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  • Woodworking Question

    I have access to damaged hardwood rejects from a distributor that my son-in -law works for. Most usable pieces are more than enough to do speaker building. I want to try a mitered edge enclosure, but have never set up a cut on my table saw. What can you experienced woodworkers give me as tips to do this the proper and accurate way.

    Thanks,
    Audiophiles listen to the equipment, not the music.

  • #2
    Re: Woodworking Question

    Buy a precision bevel/miter angle gauge. I have this one.
    http://www.japanwoodworker.com/produ...&dept_id=12994


    Available from several vendors.
    I was so much older then, I'm younger than that now.
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    Swope TM http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...d.php?t=221818
    Econowave and Audio Nirvana AN10 fullrange http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...d.php?t=216841
    Imperial Russian Stouts http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...=1#post1840444
    LECBOS. http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...ghlight=lecbos

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    • #3
      Re: Woodworking Question

      I would say to give your saw a good tune up too. It is amazing how an angle that is even slightly off can affect the outcome of a project. You can youtube table saw tune up and get some great info.
      My AviaTrix Build Thread
      The Good The Bad and The Ugly Theater/Basement Build

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      • #4
        Re: Woodworking Question

        Simple spend a few day tuning up your saw, get a Wixey angle gauge, and make yourself a sled. Miter 45's are not hard at all. getting the saw set up is the hard part.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Woodworking Question

          I think you're going to need a crosscut sled. A mitered joint is going to be challenging. Here's a link you might find helpful..

          Crayborn -- I think we cross-posted. By challenging, I mean in comparison to other methods...
          Tritrix HT:http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...d.php?t=222519
          Dayton 12" Subwoofer: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...d.php?t=222930
          Overnight Sensations: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...d.php?t=223751
          Cerberus sub: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...hlight=cerebus
          Duellatis: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...d.php?t=224943
          NTN's: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...d.php?t=227902

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Woodworking Question

            Originally posted by Soundslike View Post
            I think you're going to need a crosscut sled. A mitered joint is going to be challenging. Here's a link you might find helpful..

            Crayborn -- I think we cross-posted. By challenging, I mean in comparison to other methods...
            Understood, but its all in the set up.

            chuck

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            • #7
              Re: Woodworking Question

              Maybe I am misunderstanding the question. But, I believe he just wants to put 45 degree angles on the boards rather then a b u t t joint. If so just make sure your guide is parallel to the blade and use a sharp blade. Another thing that helps in getting a good fit on the outside edge is to cut your angle a little more that a 45 but no more that 46 degrees. Use plenty of glue and make sure when your all glued up the box is square. It would also be easier to glue two sides at a time together then remove the clamps and glue it into a box.

              Here is a jig I set up to hold the pieces while I glued them together. I was gluing up some 8' columns so the jig made it easier..
              Clamp one piece down then glue the other to it. I used brads on these since they were getting painted but you could just glue and clamp each piece to the jig and let dry. This will also hold it square for you. Once you have two sets made up glue them together.
              I should mention if you glue it up and leave it on the jig to dry make sure to put wax paper under it or you'll glue it to the jig.


              Hope this is what you were talking about.
              Dave
              http://www.pellegreneacoustics.com/

              Trench Seam Method for MDF
              https://picasaweb.google.com/101632266659473725850

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              • #8
                Re: Woodworking Question

                Dave - the glue up jig is a great idea.
                Audiophiles listen to the equipment, not the music.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Woodworking Question

                  its a bit easier with small pieces. you biting off a lot if you planing any more then a small bookshelf speaker. if you use a butjoint on the rear, you'll only have to miter one piece on both sides. good luck and dont forget the pics.
                  " To me, the soundstage presentation is more about phase and distortion and less about size. However, when you talk about bass extension, there's no replacement for displacement". Tyger23. 4.2015

                  Quote Originally Posted by hongrn. Oct 2014
                  Do you realize that being an American is like winning the biggest jackpot ever??

                  http://www.midwestaudioclub.com/spot...owell-simpson/
                  http://s413.photobucket.com/albums/pp216/arlis/

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                  • #10
                    Re: Woodworking Question

                    If you plan on mitering say the ends of a board that is 18" long by 8" wide you have to be careful not to bind the board in the saw. A safe way is to use your miter gauge in the slot of the table saw. Add an extra 3/4" when setting your fence. Clamp a small 3/4" thick board to the fence at the end closest to you. Set your board on the table against the small block. Start to push your piece towards the blade with the miter gauge. Before the board gets to the blade it should come off the small block. Now you have 3/4" space between your fence and the end of your work piece. Just hold tight to your miter gauge so it can't move. This will give you space so your board won't bind between the fence and blade.

                    Dave
                    http://www.pellegreneacoustics.com/

                    Trench Seam Method for MDF
                    https://picasaweb.google.com/101632266659473725850

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Jon Hunter
                      Marion, NY

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Woodworking Question

                        Good tips Dave -- you obviously speak from experience. The OP hasn't provided a lot of detail about what he wants to accomplish, but I gather he's planning to build an enclosure from 3/4" planks and will want to hide the end grain. If that's the case, he'll have the same issue on the top too. Once he rips the 45 degree angles on what will be the vertical edges, he'll need to crosscut a 45 degree angle on what will be the top edge. Would you agree that a sled would be the best option for this operation? Should he crosscut first, then rip?
                        Tritrix HT:http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...d.php?t=222519
                        Dayton 12" Subwoofer: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...d.php?t=222930
                        Overnight Sensations: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...d.php?t=223751
                        Cerberus sub: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...hlight=cerebus
                        Duellatis: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...d.php?t=224943
                        NTN's: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...d.php?t=227902

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Woodworking Question

                          Originally posted by Soundslike View Post
                          Good tips Dave -- you obviously speak from experience. The OP hasn't provided a lot of detail about what he wants to accomplish, but I gather he's planning to build an enclosure from 3/4" planks and will want to hide the end grain. If that's the case, he'll have the same issue on the top too. Once he rips the 45 degree angles on what will be the vertical edges, he'll need to crosscut a 45 degree angle on what will be the top edge. Would you agree that a sled would be the best option for this operation? Should he crosscut first, then rip?
                          I would agree a sled would be more stable and possibly more accurate then a miter gauge. Not to say safer. Down side is he would need to build one. I would probably cut the end grain first for two reasons. One being that when the board comes out of the saw there is a chance of getting some "blow out". Which is the last little bit could split off before it cuts. Usually it is the last 1/8" of material. This could be ripped off when cutting the boards to width. I also think it would be easier with the sides at a flat 90 degrees vs. having a sharp 45 degree to put against a miter gauge or sled.

                          Dave
                          http://www.pellegreneacoustics.com/

                          Trench Seam Method for MDF
                          https://picasaweb.google.com/101632266659473725850

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Woodworking Question

                            [QUOTE=Soundslike;1731445]Good tips Dave -- you obviously speak from experience. The OP hasn't provided a lot of detail about what he wants to accomplish, but I gather he's planning to build an enclosure from 3/4" planks and will want to hide the end grain.

                            Sorry I wasn't more clear, but you are correct. The only end grain I want to deal with will be the baffle. I have a sled, my table saw is tuned properly & I have an angle gauge. I was just looking for tips or "beware of's", which you and others have provided. Thanks to all.
                            Audiophiles listen to the equipment, not the music.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Woodworking Question

                              Originally posted by davepellegrene View Post
                              I would agree a sled would be more stable and possibly more accurate then a miter gauge. Not to say safer. Down side is he would need to build one. I would probably cut the end grain first for two reasons. One being that when the board comes out of the saw there is a chance of getting some "blow out". Which is the last little bit could split off before it cuts. Usually it is the last 1/8" of material. This could be ripped off when cutting the boards to width. I also think it would be easier with the sides at a flat 90 degrees vs. having a sharp 45 degree to put against a miter gauge or sled.

                              Dave
                              Dave, a question for you since you do these things for a living... Does putting masking tape on the cut line help eliminate or at least minimize the "blow out" you're talking about?

                              Thanks,
                              Leonard

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