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  • starting a audio/video prewiring bussiness


    Hello,I am seeking info on starting an audio/video co,could you help me on biddibg on a job that has 4 rooms of phone,data,cable 2 rooms of music and home theatre

  • #2
    Re: starting a audio/video prewiring bussiness


    > Hello,I am seeking info on starting an
    > audio/video co,could you help me on biddibg
    > on a job that has 4 rooms of
    > phone,data,cable 2 rooms of music and home
    > theatre

    Dude, get an idea of how many feet of wire you're talking about, how many outlets, how much ladder time you're gonna get, etc., etc...

    Four "rooms." That's not a description. Four 17x34 rooms, or four 8x8 rooms? Big difference.


    Comment


    • #3
      Great! Another hack enters the market! *NM*



      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Hey, everyone's got to start somewhere...


        Okay - first few jobs, do a "cost plus time" deal with the owner/contractor.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: starting a audio/video prewiring bussiness


          > Hello,I am seeking info on starting an
          > audio/video co,could you help me on biddibg
          > on a job that has 4 rooms of
          > phone,data,cable 2 rooms of music and home
          > theatre

          If you're gonna start a business doing this, it is imperative that you have work experience and know what others charge. Take a year out of your life and work for someone as a media installer. This alone will give you an edge as you'll not only learn the trick of the trade, but also have an insight to other companies' policies and prices. Then, be better than that.

          You can't hack and get away with it, either. I'm not saying you're a hack, but your communication skills are severely lacking. In order to successfully run a business, you need to be able to describe in great detail exactly what you're doing, where you plan to run cable, etc.

          You have to have insurance. Period.
          You must be licensed as a contractor. Period.
          You have to get permits (where applicable). Period.

          Trust me, the first rule of business is experience IN the business. You can't get rich quick and expect business to sustain itself.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: starting a audio/video prewiring bussiness


            I cannot agree enough with Aaron. Where I am located, we encounter the "Two Scmucks in a Truck" graduates of one drill, one ladder and one truck school of structured wiring every week. They usually last about long enough to get into about three to four houses then run out of money before they get to trim or even close to install.

            AFTER you become proficient in what Aaron suggested (insurance and any applicable certifications/liscensure/etc...) you can start talking to customers. I carry a 1M/1M/1M auto policy AND a 2M contractors policy...and I feel that is JUST enough. However it is no where NEAR enough to cover the potential ineptness when trying to talk to customers. Customers that are looking at a comprehensive structured wiring package and/or entertainment package usually fall into two groups.

            1: The Guy That Has Too Much Time On His Hands And Researches EVERYTHING Online. This guy is already a subject matter expert and is looking to chew some poor bastard in half if his integrator even remotely suggests something that deviates from what his 3,842 online buddies say. Nevermind that he does not have the motor skills to operate a phillips screwdriver.

            2: The Guy That Has WAY Too Much Money. This guy is great except for one thing...as a rule people who aquire that much money are not generally stupid. Their red flags will blaze if they catch a whiff of anything remotely suggesting incompetence. Can't blame them, I wouldn't want someone less than stellar touching my home.

            Both of these guys will chew major *** if their system is not perfect. I wired probably 250 homes last year and very few end up "perfect". Remember, it doesn't matter if it is perfect to you...

            There are tons of things that can happen between the time you wire and the time you trim...and regardless of who did what, you are going to be held responsible. Cabinet dude shoots a screw through your wire...fix it. Framing dude comes back for a punch out and f's up your run...fix it. Drywall dude doesn't bother cutting out your holes...fix it.

            And the big one! You didn't think to have CYA materials and at the end the customer states you didn't wire it to his specifications and you are rewiring the whole house...and eat that whole caca-sandwich without sugar.

            That being said, if you are doing a job for a buddy that does not care about professionalism, you can generally figure on the high side (per run if homerun) of about 80' per drop. $8 per run of crap (i.e. staples, tie straps, J-boxes, etc...) and GOK labor time to accomplish.

            It's hard to believe, but it's tougher than you might think wiring houses (if you are going to do more than one)...

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: starting a audio/video prewiring bussiness


              I'm a big fan of sign offs...

              Back about 20 years ago, I was running a small typesetting outfit. I agreed to put in a network for a client - no big thing - they just wanted to share a group of files. I quoted 'em on hardware and software, and a little time to set it up. No big deal, because I'd been doing business with 'em for a couple of years.

              I get to their place. Instead of one room with everything accessible, they've got two. And now rather than just running coax and some t's under the baseboards, they want to go into the walls. And they've got one POS bad-name-went-broke clone that flat-out wouldn't work with the lowliest plain vanilla network card.

              "But you told us you could do this for under a thousand!"

              This is when they became the client from hell. I ended up taking their computer out overnight, and dropping in a clone mommyboard I had lying around. I'll bet they never noticed that it looked different either... I probably lost about $150 on the materials end (longer wire runs), and essentially got hosed for two days of labor. After I got the network software set up, I logged on, pointed at the right drive, and told them that they could worry about setting up their own damn training.

              > I cannot agree enough with Aaron. Where I am
              > located, we encounter the "Two Scmucks
              > in a Truck" graduates of one drill, one
              > ladder and one truck school of structured
              > wiring every week. They usually last about
              > long enough to get into about three to four
              > houses then run out of money before they get
              > to trim or even close to install.

              > AFTER you become proficient in what Aaron
              > suggested (insurance and any applicable
              > certifications/liscensure/etc...) you can
              > start talking to customers. I carry a
              > 1M/1M/1M auto policy AND a 2M contractors
              > policy...and I feel that is JUST enough.
              > However it is no where NEAR enough to cover
              > the potential ineptness when trying to talk
              > to customers. Customers that are looking at
              > a comprehensive structured wiring package
              > and/or entertainment package usually fall
              > into two groups.

              > 1: The Guy That Has Too Much Time On His
              > Hands And Researches EVERYTHING Online. This
              > guy is already a subject matter expert and
              > is looking to chew some poor bastard in half
              > if his integrator even remotely suggests
              > something that deviates from what his 3,842
              > online buddies say. Nevermind that he does
              > not have the motor skills to operate a
              > phillips screwdriver.

              > 2: The Guy That Has WAY Too Much Money. This
              > guy is great except for one thing...as a
              > rule people who aquire that much money are
              > not generally stupid. Their red flags will
              > blaze if they catch a whiff of anything
              > remotely suggesting incompetence. Can't
              > blame them, I wouldn't want someone less
              > than stellar touching my home.

              > Both of these guys will chew major *** if
              > their system is not perfect. I wired
              > probably 250 homes last year and very few
              > end up "perfect". Remember, it
              > doesn't matter if it is perfect to you...

              > There are tons of things that can happen
              > between the time you wire and the time you
              > trim...and regardless of who did what, you
              > are going to be held responsible. Cabinet
              > dude shoots a screw through your wire...fix
              > it. Framing dude comes back for a punch out
              > and f's up your run...fix it. Drywall dude
              > doesn't bother cutting out your holes...fix
              > it.

              > And the big one! You didn't think to have
              > CYA materials and at the end the customer
              > states you didn't wire it to his
              > specifications and you are rewiring the
              > whole house...and eat that whole
              > caca-sandwich without sugar.

              > That being said, if you are doing a job for
              > a buddy that does not care about
              > professionalism, you can generally figure on
              > the high side (per run if homerun) of about
              > 80' per drop. $8 per run of crap (i.e.
              > staples, tie straps, J-boxes, etc...) and
              > GOK labor time to accomplish.

              > It's hard to believe, but it's tougher than
              > you might think wiring houses (if you are
              > going to do more than one)...

              Comment

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