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Repair My Powered Subwoofer

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  • #16
    Re: Repair My Powered Subwoofer

    Still though, if he wants to repair it to original specs, he still might have to do what I suggested. Does the switch still function properly? Or of course mount an altogether separate switch.
    What like I suggested in the post directly above yours? ;)

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    • #17
      Re: Repair My Powered Subwoofer

      Originally posted by evilskillit View Post
      What like I suggested in the post directly above yours? ;)
      Yes. :D

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      • #18
        Re: Repair My Powered Subwoofer

        Originally posted by nelsonvandal View Post
        It looks like a standard ALPS RK097 would fit.

        http://tangentsoft.net/shop/ or http://www.amb.org/shop/ or several of the larger vendors.

        I can't imagine that there should be any problems with a 10k pot instead of the 50k pot.

        Are you sure it's the pot that's faulty and not the cord that's broken, or any other fault. If the problem is that it wont power on, you can try to short the two pins furthermost to the left (of those marked with circles on the pictures above). It's the same as turning it on with the pot/switch.
        Yes it is definitely the POT that is the problem and not the cord (had it tested). I thought about shorting the two pins as well, but the issue becomes trying to control the volume. Doing it that way you suggest makes the subwoofer go to its maximum volume which is very loud and then trying to control it by using the media player's volume control. The subwoofer is so loud that even the slightest movement of the slide control on any media player makes the sound too loud...especially late at night when everyone is sleeping. The POTS you suggested are not the DUAL SHAFT POTS I require and I wonder what issues may arise if i use one of these? The POT I have is dual shaft and one knob turns the unit on and allows volume adjustment and the other knob control the left/right speaker balance.

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        • #19
          Re: Repair My Powered Subwoofer

          Originally posted by evilskillit View Post
          There is another option, the center thing is just the on off switch or something right? Thats what I'm getting from looking at the solder pads since it looks like a standard stereo pot and then a switch sharing the same housing.

          You could just use a standard stereo potentiometer and then solder wires into the last 2 solder pads and put a switch between the two, or just short them so the thing is always on.

          If you use a switch land wires on those pads, cut a small hole in the housing and poke the switch out the side, attach it there and land the wires.

          Seeing if this will work will require a small amount of trial and error but it is a possible alternative.
          I thought about doing a similar thing as well, I just thought i might try and get a replacement POT first and try this as A LAST RESORT if a replacement POT can not be found or had.

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          • #20
            Re: Repair My Powered Subwoofer

            If it comes down to it, its easy enough to find a dual gang 50k pot that will fit on Mouser without too much trouble. The brand doesn't matter so much as the resistance, taper and dimensions.

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            • #21
              Re: Repair My Powered Subwoofer

              I was looking on "the bay" and from what I'm seeing, the "B" in B50K is denoting a linear taper pot. That makes sense for the balance section but not so much for the volume section, but I suppose it's possible. Most of the time an audio volume pot is the "A" type audio, aka log (logarithmic) taper.

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              • #22
                Re: Repair My Powered Subwoofer

                I think the pot on my Klipsch PC speakers was a linear trim, also it never used more than 15% of the volume knob because it went from silent to blaring so quickly. I had to turn my PC's volume way down to be able to use more than a fraction of the volume. When I replaced my broken potentiometer I went for an audio trim instead and it still works just fine but the volume knob is much more useful. Your mileage may vary.

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                • #23
                  Re: Repair My Powered Subwoofer

                  Originally posted by evilskillit View Post
                  There is another option, the center thing is just the on off switch or something right? Thats what I'm getting from looking at the solder pads since it looks like a standard stereo pot and then a switch sharing the same housing.

                  You could just use a standard stereo potentiometer and then solder wires into the last 2 solder pads and put a switch between the two, or just short them so the thing is always on.

                  If you use a switch land wires on those pads, cut a small hole in the housing and poke the switch out the side, attach it there and land the wires.

                  Seeing if this will work will require a small amount of trial and error but it is a possible alternative.
                  Hey EVILSKILLIT

                  After having ZERO luck at getting a hold of a potentiometer from any company unless I was willing to buy a minimum of 500 to 1500 just for the sake of getting one...I used your advice and essentially shorted the last two soldered pins which essentially turns the system on and keeps it on. It takes quite a bit of manipulation of the computers volume control and a finer control of the volume using the media players volume control to make the sound work well, but it does work. So thanks for that tip.

                  For anyone else having the same issue the two pins in this photo
                  on the far left side with the red circles around them. I took a thin wire and soldered it to the two pins and that allowed the subwoofer to power up and produce sound. If you do this make sure to turn your computers volume control all the way down first as the speaker will BLAST at its fullest volume as soon as any audio signal comes through. Once you have completed the soldering increase the computers volume control up to only about 3 to 5 percent and then use the media player volume control to get it to where you want it.

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                  • #24
                    Re: Repair My Powered Subwoofer

                    Originally posted by HERCULES2X View Post
                    Hey EVILSKILLIT

                    After having ZERO luck at getting a hold of a potentiometer from any company unless I was willing to buy a minimum of 500 to 1500 just for the sake of getting one...I used your advice and essentially shorted the last two soldered pins which essentially turns the system on and keeps it on. It takes quite a bit of manipulation of the computers volume control and a finer control of the volume using the media players volume control to make the sound work well, but it does work. So thanks for that tip.

                    For anyone else having the same issue the two pins in this photo on the far left side with the red circles around them. I took a thin wire and soldered it to the two pins and that allowed the subwoofer to power up and produce sound. If you do this make sure to turn your computers volume control all the way down first as the speaker will BLAST at its fullest volume as soon as any audio signal comes through. Once you have completed the soldering increase the computers volume control up to only about 3 to 5 percent and then use the media player volume control to get it to where you want it.
                    Cool, glad we could be of service. As I pointed out now that you have shorted that you could probably take the volume pot off and replace it with any ol 50k pot that fits. Thats your best option if you want finer volume control back. But for now at least you have working speakers at basically 0 extra cost. And this my friends, is what DIY is all about.

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                    • #25
                      btw a trick I've used in the past was ordering samples . Anyone try? I'm in this same scenario and don't want the resistor fix. I just soaked it in pure alcohol while messing with it and perhaps is a little better now. I've noticed that if I have both analog inputs plugged into the back, and only one plugged into my laptop and swipe the F/R fader from front to back the volume changes drastically, anyone have similar experience?

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                      • djg
                        djg commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Preach it bro.

                    • #26
                      sorry I meant swiping from middle position of fader to enabled side

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                      • #27
                        I think this may be affected by which plug in the back you use. Btw I've got the random volume change issue w/o changing volume from knob. I think a capacitor in the main board may be going bad, will have to go through them all and replace. Anyone see this issue?

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                        • #28
                          fixed the volume issue! Wrote up about it here: http://hesiod.blogspot.com/2020/06/f...cambridge.html

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