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Help me pick a 4-5" midrange.............

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  • Paul Ebert
    replied
    Originally posted by tvrgeek View Post
    ... The Dayton 2 inch dome seems to be highly rated where the Morell is universally not.
    Are you referring to the Dayton RS52 and the Morel MDM55? If so, I'd say that the consensus is that the RS52 is, at best, controversial and the MDM55 universally admired. I can't remember anyone speaking or writing negative things about the Morel. Also, the RS52 is reported to have quality problems of late.

    Leave a comment:


  • Regore
    replied
    Grs makes an excellent 4-1/2 replacement for the old pioneer h/d drivers. Keeps up with my 15" woofers fine.
    I'm using it as a midrange but could also be used as a mid bass. 91db spl and very affordable.

    Leave a comment:


  • dst
    replied
    Roger: You may want to look at the Morel or PE dome mids. I would also consider SB Acoustics mids. If your hearing is now cut off around 5K, instead of the ribbon you may look at crossing over from the Usher fairly low to a full range driver. Make sure to give the Trout Quintet a spin on the turntable when done. At age 64 a recent hearing test had me still good to about 12-13K, which made me happy. Not too much fishing for me in recent years. Will retire in the months ahead and significantly ramp up the days on the water in 2021. I have wrapped up a few new rods in anticipation. I will need to find some old phone cord to tie up a few nymphs! Enjoy the music.

    Leave a comment:


  • Geoff Millar
    commented on 's reply
    Flush mounting those would be a pain, I think.

    Many Peerless drivers have that shaped frame but can be flush mounted, as the frame is thin and designed to be surface mounted anyway. I tried several times to flush mount the SB16pfc, which also has an awkward shaped frame, and gave up!

    Geoff

  • fpitas
    replied
    Originally posted by Roger Hill View Post
    Would an MTMW using these cause more brain damage than a relatively sane old guy should take on? Particularly don't like the truncated frames but I am sure that I could ultimately figure it out.

    https://www.parts-express.com/scan-s...BoCO0MQAvD_BwE
    I think that an MTM of some sort is your best bet, if detail retrieval is your thing. My experience is that you get a more "focused" sound, almost like headphones. Probably from the restricted vertical dispersion. Truncated frames will allow you to get the minimum driver-driver distance in an MTM.

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  • Roger Hill
    replied
    Would an MTMW using these cause more brain damage than a relatively sane old guy should take on? Particularly don't like the truncated frames but I am sure that I could ultimately figure it out.

    https://www.parts-express.com/scan-s...BoCO0MQAvD_BwE

    Leave a comment:


  • Roger Hill
    commented on 's reply
    please tell me how you rate those two drivers for ability to resolve complicated detail without sounding harsh. Which do you prefer? Of the 25, I would also like to know which one I referred to.........

  • Roger Hill
    commented on 's reply
    Paul: I am referring to the Ashkenazy/Philharmonia recording in which the 2nd movement is 7:48 long. I have a perfectly atrocious recording of Beethoven's 9th (Boulez conducting) which is some seven or eight minutes shorter than the Szell recording. Absolutely awful!

  • Paul K.
    commented on 's reply
    In my CD of Mozart's 21st piano concerto, the second movement is only 6:12 long!?
    Paul

  • tvrgeek
    commented on 's reply
    But they hear best the comment made across the room at a noisy party.

    My big band CDs were what made my wife run from the room until I finally built speakers good enough. I knew it was the speakers as we could go to a club and hear live Jazz much louder with no problem. Tweeters. Tweeters were the key. HD and more important IMD from breakup.

    I used to think transients were HF and not bass, "slow" base being insufficient midrange. I have learned better. They help, but for tympany, that initial wave front matters. Moving lots of air fast. Low Q bass drivers are the key.

  • oldloder
    replied
    Would also love to know which Concerto you've referred to ... I listen to the TB 1337's and AC 130F1's daily and would be happy to tell you if I can hear those pizzicato delights.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Lee
    commented on 's reply
    They hear EVERYTHING . . .

    :D

  • Roger Hill
    replied
    To Geoff, Billet and tvgeek: While I am fussy about the high frequency end of the spectrum, I don't hear it at all. I can appreciate what the mic picks up and how I know it is there is that I feel it. The very high frequencies are what gives the spl pressure wave its suddenness. The loud strike of a timpani has a lot of HF content, I don't have to hear the hf to know it was there, I react to the suddenness of the arrival of compressed air and the sound of the lower frequencies. My hearing now cuts off at about 5,000 Hz. Bring up an online tone generator and you will be amazed at what a high frequency 6,000 Hz really is. Based upon years of "training," my brain fills in the vibration information that is concomitant with the pressure change. Not hearing above that doesn't diminish my enjoyment of the music at all. The only part of a beloved music passage where I lament the loss of hearing is in the 4th movement of Beethoven's 9th (Chorale) symphony. After a tremendous crescendo and pause, the orchestra comes back very softly with the triangle beating time. I can no longer hear the triangle and I miss it. In another recording, a bass drum is used rather than the triangle. Works for me. As you age, there will be other physical things that you will miss more than your ability to hear high frequencies. But there are also benefits to getting old: I can't die young, I am immune to early onset Alzheimer's and if I ever buy a new car, it may come with a lifetime warranty .........;-) BTW, my wife is the envy of the bat community. If I put on a solo violin, she runs from the room plugging her ears. I am convinced that she can hear 25 kHz and she doesn't enjoy classical music at all.

    Leave a comment:


  • tvrgeek
    replied
    Originally posted by Billet View Post
    It may be too large for your application, but the Dayton PM180 could be a good candidate. I have some PM220s and they clearly have a more detailed midrange than any of my other lower cost drivers.
    Really efficient, but looks hard to tame if used above about 1800 or so. I was looking at some of the drivers marketed as full range like Mark, Fostex and Fountek. The Dayton 2 inch dome seems to be highly rated where the Morell is universally not. I am also looking at the Peerless ceramic 1 1/8 dome to just lower the crossover enough I don't need the mid. My current living room are 7 inch Seas with 1 inch domes @ 1700. Flat too low for a 1 inch. I played with some Silver Flutes cutting out the dust cap and putting in phase plugs. Made them a lot better, just not as good as much better drivers. Physics, not magic.

    I used to hear above 22K. I have been pretty careful not going to Who concerts stoned, but time does get to us and the inner ear fluid thickens... My wife can still hear like a dog making her quite sensitive to midrange distortion that is now above my hearing.

    Eventually my stereo will be a Sony table radio in the nursing home. Keeping one on the shelf actually.

    Leave a comment:


  • Geoff Millar
    commented on 's reply
    I know and love the later Mozart Concertos, but I can't think of the one referred to in your first post, I'll just have to listen to them all again, what a drag!

    All of my recordings of those works are relatively old, either LPs or CD transfers of recordings from the 50s and 60s.

    The oldest is the 1951 Mozart 21st by Dinu Lipatti, great performance but 78-era mono sound. That recording sounds 'better' on my Classix II - the DC160 in which is often derided as having high distortion - than on our reference speakers which use the low distortion RS180P. The hiss and crackle of the recording is less obvious on the Classix. However, I still hear all the music on either speaker, but maybe the recording doesn't bring out the subtleties of the orchestra as well as a later recording.

    An A/B comparison of the music is going to have to be done.

    The recording of the Bach Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin by Julia Fischer is also a good test for speaker quality; as well as being a great performance, the sound is beautiful and will showcase the quality of your system.

    I add that you're lucky to still have such good hearing, I'm a baby boomer and can only hear up to about 10,000 Hz.

    Geoff
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