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  • tone control frequencies

    approx. what range of frequencies are covered by your typical treble and bass controls?

    David
    ________
    Uggs
    Last edited by blue934; 04-11-2011, 05:25 AM.

  • #2
    Re: tone control frequencies

    Generally they go from little or no effect at ~1k to max effect at ~80-100Hz in the bass and ~10k in the treble. Max boost/cut is usually in the range of 6-15dB; however, it can vary a lot.

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    • #3
      Re: tone control frequencies

      I don't think there is a "typical." Check manufactures specs.

      The specifications for my YAMAHA receiver say:

      BASS Boost/cut (plus minus) 10 dB at 50Hz, Turnover Frequency 350 Hz
      TREBLE Boost/cut (plus minus) 10 dB at 20KHz, Turnover Frequency 3.5KHz

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      • #4
        Re: tone control frequencies

        Originally posted by View Post
        I don't think there is a "typical." Check manufactures specs.

        The specifications for my YAMAHA receiver say:

        BASS Boost/cut (plus minus) 10 dB at 50Hz, Turnover Frequency 350 Hz
        TREBLE Boost/cut (plus minus) 10 dB at 20KHz, Turnover Frequency 3.5KHz
        Yeah, I have that too. Please clarify for me the turnover frequency term they are using & how you handle using these controls if you are using them. I think for me, this is the downfall of my system. I have always been able to turn up the bass control and get more whomp to the music. Now if I turn it up, I get more bass, but is seems soft. More of a fill-in rather than direct.

        And why treble at 20khz?! Maybe I am just not getting the audiophile goal of sound yet.
        If dynamite was dangerous, do you think they'd sell it to an idiot like me?

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        • #5
          Re: tone control frequencies

          Originally posted by the kid View Post
          Yeah, I have that too. Please clarify for me the turnover frequency term they are using & how you handle using these controls if you are using them. I think for me, this is the downfall of my system. I have always been able to turn up the bass control and get more whomp to the music. Now if I turn it up, I get more bass, but is seems soft. More of a fill-in rather than direct.

          And why treble at 20khz?! Maybe I am just not getting the audiophile goal of sound yet.
          If his Treble/Bass control is anything like the one on my yamaha, it actually is a shelf not your normal "boost". The shelf is where everything between the "turnover" frequency to the respective limit is boosted. For example, his bass control will boost/lower all frequencies from 50 Hz to 350 Hz by up to 10 dB. Your normal bass boost is a peak centered at a frequency and rolls off on either end.

          *edit* Also, if you've made your speaker correctly you shouldn't need these controls unless you didn't put in the correct amount of BSC.
          ----------------------------------
          Gear:
          Samsung PN50A650
          Yamaha RX-V2500
          Hafler DH-200
          AC130MKII/BG NEO3PDR Two-Ways
          RS390HF-4 w/ HPSA500

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: tone control frequencies

            ...Unless you happen to prefer accentuated bass over ruler flat response.
            18hz is scary.

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            • #7
              Re: tone control frequencies

              Originally posted by JustinG View Post
              If his Treble/Bass control is anything like the one on my yamaha, it actually is a shelf not your normal "boost". The shelf is where everything between the "turnover" frequency to the respective limit is boosted. For example, his bass control will boost/lower all frequencies from 50 Hz to 350 Hz by up to 10 dB. Your normal bass boost is a peak centered at a frequency and rolls off on either end.

              *edit* Also, if you've made your speaker correctly you shouldn't need these controls unless you didn't put in the correct amount of BSC.
              The most "correct" speaker in the world must still interact with the environment in which it plays. My listening area is not large, but it's difficult. The 31-band EQ band settings used to flatten the response in this space don't resemble a "curve" at all. I keep a tamper-proof panel screwed into place in front of that piece of equipment. The tone controls on the pre-amp are normally in the center-detent position, but do prove useful once in awhile with badly recorded pieces of music--and there's a lot of that going around.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: tone control frequencies

                Shelf - that's more the term I was looking for!

                Sorry guys...I need my bass & treble!

                I understand "flat" seems to be the "it" for audiophile tastes. Also I understand & have incorporated this when comparing speakers to each other. BUT I simply cannot enjoy flat response listening! I am sure AC/DC is not intended to be a smooth even listening experience. Kick some bass and crank the 'fuzz boxes'. Nor Fleetwood Mac - in my experience I really enjoy hearing Stevie's voice stand out.

                I will try to build speakers utilizing the audiophile codes of honor, but quite frankly I will be making tonal adjustments afterwards that many may not care for. In the end, you need to please the listener. In my case...that's me!:D
                If dynamite was dangerous, do you think they'd sell it to an idiot like me?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: tone control frequencies

                  Originally posted by johnddaugherty View Post
                  The most "correct" speaker in the world must still interact with the environment in which it plays. My listening area is not large, but it's difficult. The 31-band EQ band settings used to flatten the response in this space don't resemble a "curve" at all. I keep a tamper-proof panel screwed into place in front of that piece of equipment. The tone controls on the pre-amp are normally in the center-detent position, but do prove useful once in awhile with badly recorded pieces of music--and there's a lot of that going around.
                  You are correct about needing to interact with the environment. I wasn't suggesting that a correctly designed speaker didn't need an EQ to correct other problems caused by the room. I ignored that part since these issues can't be handled by tone controls unless the onlything your room is doing is sucking the treble out at a cetain frequency that just so happens to be aligned with the treble adjustment on your amp. Which I feel safe in assuming it isn't.

                  As for myself I have my Yamaha's mic and adjustment software (YPAO?) handle the in room problems since I don't have an outboard EQ.
                  ----------------------------------
                  Gear:
                  Samsung PN50A650
                  Yamaha RX-V2500
                  Hafler DH-200
                  AC130MKII/BG NEO3PDR Two-Ways
                  RS390HF-4 w/ HPSA500

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: tone control frequencies

                    "As for myself I have my Yamaha's mic and adjustment software (YPAO?) handle the in room problems since I don't have an outboard EQ."

                    Interestingly, the LACK of YPAO was my dissapointed reason for trying a second diy project! In other words, my brain shut down & I didn't even consider using that feature on my first pair of speakers. Could never get a good sound from them. So, I figured the answer was a different speaker. After connecting up my second project, being dissappointed again, it finally dawned on me to use the YPAO!!! Did make a significant improvement. But alas, I still ended up with an outboard eq. And the bass and treble controls.

                    I am sure room placement could affect my sound, but they are where they have to be & I have to fix it the best I know how (very little:o).
                    If dynamite was dangerous, do you think they'd sell it to an idiot like me?

                    Comment

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