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OT: time for a new table saw?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Steve Lee View Post
    Doesn't the far-end of your fence need to clamp down to the table in order to use that Roller clamping System?
    Not all fences do that . . .
    I don't see a fence that doesn't clamp at both ends being the safest idea.
    I like that feed roller jig a lot! Any idea where I can buy the roller clamps?
    https://www.amazon.com/Woodstock-W11...a-496781917612
    Be sure to get the correct rotation. They only turn in the direction that the wood feeds so when you let go of the wood it can't kick back. I also have a router table built into one side of my saw table, which can be used with my Mule fence as well, along with the rollers. It looks like the picture here: https://www.mulecab.com/

    It's the only safe method for making stile and rail doors and raised panels. The accessories I have allow me to do anything I need to with a basic saw I bought 20 years ago for $100.
    www.billfitzmaurice.com
    www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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    • #17
      They just don't make them like they used to. Replacing machinery is a PITA. I inherited an anvil from my grandfather and it's basically the only tool I own that I don't think I will ever need to replace.

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      • #18
        You should try one of the new cordless anvils. Total game changer....

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        • #19
          Originally posted by LIDAR View Post
          You should try one of the new cordless anvils. Total game changer....
          Haha!

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          • #20
            Originally posted by gavinator68 View Post
            Paul,

            I missed your question regarding the latest Uni-Saw's.............personally, I would never spend that kind of money on a TS. Having spent my fair share of time as a machinist, I consider the TS to be a rotating blade with a flat table and square fence that STAYS that way. I just don't see it being anything more. As simplistic as my view may be it also forces me to approach the tool in a unique manner. I respect its inherent challenges and tweak them to my needs. I just want to cut something as square as I need. Nothing more. Often I will use the bandsaw to rip anything other than plywood. This is by far the safest way to rip anything, esp hardwoods. If I am making speaker enclosures out of panel, it will be the TS that I reach for. Always mindful of keeping my finners out of the rotating thing!

            OH...........and McMaster-Carr is your friend.

            Cheers,

            David
            My concern about the Uni-Saw is if the quality has gone down and if they are still even in business. The one that's available looks basically new, has a 36" fence and 3HP motor and is about the same price as a 36" 1.75HP Saw-Stop contractors saw. If the quality is good, it seems like a good deal.

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            • #21
              Paul,

              The Delta Uni-Saw of today is NOT the same Delta Uni-Saw of Rockwell cir. 1980. They are currently owned by one of the Mfg's in Taiwan. I cannot speak to the quality of these new saws, only to that of the old. I would have to handle one up close and personal to make that call. I will say this about tools and safety............for me the only thing I would like to have on my 20 year old tool is a riving knife that raises and lowers with the blade. Mine is fixed in height. As for all the manner of ways the "industry" has convinced the government to mandate that the tool should be 100% safe for even a 5 year old is another matter entirely. I am actually surprised "axes" are even allowed to be sold to the general public....................oh my. LOL!

              Cheers,

              David

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              • #22
                Everyone has their preferences. I just replaced my 13 year old Delta Unisaw with a powermatic. So many people told me to get a saw stop. While accidents are never planned, most are preventable with knowledge and focus. I wanted the quality of the powermatic. So I pulled the trigger. I can’t imagine owning anything but a cabinet saw. Both powermatic and sawstop are good machines.

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                • #23
                  Paul,

                  My father had a late 90s Craftsman contractor saw for several years before I moved out and started building my own shop. His saw started developing some weird noises when spooling up and shutting down and it ended up being that the bore of the pulley was SLIGHTLY larger than the motor shaft. The set screw had started working its way loose and it was essentially rocking back and forth. I tightened it up and it ran like a dream and was quiet as could be after that. Have you tried taking the belt off and firing up just the motor to see if the sound is coming from the motor? The saw blade/arbor should spin VERY freely and the bearings should be whisper quiet. Spinning it by hand, you could use a screwdriver as a poor-man's stethoscope to inspect the arbor bearings. Because of starter winding switches, motors can be more difficult to perform this kind of test.

                  If it's not that simple... There really isn't much to the 1980s and newer Craftsman contractor saws. I had an 80s model for 10 years. When I first got it, I replaced the arbor and bearings, cleaned everything up and never really had another mechanical issue with it. I purchased a 90s model later, replaced the motor bearings, and that runs as smooth and quiet as can be. Essentially, the only mechanical spinning parts are the motor, arbor, associated bearings, and pulleys. If the trunion assembly is solid and consistent, you have everything aligned, and you have no interference with anything, there's really not much to go wrong with them.

                  All that said, I scored a really good deal on a 1940s Unisaw ($75). I replaced the arbor bearings and gave the whole thing a strip down, new paint job, and fresh lubrication on all the trunion parts and it runs like an absolute dream. I built my own Biesemeyer style fence so I can rip 50" wide and now I don't understand how I ever survived without a cabinet saw . If you can't find as good of a deal as I did and you don't want to drop the money on a cabinet saw, you can still get a lot of good use out of a well tuned contractor saw.

                  -Ben

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                  • #24
                    Thanks for the information, Ben. While I hadn't thought of the pulley being the problem, it had occurred to me to remove the belt as a way of isolating the problem to either before or after it. I'll give that a try. On the other hand, I really wouldn't mind having an excuse for upgrading.

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                    • #25
                      I've used several different "loaned" saws in my ~20 years doing this but this is my personal saw I've had for about 2.5 years. I have learned a lot about the differences but for me, a solid fence cannot be overlooked and a cast table top makes for a much smoother running saw. It's a 1.5 HP 10" Delta, non-belt driven and I got it through Lowes. This thing only set me back about 600 bucks and I feel like I got a lot for that price. It is mobile but I don't move it due to my shop setup. The fence is solid as a rock. Since building the outfeed table I will never not have one again. I am planning on an upgrade to either a Powermatic, Saw-Stop or Unisaw, I am undecided at this point, but this saw has been great for me so far and for someone looking for a mobile, safe, solid, inexpensive quiet saw I recommend it.

                      My father in law recently got a Saw-Stop contractor saw with a folding base. It is a nice saw and has some well engineered features, but for the $1400 it cost I am a little surprised at how "cheap" it feels by comparison. He loves it, and I am glad he has the added safety of the blade brake. If I were to get a Saw-Stop, it would be a cabinet saw.

                      Your results may vary.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Paul Ebert View Post
                        ... I really wouldn't mind having an excuse for upgrading.
                        That's a good enough reason for me... You have my permission.

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                        • #27
                          There is no function that a table saw can do that other tools are incapable of doing. I have a small basement shop that only has space for 1 big saw, and I chose a bandsaw instead (+ lots of hand tools), since it can both rip and resaw. Best decision ever. I find that table saws strongly color design decisions, especially among woodworking beginners. Sure the pros need em, but the hobbiest can definitely do without.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Waldo View Post
                            There is no function that a table saw can do that other tools are incapable of doing. I have a small basement shop that only has space for 1 big saw, and I chose a bandsaw instead (+ lots of hand tools), since it can both rip and resaw. Best decision ever. I find that table saws strongly color design decisions, especially among woodworking beginners. Sure the pros need em, but the hobbiest can definitely do without.
                            I think you are very correct for general woodworking, though I'm not sure for speaker building. I'm not sure how long a bandsaw blade would last cutting MDF and I'd never use a good hand tool on it.

                            Perhaps what I should be considering is a CNC instead of the tablesaw.

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                            • #29
                              Its actually fairly easy to and not terribly time consuming to sharpen a bandsaw blade, you just need a dremel. Might take a while if you've got a 15+ tpi blade, but a more typical 3-4 tpi blade goes quick.

                              But, using mdf if not a necessity. Esp if you have a good source for Baltic Birch ply.

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                              • #30
                                I use my band saw once or twice a year, table saw gets used on the regular. For speaker building specifically, table saw is the way to go. Smooth straight cuts and capable of handling sheet goods. But if you don't have room, you don't have room.

                                I just helped a friend put together his new saw stop cabinet saw. Pretty nice. Got his with the mobile base, moves around fine.
                                Copy of Lou C's speaker pages: http://www.rob-elder.com/LouC/speakers.html

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