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  • Help with t nuts

    How do you install them, do the mount to the back side of the wood or pressed in from the front? Is there a better way?

    Thank you in advance

  • #2
    Re: Help with t nuts

    Think of T-nuts like regular nuts that you would use with a bolt, except they stay in wood by themselves.
    When used to mount a speaker in a baffle, for example, they would be mounted in the rear of the baffle with the "barbs" facing the front, so they dig into the wood.

    The idea is that once they are tightened up, and the barbs dig in, they will pretty much stay in the wood. They work okay as long as everything is lined up real good.
    It's not super-hard to knock one out though, so using the speaker mounting idea again, I would start all of the bolts to mount your particular driver first, then spin them down until snug, then tighten. That way if one does pop out, you don't have lots of un-screwing to do to get that T-nut re-seated.
    Hope this helps,
    TomZ
    *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
    *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

    *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

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    • #3
      Re: Help with t nuts

      they mount on the back side of the cut out. i drill the right size hole for them and mount them before i attach the baffle. once they are good and the driver fits i glue a ring on the back of the baffle that prevents the nuts from getting pushed out. I then remove the driver and mount the baffle to the box then I mount the driver.

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      • #4
        Re: Help with t nuts

        And in case you don't already know, don't try to pound them in ;)
        Start them in the backside by hand, push them in until the barbs grab a little, then thread a bolt with washer from the front and tighten. This pulls the t-nut in very nicely.

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        • #5
          Re: Help with t nuts

          And, if one strips (usually when!) re-tap it.

          Robert

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          • #6
            Re: Help with t nuts

            Thank you guy, I have used them before and they have been a P.I.T.A.

            (Pain in the A*&)

            I am thinking of drilling a recess in the front pull them in from the back and the fill the recess with epoxy

            Oh and by the way what size do you use for a 10 inch driver 1/4 20 seems kind of large?

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            • #7
              Re: Help with t nuts

              1/4- 20 is fine. I personally prefer Hurricane nuts. They don't "dig in" like a T-nut, and are very strong. For holding large drivers, either one is better than a simple, weaker wood screw.

              Regards,
              Eric

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              • #8
                Re: Help with t nuts

                I would drill the hole for a very snug fit to press them through from the back (inside the cabinet. The flat, washer part (where the spikes are, in the case of the T-nut) are facing out, from the inside of the cabinet, and adhere to the driver mounting area, INSIDE the enclosure.

                If you use Hurricane nuts, you can slightly "mortise" out the area inside to flush mount the washer part, if desired, but this is unneccessary, and might actually weaken the area around the woofer mount if your enclosures are not more than 3/4" thick.- Especially if you are flush mount routing the driver baffle, as this further decreases wood thickness around the driver mount area. :eek: I usually install these using either Liquid Nails construction adhesive, or even a strong super glue, (Best) being careful not to get any in the threads. Lubricate the threads with a light drop of WD40 or oil. ;)

                If these are a snug fit in the holes, as you draw down the screws, T-nuts will "dig in" to the wood, with the spikes holding them, requiring no adhesive.

                I personally prefer the use of a Hurricane nut, only gluing them in with a strong super glue. (I cannot stress this enough, and repeat: BE CAREFUL NOT TO GET ANY GLUE IN THE THREAD AREA OF THE NUT) Then press them in tight, then wait for them to fully dry before installing the driver. I use Permatex automotive RTV black gasket sealer around the rebate (flange) of the driver, for an airtight seal which is easy to separate if you need to remove the driver in the future. Then lubricate the threads of the screw, the nut, or both. Be careful not to overtighten.

                Either way, using T-Nuts or Hurricane nuts is a much stronger alternative to merely screwing in a driver, as the only strength, this way, would be the screw's weak holding power into MDF, particle board, or whatever wood you are using, which is only appropriate for small drivers and tweeters. Hope this helps in assisting you to better understand good driver mounting techniques. It is the only proper way to mount a large driver.

                Best Regards,
                Eric

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                • #9
                  Re: Help with t nuts

                  Go to Woodcraft.com. Look up threaded inserts. Drill a hole,use insert driver to screw insert in cabinet, then mount driver with a machine screw. works great and holds very firm,and looks good, especiallyf you use a good looking screw!

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                  • #10
                    Re: Help with t nuts

                    T nuts or "hurricane nuts" are a very affordable, and effective way to strengthen the bond between enclosure and driver. I've found the most effective way to install T nuts is as follows:

                    Drill the hole just a bit smaller than the shank of the nut as to provide a little bit of friction, when you are ready to install the nut, put a little construction adhesive or silicone around the underside of the hole, place the T nut in the hole from the backside of where you will be inserting the screw. (opposite side from the speaker). now, using an allen head bolt, which provides more even pressure, place a few larger washers onto the bolt, thread it through the mdf baffle and screw into the t-nut, aligning it if needed. now, slowly and steadily tighten the bolt until the t-nut is tight against the mdf and then remove. Allow the glue to dry before istalling your speaker to prevent push through of the nut. You don't need to apply extreme pressure to tighten the nut, just enough to get it flush with the surface of the MDF, when in doubt, back it out!

                    One tip should be explicitly followed: make sure your holes are lined up perfectly, especially on drivers that have small mounting holes or tight trim rings. A little extra time spent lining up the holes will save you much time re-building the front of your enclosure. Use and awl to punch a dimple in the center of your holes for the drill bit to follow....

                    Slow is smooth, smooth is fast!

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                    • #11
                      Re: Help with t nuts

                      I recently installed 8 hurricane nuts (10-32) was a perfect fit for my RS315 driver. Drilling the pilot hole for snug fit and pressing in with a large C clamp worked very well for me.

                      I find that T nuts often have difficulty penetrating the hard finished surface of MDF.

                      Marv

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                      • #12
                        Re: Help with t nuts

                        I have never had a problem with h-nuts and I do something that most probably do not - make sure the hole drilled is in the center of the driver thru hole. How I do this is take a nail with a sharp, centered point and wrap it with electrical tape until it just slips into the thru hole. Then use it to mark the centers for drilling holes that the h-nuts will snuggly fit. I can usually press the h-nuts in with my thumb. In my most recent design I created crossovers for two tweeters, one with 3 holes and one with four. I have removed/replaced the h-nuts a number of times now and they still fit snug and do not slip when tightened. T-nuts seem like an install once and leave alone type of thing since they chew up the board, but may be ok if you use plywood.

                        - Brad
                        Brad
                        piano black sealing mdf irregular recesses grill technique

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