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  • Making Inductor Coils


    I would like to make my own inductors coils with some surplus copper wire I have laying around. The raw copper wire I have is 12 gauge wire. I would like to make a couple of open air conductors rated at about 4mh. Can this be done?

    I also would like to know what effect replacing non polorized capcitors with some nicer poly metalized caps would do for my low end crossover point and my midrange crossover point. 500/3500

    Thanks,

    Phil

  • #2
    You want THIS calculator

    Provided Link: Air core coil calculator


    <A HREF="http://www.lalena.com/Audio/Calculator/Inductor/">http://www.lalena.com/Audio/Calculator/Inductor/</A>

    4mH/12ga are going to be some BIG coils, so start with large bobbins. You may want to consider getting (or making) a simple hand-crank winding machine with a turns counter.

    Upgrading to poly caps will do no harm, and maybe some good. Older NPEs may drift in value. If you use tighter tolerance caps (like 5% or 1%), you may get closer to the original design spec.

    > I would like to make my own inductors coils
    > with some surplus copper wire I have laying
    > around. The raw copper wire I have is 12
    > gauge wire. I would like to make a couple of
    > open air conductors rated at about 4mh. Can
    > this be done?

    > I also would like to know what effect
    > replacing non polorized capcitors with some
    > nicer poly metalized caps would do for my
    > low end crossover point and my midrange
    > crossover point. 500/3500

    > Thanks,

    > Phil

    Comment


    • #3
      this link shows how easy it is

      Provided Link: http://www.ratch-h.com/Inductors.html


      to wind your own inductors. As a practical mater, however, you will need a LC meter (inexpensive) or some other way to measure and "fine tune" your result.

      The link includes a spreadsheet for calculating number of turns and coil size.

      The 12 guage wire you have will only be useful if it is enameled. Bare wire won't work (it shorts) and the insulation on normally insulated power distribution wire spaces the turns too far apart.
      "It suggests that there is something that is happening in the real system that is not quite captured in the models."

      Comment


      • #4
        this link is to another calculator

        Provided Link: http://colomar.com/Shavano/inductor_info.html


        for determining number of turns and size
        "It suggests that there is something that is happening in the real system that is not quite captured in the models."

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: this link is to another calculator


          > for determining number of turns and size
          Thanks for the all the info! This very helpful. Phil

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: You want THIS calculator *NM*



            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Making Inductor Coils

              Provided Link: inductor winding on a lathe.


              Keith Kidder had an interesting way of doing it, that i think is worth mentioning. I'm going to try it myself when I get a lathe.
              You'll have to scroll down a bit for the pertinent info.

              HTH,
              Adrian

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Making Inductor Coils


                I might try this! Thanks, The article is also very interesting. Phil

                > Keith Kidder had an interesting way of doing
                > it, that i think is worth mentioning. I'm
                > going to try it myself when I get a lathe.
                > You'll have to scroll down a bit for the
                > pertinent info.

                > HTH,
                > Adrian

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Making Inductor Coils

                  Hey guys,
                  First post on here. I've been looking into this too, as I already have a bunch of air core bobbins laying around at work. You can check out http://www.cosmocorp.com/en/; this is where my company sources their bobbins from.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: this link shows how easy it is

                    Originally posted by Deward Hastings View Post
                    The 12 guage wire you have will only be useful if it is enameled. Bare wire won't work (it shorts) and the insulation on normally insulated power distribution wire spaces the turns too far apart.
                    You can still use insulated... it just makes the inductor bigger. (possibly a lot!) And with 12g, they're already pretty big. But if you have tons on hand, and size isn't an issue... give it a shot!

                    The other thing I'd mention, is it takes a fair amount of force to wind the bigger stuff.. whatever you use, try to have good motor speed control (ideally a footswitch/speed ctl that can stop in an instant), wear gloves, and don't get your fingers in there!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I did it.

                      Bought about 20 lbs of wire from a motor winder for cheap, it was the end of a real so he could not use it. I think it was 12ga. Built a simple winding jig with a crank and a removeable bobbin with brass screws and wood. Use brass so the measurements won't be off. Overall it was not hard. I brushed polyurethane over the coil as I wound do it would dry and not unspring when I released it. I would pull it off the bobbin and then use bell ties right away to secure the coil. I tried an electric method but it was harder than hand winding. I would wind about 50 turns and then scrap off a touch of wire and measure, then wind some more and measure, etc. 12ga is too big. If I did it again, which I won't because it was too much work, I would use 16 ga. That is big enough.

                      Pjay.
                      My speaker site: www.helarc.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: I did it.

                        Nice to see you pop-in, Peter!

                        What's brewin'?
                        Wolf
                        "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
                        "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
                        "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
                        "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

                        *InDIYana event website*

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                        My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
                        http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: I did it.

                          Originally posted by pjay View Post
                          ... 12ga is too big. If I did it again, which I won't because it was too much work, I would use 16 ga. That is big enough.

                          Pjay.
                          For hand winding, laying down two strands of 16 ga. in parallel is easier and is close to the DCR of 12 ga. (very close to 13 ga.).

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Making Inductor Coils

                            a 12 g 4mh coil is going to be huge! Be sure you have enough wire first. You can estimate the weight needed with those calculators. You will likely use more wire than they say because your windings wil not be perfect.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by 2leftthumbs View Post
                              a 12 g 4mh coil is going to be huge!
                              +1. I'd use a solid core to keep the size manageable.

                              Â*
                              www.billfitzmaurice.com
                              www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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