Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What timber finishing technique do you use / prefer?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Real Honest-to-God urethane automotive lacquer laid down in a booth with a Positive Pressure Haz-Mat suit and external air supply will give an Oh-My-God perfectly clear super gloss finish (like Ferrari) for about $150-200 a coat. When it's mixed, it's use it or lose it, when you add the activator or catalyst, it has a "pot-life" then it's gone for painting. So are the "super-paints". Believe it or not, some of these are WATER BASED! They smell like rotten buttermilk from the fumes coming from the spray booth. We "amatuers" are stuck using "antique" paint technology, sadly. What used to take a super car paint artist a month to do for a show car can be duplicated in a day with modern finishes-and there are u-toob videos showing how-to!

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Whitneyville1 View Post
      Real Honest-to-God urethane automotive lacquer laid down in a booth with a Positive Pressure Haz-Mat suit and external air supply will give an Oh-My-God perfectly clear super gloss finish (like Ferrari) for about $150-200 a coat. When it's mixed, it's use it or lose it, when you add the activator or catalyst, it has a "pot-life" then it's gone for painting. So are the "super-paints". Believe it or not, some of these are WATER BASED! They smell like rotten buttermilk from the fumes coming from the spray booth. We "amatuers" are stuck using "antique" paint technology, sadly. What used to take a super car paint artist a month to do for a show car can be duplicated in a day with modern finishes-and there are u-toob videos showing how-to!
      automotive urethanes are the best without a doubt, but mainly from a durability standpoint. From a gloss standpoint, you can get pretty much the same finish from a number of consumer-grade products, you just need to put in the effort with the wetsanding and buffing. The speakers I posted earlier in this thread were done with Minwax spray-on Poly. I've painted guitars and cleared them with spray can clear from Wal Mart, and they'll polish up good enough to shave in the reflection. The real benefit to the automotive stuff is the rock solid durability that it provides. I've never tried the 2K catalyzed clear that you can buy in spray cans, but I intend to try it soon. Those who have used it have said that it's very good.

      Comment


      • JRT
        JRT commented
        Editing a comment
        Steinway uses polyester. Results in a beautiful hard finish suitable for wood substrate, but is some very nasty stuff while in air that somebody might breathe.

    • #18
      Would there be any issues with a 2pac finish over solid timber in terms of how hard it is and the timber expanding/contracting? Could it crack?

      I guess if it works on a metal car it must be somewhat pliable as metal expands and contracts as well....

      Comment


      • jim85iroc
        jim85iroc commented
        Editing a comment
        I'm not familiar with the 2K clear specifically, but in general, most catalyzed urethanes are flexible enough that I wouldn't expect that to be a problem. Lacquer can get very brittle with age and continues to shrink over time, so I'd expect that to be a bigger risk than a modern plasticized urethane.

    • #19
      For the most part, no, it’s not a problem to put 2k on timber as long as the timber has been stabilized and dried to an acceptable moisture level. Fresh cut timber is high in moisture content and will dry and shrink considerably, both of which will degrade the finish and can cause issues.

      Another trap many fall in to is leaving too much stain on. With very few exceptions, 95% of the color depth is achieved in 30 seconds or less of applying stain. Leaving it on longer isn’t necessarily bad as long as it gets wiped off, but whatever extra color depth is achieved by purposely leaving the stain on for, say, 10 mins, is actually just the solvents evaporating leaving the sediment on top of the wood instead of penetrating or resting in the grain as it is designed. This extra film is very detrimental to most any top coat, especially 2k. The solvents will reactivate the stain, and mix it in to the clear coat. This severely compromises the integrity of the clear finish and may even prevent it from curing.

      Comment


      • DeZZar
        DeZZar commented
        Editing a comment
        Good to know. I'm generally not a fan of stain and don't use it - hence not a lot of experience with it.

      • jim85iroc
        jim85iroc commented
        Editing a comment
        No problems clearing over dyes though!
    Working...
    X