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  • For all you who know capacitors. Is this true...

    If you connect 2 like capacitors in series to a voltage, will the voltage will be divided between the 2?

    Let's say you're power source is 100volts. Does each cap get 50 volts?

  • #2
    Re: For all you who know capacitors. Is this true...

    Short answer Yes...
    This may help ( see Kirschoff's Voltage Law )
    http://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/capacitor/cap_7.html



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    • #3
      Re: For all you who know capacitors. Is this true...

      Originally posted by Sydney View Post
      Short answer Yes...
      This may help ( see Kirschoff's Voltage Law )
      http://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/capacitor/cap_7.html



      Thanks for that link. I'll actually read that from the very beginning page once i finish what I'm reading now. I'm reading a very informative paper on crossover design. Very helpful. I won't continue on into the paper if I bump into something that throws me off. I was in aware that this happened in capacitors. I would think that they would both just get equal voltages but I guess since they are in series it changes things a bit.

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      • #4
        Re: For all you who know capacitors. Is this true...

        Consider Voltage analogous to Pressure.
        Resistance in a mechanical pipe causes pressure drop.
        Assuming the devices are identical ( caps in this case ) the drop across each is equal.
        Kirchhoff's laws can be related to conservation of energy
        Last edited by Sydney; 07-21-2012, 01:32 PM. Reason: spl., clarity
        "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
        “Pride is your greatest enemy, humility is your greatest friend.”
        "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

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        • #5
          Re: For all you who know capacitors. Is this true...

          If they're truly IDENTICAL, then the voltage is split between them. For DC, you'd place some very high value resistors of equal value across the caps, so that leakage differences are minimized.

          Caps of equal value in series present a cap of half the value of one of them, but twice the voltage rating.

          Example: a pair of 2uF 50V caps in series will result in 1uF 100V. In parallel, 4uF and 50V rating.
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          • #6
            Re: For all you who know capacitors. Is this true...

            If you're talking DC voltage, then no. Capacitor resistance isn't defined or specified except in min terms. For dc voltage, you'd nwant to shunt each cap with a large resistor to set the dc leakage so they balance.
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            • #7
              Re: For all you who know capacitors. Is this true...

              If they're truly IDENTICAL, then the voltage is split between them. For DC, you'd place some very high value resistors of equal value across the caps, so that leakage differences are minimized.

              Caps of equal value in series present a cap of half the value of one of them, but twice the voltage rating.

              Example: a pair of 2uF 50V caps in series will result in 1uF 100V. In parallel, 4uF and 50V rating.

              Ah, so backwards from calculating resistors?

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              • #8
                Re: For all you who know capacitors. Is this true...

                I'm speaking in terms of a crossover. Which would be AC voltage correct?

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                • #9
                  Re: For all you who know capacitors. Is this true...

                  Originally posted by RDK View Post
                  Ah, so backwards from calculating resistors?
                  Correct
                  "When capacitors are connected in series, the total capacitance is less than any one of the series capacitors' individual capacitances. If two or more capacitors are connected in series, the overall effect is that of a single (equivalent) capacitor having the sum total of the plate spacings of the individual capacitors. As we've just seen, an increase in plate spacing, with all other factors unchanged, results in decreased capacitance. "
                  From
                  http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_1/chpt_13/4.html

                  • Capacitances diminish in series.
                  • Capacitances add in parallel.
                  "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
                  “Pride is your greatest enemy, humility is your greatest friend.”
                  "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

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                  • #10
                    Re: For all you who know capacitors. Is this true...

                    Originally posted by Sydney View Post
                    Correct
                    "When capacitors are connected in series, the total capacitance is less than any one of the series capacitors' individual capacitances. If two or more capacitors are connected in series, the overall effect is that of a single (equivalent) capacitor having the sum total of the plate spacings of the individual capacitors. As we've just seen, an increase in plate spacing, with all other factors unchanged, results in decreased capacitance. "
                    From
                    http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_1/chpt_13/4.html

                    • Capacitances diminish in series.
                    • Capacitances add in parallel.
                    The value is the inverse of the sum of the inverse of each cap.

                    A series connected set of 1uf, 2uf, and 4uf would be 1/(1+.5+.25) = .57uF
                    R = h/(2*pi*m*c) and don't you forget it! || Periodic Table as redrawn by Marshall Freerks and Ignatius Schumacher || King Crimson Radio
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                    • #11
                      Re: For all you who know capacitors. Is this true...

                      Originally posted by RDK View Post
                      Ah, so backwards from calculating resistors?
                      Yes. They are calculated the opposite of a resistor or inductor.

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                      • #12
                        Re: For all you who know capacitors. Is this true...

                        Originally posted by bwaslo View Post
                        If you're talking DC voltage, then no. Capacitor resistance isn't defined or specified except in min terms. For dc voltage, you'd nwant to shunt each cap with a large resistor to set the dc leakage so they balance.
                        +1

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