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  • OT: DIY Ping-Pong Table?

    Hey everyone,

    I'm looking to make a full-size ping-pong table... I was thinking of using 2-3 sheets of finished plywood, glued together..

    Has anyone done this before?

    NK
    I'm just that guy. www.sru.edu Rock Solid.

    "It has been remarked that if one selects his own components, builds his own enclosure, and is convinced he has made a wise choice of design, then his own loudspeaker sounds better to him than does anyone else's loudspeaker. In this case, the frequency response of the loudspeaker seems to play only a minor part in forming a person's opinion."

    L.L. Beranek, Acoustics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1954), p.208.

  • #2
    Re: OT: DIY Ping-Pong Table?

    Nick,

    Isn't there a law or something about the habitants of this site making anything out of a substance other than MDF?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: OT: DIY Ping-Pong Table?

      If you are going to make one make it strong enough to use a party table.

      9 foot by 5

      http://www.essortment.com/hobbies/ta...ishow_sgyi.htm

      http://tabletennis.about.com/od/tabl...uild_table.htm

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: OT: DIY Ping-Pong Table?

        Originally posted by nick29498141 View Post
        Hey everyone,

        I'm looking to make a full-size ping-pong table... I was thinking of using 2-3 sheets of finished plywood, glued together..

        Has anyone done this before?

        NK
        Neil Davis was recently working on a DIY ping pong table...

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: OT: DIY Ping-Pong Table?

          Originally posted by martyh View Post
          Nick,

          Isn't there a law or something about the habitants of this site making anything out of a substance other than MDF?
          Haha, yeah.. I betta' start running!

          NK
          I'm just that guy. www.sru.edu Rock Solid.

          "It has been remarked that if one selects his own components, builds his own enclosure, and is convinced he has made a wise choice of design, then his own loudspeaker sounds better to him than does anyone else's loudspeaker. In this case, the frequency response of the loudspeaker seems to play only a minor part in forming a person's opinion."

          L.L. Beranek, Acoustics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1954), p.208.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: OT: DIY Ping-Pong Table?

            So here's my basic idea (right now):

            I'll sandwich two sheets of 9x5' (If I can get it) MDF, and sand the living hell out of it. Paint with table tennis paint, attach a net to the sides (clamp?)..

            Legs: ?

            I'd like them to fold, as it's for my dorm's common area, and I'm thinking of recycling the folding (Al or Steel) legs from a long folding table.. Good idea?

            NK
            I'm just that guy. www.sru.edu Rock Solid.

            "It has been remarked that if one selects his own components, builds his own enclosure, and is convinced he has made a wise choice of design, then his own loudspeaker sounds better to him than does anyone else's loudspeaker. In this case, the frequency response of the loudspeaker seems to play only a minor part in forming a person's opinion."

            L.L. Beranek, Acoustics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1954), p.208.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: OT: DIY Ping-Pong Table?

              Originally posted by nick29498141 View Post
              So here's my basic idea (right now):

              I'll sandwich two sheets of 9x5' (If I can get it) MDF, and sand the living hell out of it. Paint with table tennis paint, attach a net to the sides (clamp?)..

              Legs: ?

              I'd like them to fold, as it's for my dorm's common area, and I'm thinking of recycling the folding (Al or Steel) legs from a long folding table.. Good idea?

              NK
              That's a lot of weight, and the MDF in that size is probably going to be expensive. I think 3/4" MDF is about 3lbs/sq-ft, and a regulation table is 45 sq-ft. And you want double thickness??

              I made a maple frame from 2" strips and fastened 3/16" hardboard to the frame. Then I glued sheets of 1-1/2" urethane foam insulation to the hardboard inside the frame. The foam provided the stiffness without much weight, and the hardboard made a nice surface. The picture isn't very good, but it shows one of the two halves (upside-down). I cheated and made the top from 4' by 5' sheets plus a 6" strip in the middle. Works OK--the joint is close to the net and doesn't interfere with normal play.

              Click image for larger version

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              I used some cool spring-load hinges so I can quickly separate the two pieces. I just use a cheap folding table as the base, and put on the top when we want to use it. I put an extra layer of 1/8" hardboard on the bottom to protect the foam, but it adds to the weight and it's probably not necessary. Even so, I can lift each table half without too much effort.

              I'll try to take pictures of the completed table tomorrow, but my wife is visiting grandkids and she might have taken the camera.

              Good luck finding ping pong table paint. The latex stuff at Home Depot doesn't work, and the spray stuff will require about 6-8 cans for a good finish (I gave up after 4 cans). The best stuff is the WM Kemp paint, but it's about $25 online for a quart, with $25 shipping. I was lucky to find a local hardware store that had some for $7. See this thread for the problems I had with the finish:
              http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...ight=ping+pong

              We've got a nice Kettler aluminum table at our cabin in Western MD, and it's got "more bounce" than this DIY table. But this table is pretty good for what it cost, and it's quite useable.
              Free Passive Speaker Designer Lite (PSD-Lite) -- http://www.audiodevelopers.com/Softw...Lite/setup.exe

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: OT: DIY Ping-Pong Table?

                Originally posted by neildavis View Post
                That's a lot of weight, and the MDF in that size is probably going to be expensive. I think 3/4" MDF is about 3lbs/sq-ft, and a regulation table is 45 sq-ft. And you want double thickness??

                I made a maple frame from 2" strips and fastened 3/16" hardboard to the frame. Then I glued sheets of 1-1/2" urethane foam insulation to the hardboard inside the frame. The foam provided the stiffness without much weight, and the hardboard made a nice surface. The picture isn't very good, but it shows one of the two halves (upside-down). I cheated and made the top from 4' by 5' sheets plus a 6" strip in the middle. Works OK--the joint is close to the net and doesn't interfere with normal play.

                [ATTACH]5122[/ATTACH]

                I used some cool spring-load hinges so I can quickly separate the two pieces. I just use a cheap folding table as the base, and put on the top when we want to use it. I put an extra layer of 1/8" hardboard on the bottom to protect the foam, but it adds to the weight and it's probably not necessary. Even so, I can lift each table half without too much effort.

                I'll try to take pictures of the completed table tomorrow, but my wife is visiting grandkids and she might have taken the camera.

                Good luck finding ping pong table paint. The latex stuff at Home Depot doesn't work, and the spray stuff will require about 6-8 cans for a good finish (I gave up after 4 cans). The best stuff is the WM Kemp paint, but it's about $25 online for a quart, with $25 shipping. I was lucky to find a local hardware store that had some for $7. See this thread for the problems I had with the finish:
                http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...ight=ping+pong

                We've got a nice Kettler aluminum table at our cabin in Western MD, and it's got "more bounce" than this DIY table. But this table is pretty good for what it cost, and it's quite useable.
                Thanks for the detailed response.

                It was brought up in a House Council meeting, that some CA wanted $400 to be allotted for a new (commercial) ping-pong table.. I just think that's a ridiculous use of money that the 400 students in my building chipped it.

                1. Could I use a couple (or three) sheets of finished plywood? (weight is a bit of a concern)

                2. Could I use "chalkboard" paint?

                Thanks

                NK
                I'm just that guy. www.sru.edu Rock Solid.

                "It has been remarked that if one selects his own components, builds his own enclosure, and is convinced he has made a wise choice of design, then his own loudspeaker sounds better to him than does anyone else's loudspeaker. In this case, the frequency response of the loudspeaker seems to play only a minor part in forming a person's opinion."

                L.L. Beranek, Acoustics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1954), p.208.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: OT: DIY Ping-Pong Table?

                  Originally posted by nick29498141 View Post
                  1. Could I use a couple (or three) sheets of finished plywood? (weight is a bit of a concern)
                  With a good finish, plywood should work fine. If you are concerned about weight, then you may want to consider the "cored" approach with thin rigid skins and a foam core. That's how steel doors are made, and that's the approach I took with the hardboard. But there are a lot of ways to implement that approach, with different rib structures and materials. You might want to consider getting a mechanical engineering student to help with the design.

                  2. Could I use "chalkboard" paint?
                  As far as I know, chalkboard paint is just very "flat" paint, and chalkboard paint is sometimes marketed as ping pong table paint. Paint is made "flat" by adding silicates, which is a broad grouping of materials including talc and quartz. That ground-up rock material makes a good hard surface for either chalk or ping pong [expletive deleted]. However, my experience is that the latex-based chalkboard paint isn't suitable for a ping pong table. And I believe that quartz powder is going to be a lot better than talc for ping pong. So if by "chalkboard" paint you mean that latex-based Rustoleum product at Home Depot, the answer is "no"--it won't work. If you can find an oil-based chalkboard paint that uses quartz as the flattening agent, then yes, it will work.

                  It was brought up in a House Council meeting, that some CA wanted $400 to be allotted for a new (commercial) ping-pong table
                  That's a reasonable price to pay for something that will be a long-term investment. You might be able to get by with less than $200 for a DIY table, but it won't have wheels and be foldable and it probably won't be as rugged--that stuff costs money. My approach is a bit crude--it works fine for our basement area, but I'm not sure I'd be comfortable doing the same thing for a dorm.
                  Free Passive Speaker Designer Lite (PSD-Lite) -- http://www.audiodevelopers.com/Softw...Lite/setup.exe

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: OT: DIY Ping-Pong Table?

                    Originally posted by neildavis View Post
                    With a good finish, plywood should work fine. If you are concerned about weight, then you may want to consider the "cored" approach with thin rigid skins and a foam core. That's how steel doors are made, and that's the approach I took with the hardboard. But there are a lot of ways to implement that approach, with different rib structures and materials. You might want to consider getting a mechanical engineering student to help with the design.


                    As far as I know, chalkboard paint is just very "flat" paint, and chalkboard paint is sometimes marketed as ping pong table paint. Paint is made "flat" by adding silicates, which is a broad grouping of materials including talc and quartz. That ground-up rock material makes a good hard surface for either chalk or ping pong [expletive deleted]. However, my experience is that the latex-based chalkboard paint isn't suitable for a ping pong table. And I believe that quartz powder is going to be a lot better than talc for ping pong. So if by "chalkboard" paint you mean that latex-based Rustoleum product at Home Depot, the answer is "no"--it won't work. If you can find an oil-based chalkboard paint that uses quartz as the flattening agent, then yes, it will work.


                    That's a reasonable price to pay for something that will be a long-term investment. You might be able to get by with less than $200 for a DIY table, but it won't have wheels and be foldable and it probably won't be as rugged--that stuff costs money. My approach is a bit crude--it works fine for our basement area, but I'm not sure I'd be comfortable doing the same thing for a dorm.

                    Thanks, Neil!

                    I think now I'm looking for a decent one on the used market, or considering just buying a used "top" and retrofitting it to sit in/ slightly above the pool table in the rec room.

                    NK
                    I'm just that guy. www.sru.edu Rock Solid.

                    "It has been remarked that if one selects his own components, builds his own enclosure, and is convinced he has made a wise choice of design, then his own loudspeaker sounds better to him than does anyone else's loudspeaker. In this case, the frequency response of the loudspeaker seems to play only a minor part in forming a person's opinion."

                    L.L. Beranek, Acoustics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1954), p.208.

                    Comment

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