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Baffles ain't flat!

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  • Baffles ain't flat!

    So, on my new project I want to add an oak baffle to the cabinet. When purchasing, I took a while sorting through HD's stock of oak. I tried to get one flat and with a matching repeating grain design so when I cut it down it would look like 2 of a kind.

    Now that I am about ready to make the cutouts and mount the baffle, I notice there is no way it will lay flat without running screws through the front & into the cabinets. This now gives me holes in what I had originally intended to avoid.

    With the belief that I am not the only one who ever came home without a non-perfect flat piece of material, how do you fix this? Will Titebond II have the strength to hold down a slight warp? I was hoping to lay on the glue and clamp it down for a nicer look like a lot of your projects which have no screw holes. The baffles probably raise about 1/8" either on the end or in the middle depending on if you flip it around.
    If dynamite was dangerous, do you think they'd sell it to an idiot like me?

  • #2
    Re: Baffles ain't flat!

    I think you just realized why we use MDF and veneer instead of hardwood panels ;)

    If you want to use hardwood, buy a panel that's too thick, let it sit in the garage for a couple years, then plane it down to the thickness you want.
    Last edited by DoubleTap; 02-11-2010, 07:23 PM.
    Vapor Audio

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    • #3
      Re: Baffles ain't flat!

      You have 3 choices:
      - try to glue it down as is (could be a bad idea)
      - sand it flat
      - run it thorough a planer, so at least one side's flat. A local woodworker's lumber yard will help, if you can find one. I'm blessed.

      I had slight warpage in my ash wood baffles, but my design made it easy to flatten the backs to the box, and I used epoxy with a cork damping layer beneath. I still have a little cupping on the front that became obvious when I routed the offset tweeter recess.

      Is the oak even thick enough to plane? Lots of clamps and strong glue might be enough....

      Have fun,
      Frank

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      • #4
        Re: Baffles ain't flat!

        You could try this pie in the sky idea:

        Glue the hardwood down to the cabinet using wood glue applied to the concave side. You will need lots of clamping to get contact. When the wood starts to soak up the glue, that side will slightly expand, helping to flatten out the wood against the speaker cabinet.

        If it doesn't work, you have ruined everything so be careful!

        -Charlie
        Charlie's Audio Pages: http://audio.claub.net

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        • #5
          Re: Baffles ain't flat!

          what is the baffles dimensions. I have a planer up to 10 inch wide if the baffle is not to wide I could plane it down flat. if it fits in the flat rate below shipping is not bad.

          https://shop.usps.com/webapp/wcs/sto...WT.ac=10000275

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          • #6
            Re: Baffles ain't flat!

            You need one of these...

            ~99%
            Make me an angel that flies from Montgomery
            Make me a poster of an old rodeo
            Just give me one thing that I can hold on to
            To believe in this livin' is just a hard way to go

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            • #7
              Re: Baffles ain't flat!

              I have taken two pieces of wood like this () both bent .

              glue the center and clamp for a week.

              use a piece of angle iron to help square it works if the bend is not to big.

              if bend is big you crack one or both boards. I have done the same with bigger bends and no glue. don't close the gap just tighten clamps a bit. Then spray it with a bit of water. Keep it moist come back in a few days tighten the clamps do it over a month the bend will leave.

              then keep it clamped with angle irons so it is straight. then sand and seal. oak is much harder then maple tends to crack and it is not worth the work.

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              • #8
                Re: Baffles ain't flat!

                Thanks guys.

                The baffles are 46.5 x 8 x .75. I think it is a little closer to 1/16" warp.

                I was considering glueing and clamping anyway, but it scares me to mess it up at this point. I may just punt & make grills. Then I can use the same holes for the screws & guides. I really was trying to avoid the grill as it will be my first attempt -ooooohhh.

                But, if the little one starts crawling around it may be a benefit to have them.
                If dynamite was dangerous, do you think they'd sell it to an idiot like me?

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                • #9
                  Re: Baffles ain't flat!

                  Maybe do what Infinity did with their oak panels:

                  Reference Standard II

                  Not just for looks but to control diffraction.

                  Or this way:

                  Reference Standard III A/B

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                  • #10
                    Re: Baffles ain't flat!

                    How about first laying down a MDF baffle or braces across the front of the enclosure and then run screws from the inside of the cabinet through the MDF baffle into the oak as well as using glue?

                    Louis
                    Last edited by Ludo; 02-11-2010, 06:56 PM. Reason: typo

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                    • #11
                      Re: Baffles ain't flat!

                      Hardwood is almost never flat, it naturally cups as it dries. If you're going to work with hardwood you need to have a planer to plane it flat just prior to the build.
                      www.billfitzmaurice.com
                      www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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                      • #12
                        Re: Baffles ain't flat!

                        Do you guys think it would be possible for him to steam these for a couple hours over the stove, and then clamp flat for a couple days / weeks? Maybe a couple critter pots full of water and what not? Would stay flat maybe for assembly, then after he glues the crap out of it in assembly it'll hold.. maybe?
                        ~Mark

                        Stuff I've builded http://techtalk.parts-express.com/co...lies/smile.png

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                        • #13
                          Re: Baffles ain't flat!

                          This is a trivial fix if you can find someone like Phil with a power planer. that's why I suggested it. Any lumber yard that converts rough-sawn wood to dimensional lumber can plane it for you. With 0.75", you've got plenty of wood to work with, especially since it's doubled up on MDF.
                          Frank

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                          • #14
                            Re: Baffles ain't flat!

                            planing it flat is best choice.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Baffles ain't flat!

                              Are you saying that it's cupped over the 8" dimension, or the 46.5" dimension?

                              First you need to let it acclimate to your room environment. Things could get better - or worse.

                              If nothing changes, 1/16" over an 8" span isn't much. I'd just glue and clamp it down tight.
                              Last edited by KLR; 02-11-2010, 07:36 PM. Reason: Typo

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