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DOTD HDTV Antenna...Speaking Of..

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  • DOTD HDTV Antenna...Speaking Of..

    the DOTD antenna reminded me of the "MClapp" high-gain antenna plan I built. With this design, I picked up both Mobile and New Orleans which are about 60 miles away. I'm smack in the middle between them.

    The total cost of materials was less than $20. Anyone else try the "MClapp cat whisker" design?

  • #2
    Re: DOTD HDTV Antenna...Speaking Of..

    I've made a coat hanger antenna: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWQhlmJTMzw It works pretty well, but I don't have anything to compare it to except some old rabbit ears (it works much better than the rabbit ears). It cost me nothing to build, as all of the materials were cluttering up my house. I'm receiving more stations than I thought I would, seeing as my house is on the wrong side of some large hills.

    What is the MClapp design? I wasn't able to find a good description of it on the web. I might want to take a shot at building one if it'll improve my reception.
    Statements: "They usually kill the desire to build anything else."

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: DOTD HDTV Antenna...Speaking Of..

      It's an enhanced design as the video link you provided. He tweaked the whisker lengths and couple other improvements for better performance.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: DOTD HDTV Antenna...Speaking Of..

        That DOTD is half the price of Best Buy's. I don't know if it's a good antenna, though.

        I'm thinking of making a Gray-Hoverman to see if that'll beat the coat hanger antenna. With a reflector, it probably will (at the expense of being more directional).
        Statements: "They usually kill the desire to build anything else."

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: DOTD HDTV Antenna...Speaking Of..

          Originally posted by Randy L View Post
          the DOTD antenna reminded me of the "MClapp" high-gain antenna plan I built. With this design, I picked up both Mobile and New Orleans which are about 60 miles away. I'm smack in the middle between them.

          The total cost of materials was less than $20. Anyone else try the "MClapp cat whisker" design?
          Not yet, but I've built the regular MClapp one (M4), and it's great :D

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: DOTD HDTV Antenna...Speaking Of..

            here is a long thread. deep into it one poster claims good reception in fla read flat land. at a 40 mile distance


            http://www.dtvusaforum.com/dtv-hdtv-...1-how-vhf.html

            my guess is if you are under 30 miles and don't have a hill in the way it will work

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: DOTD HDTV Antenna...Speaking Of..

              http://www.parts-express.com/pe/show...#windowcontent

              That DOTD antenna sure looks a lot like Denny's EZ HD antenna, but for less money and it includes the mount!



              http://www.dennysantennaservice.com/...v_Antenna.html

              Marvin

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              • #8
                Re: DOTD HDTV Antenna...Speaking Of..

                I have one of these:
                http://www.parts-express.com/pe/show...number=210-330
                Works well for local channels when bunny ears didn't. I live in a metal sided house <5 miles from all the towers in my area. It used to bring in some channels from ~30 miles away, but not for the past few months. I wonder if it might be due to the leaves on the trees? ;)

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                • #9
                  Re: DOTD HDTV Antenna...Speaking Of..

                  On my extensive reading on HDTV antennas I found out the the HDTV frequencies are easily blocked by leaves. Actually it's anything with water in it...leaves, trees, wood. Also, the way the signals bounce and "move around" objects, moving the antenna as little as one foot can make all the difference in the world.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: DOTD HDTV Antenna...Speaking Of..

                    I keep having problems with tree leaves, especially when wet. Wind can make it even worse.

                    My back yard tree keeps growing in front of my antenna. I'm running out of places to mount it

                    Everything works fine in the winter when the leaves are gone

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                    • #11
                      Re: DOTD HDTV Antenna...Speaking Of..

                      How about this for $39.99
                      http://www.heartlandamerica.com/brow...91643&&DL=HWH2
                      Attached Files

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                      • #12
                        Re: DOTD HDTV Antenna...Speaking Of..

                        umm, how about what?:D

                        Mark

                        Edit: you posted the link and pic while I was posting...my bad...:O
                        You go your way, I'll go mine. I don't care if we get there on time.

                        ~Pink Floyd

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                        • #13
                          Re: DOTD HDTV Antenna...Speaking Of..

                          Originally posted by Mark65 View Post
                          umm, how about what?:D

                          Mark

                          Edit: you posted the link and pic while I was posting...my bad...:O
                          No problem my friend.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: DOTD HDTV Antenna...Speaking Of..

                            Check the frequency of the stations you are trying to pick up before buying an HDTV antenna. Yesterday's and today's DOTD are for OK for UHF, which is where most of the DTV stations moved to after the transition to digital. However, a number of the stations are still on VHF, and these small antennas don't work well for VHF. I put up a very large UHF antenna in the attic, but it turned out to be useless for 2 of the 4 major stations that we have in the DC area. If the new frequency is channel 9 or less, these antennas probably won't work well.

                            Here is the list:
                            http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_publi...C-07-138A2.xls
                            Free Passive Speaker Designer Lite (PSD-Lite) -- http://www.audiodevelopers.com/Softw...Lite/setup.exe

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: DOTD HDTV Antenna...Speaking Of..

                              If you're interested in making a TV antenna, go here:
                              http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=798265
                              That YouTube video is the first post, and while a 4-bay bowtie is a good design, this not the version you want to build.

                              If you're interested in the Gray-Hoverman, go here.
                              http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=81

                              I got involved with these folks some years back (same alias) but couldn't quite keep up when they started into the National Electro-magnetic Code (NEC) antenna modeling. My capability was limited to the understanding that scaling was "legal" which made cloning a proven, commercial design at a different frequency nothing more than arithmetic.

                              One of the most technically savy posters in the AVS thread is holl_ands. I just built his FM antenna.

                              Note that there is no such thing as an "HD" or HDTV" antenna. The EM wave didn't change, just how we encode data on it. However, digital tuners do not react to poor signal gracefully, so in many antenna applications, "HD" is synonymous with "BIG."

                              Older UHF antennas covered a far wider frequency range because UHF channels went to into the 80's. The digital transition included truncation of the UHF TV spectrum at ch 51, allowing the FCC to sell the "700MHz" band for enhanced services. Since scaling is nothing more than multiplying by a constant, one can take the ratio of ch 80 to ch 52 (869MHz / 701MHz ~= 1.25) to find the scaling factor. I made mine 1/8 scale, purely by accident...

                              That only addresses UHF channels. VHF TV is split into VHF-low (Ch 2-6) and VHF-high (Ch 7-13). Many stations reverted to their VHF-high frequency, or moved to a vacated one because VHF has far better propagation, so it's easier to receive far away. Thankfully, few stations are on VHF-low, and that's good because at frequencies 1/10 UHF, the scaling rule means antennas are 10x larger (or use a different design).

                              Thankfully, multi-bay bowties can be made to work over a very wide frequency range. What did I do?
                              - 4-bay bowtie, like the one on YouTube (but lots prettier)
                              - 1 1/8 scale relative to CM4221 (see AVS posts starting at bottom page 1)
                              - double-width reflector to improve VHF-high reception (I need 10 & 13)
                              - upgraded to lower gauge (thicker) element relative to AVS pics.

                              The worst part was the weather; I put both the final TV and the new FM antennae up during the July 4th heat wave... and yes, we have cable. I blame this all on Fox's NFL coverage (Fox wouldn't give an HD feed to Time Warner Cable in 2006, so I watch football OTA that first year).

                              Have fun,
                              Frank

                              PS There's a reason for the NEC; modeling is the only way to get repeatable gain values, and it's really hard to predict performance of things like the DOTD design (or other $39 specials) without it.

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