for the driver lip, and then lessen the diameter & cut the full hole in the baffle.
        2) Cut the driver hole using a circle jig, and then use a rabbet bit to to reduce the baffle by 1/8" around the hole for the driver lip.
        Pls advise.

        If someone could link to or describe the best router bits for this job, I would appreciate it!
        Also, if you know of an especially good link to a guide for making flush baffles....

        Murf
        I'm in agreement with wogg and do #1. My Freud rabbeting bit has half a dozen different bearings to change the rabbet size, but will only go up to 1/2". For any decent size woofer, that is typically not enough.

        Comment


        • #5
          I do the rebate first with the 1/4" downspiral bit in multiple passes. Less confusing for me. Very shallow first cut to avoid splintering. Cutting good holes takes a bit of practice, suggest you practice on scrap until you get a feel for the tools and method. Many things can go wrong.

          Comment


          • #6
            You can get around the Kaspersky jigs 1/16 increments by using a 32th inch bit, such as a 9/32. A 32th should be fine enough of a graduation.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by wogg View Post
              I use option 1. First pass using a 3/4" straight / flat bit to do the recess, then the 1/4" straight bit for the hole cut using a Jasper jig. For the recess, the markings on the jig don't work obviously, so I always caliper the radius and check with the actual driver before doing the hole. I use a cheap straight bit, but there's some debate on the fancier spiral up / down cut bits that are probably quite a bit nicer.
              Thanks Folks,

              Would this be a good example of a 3/4" straight/flat bit:
              https://www.lowes.com/pd/Bosch-3-4-i...er-Bit/1081969
              And this a good example of a 1/4" straight bit for cutting the hole:
              https://www.lowes.com/pd/Bosch-1-4-i...er-Bit/1095801

              Are Rockler bits good, pls?

              TIA! Murf

              Comment


              • #8
                Those are the exact bits I've got, Lowe's is real close by They'll do the job.

                I believe Rockler stuff is higher quality, but I'm a bit of a woodworking hack so add grain of salt.
                Electronics engineer, woofer enthusiast, and musician.
                Wogg Music
                Published projects: PPA100 Bass Guitar Amp, ISO El-Cheapo Sub, Indy 8 2.1 powered sub, MicroSat, SuperNova Minimus

                Comment


                • #9
                  Does anyone like this jig, pls?

                  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

                  or:
                  "
                  I made one out of a piece of 1/2" plywood. There should be two threaded holes in the router deck plate for mounting. Drill 2 screw holes in the plywood (countersink for head clearance) and a large one in the middle for the bit to clear. I just use finishing nails as the peg and drill a new peg hole in the plywood for each measurement.. Measuring from the outside bit edge. Barely any money or time spent." (DrewsBrews)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It looks like the smallest HOLE you can cut with that jig is 2", using a 1/4" bit. The description references the size of the smallest circle as 1.5". Adding 1/2" gives you 2" smallest hole.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Yeah but, even my tweet wants a 4" hole...?
                      Woof needs 7&5/32" (182mm).

                      Comment


                      • a4eaudio
                        a4eaudio commented
                        Editing a comment
                        The Jasper jig goes down to 2 1/4". Anything smaller and I just use a hole saw and/or Forstener bits.

                      • djg
                        djg commented
                        Editing a comment
                        There are 2 Jasper jigs. The small one goes from 1" to 7 1/2".

                    • #12
                      +1 on what ugly woofer said. A Jasper Jig with a 1/4" spiral upcut bit and a 9/32" straight bit will give you the ability to get within 1/32" diameter of your target. (The jig in post #9 may be fine, it has good reviews.)
                      Spiral cutting bits are nice because they are MADE for cutting and will last longer than straight bits. The upcut bit will clear out the sawdust and chips as you go, but a downcut bit would be better if you veneer and then route your holes.

                      Check how to set the depth of your router (maybe find some YouTube videos). With my DeWalt plunge router I can put some gasket tape on the edge of the driver and put it into the depth adjustment guide and get the depth pretty accurate.

                      Comment


                      • djg
                        djg commented
                        Editing a comment
                        A downcut spiral is less likely to cause splintering on the hole. I used an upcut once, on some Baltic Birch that splintered badly. YMMV.

                    • #13
                      I have a Dewalt DW621 plunge router, so I think it's capable of doing everything I need. I think I got it for the same price that I'm paying for each router bit. I've only used it once, to put a bull-nose on a shelf, and I have to do the same to my boards tomorrow for a new stereo cabinet.

                      Murf

                      Comment


                      • #14
                        Anything with veneer I tape, been burned in the past even with down spiral and straight bits. Down spiral bit for the first pass and then up spiral to finish for more depth per pass and better chip clearing

                        Comment


                        • djg
                          djg commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I stick with down cut and blow the chips out.

                      • #15
                        Hi Folks,

                        Um

                        TIA! Murf
                        Last edited by littlebear; 11-19-2020, 03:24 PM.

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