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Do Crossovers Get Hot?

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  • #16
    Re: Do Crossovers Get Hot?

    Originally posted by davepellegrene View Post
    Ok, since I've been provoked.

    This was the first crossover I had ever built and went a little nuts with the hot glue as well.




    Dave
    This thread delivers! Nice pic of the toasty crossover. Was the other speaker just fine?
    -Dan
    Mandolin Curved Cabinet Floorstanding; Dayton Reference 18" sealed Subwoofer; Sealed 12" Dayton Reference Subwoofer ; Overnight Sensation builds

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    • #17
      Re: Do Crossovers Get Hot?

      Originally posted by djkest View Post
      This thread delivers! Nice pic of the toasty crossover. Was the other speaker just fine?
      No, it wasn't as bad but probably one more song and maybe one more notch and it would have been there.
      Surprisingly the music was clean. I pay close attention when I play my system that hard.


      My wife was sitting outside the room on the deck and motioned for me to come out. She says there is smoke coming out of the speaker. I just laughed and went back in. She wasn't kidding. Smoke was rolling out of the ribbin. I thought I fried it but it was fine that's just where the smoke finally escaped. Talk about a buzz kill.

      Dave
      http://www.pellegreneacoustics.com/

      Trench Seam Method for MDF
      https://picasaweb.google.com/101632266659473725850

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      • #18
        Re: Do Crossovers Get Hot?

        Unbelievable.

        Looks like I'll be playing the speakers really loud on those cold winter nights...

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        • #19
          Re: Do Crossovers Get Hot?

          Originally posted by PEB View Post
          For example a 40ohm resistor across the woofer's series inductor is no problem. It is A) close to the amp, and B) sees low frequency, but C) is a high value.
          Agreed.

          Originally posted by PEB View Post
          A 1ohm resistor in series with the first cap in a tweeter circuit is A) close to the amp, B) sees low(ish) frequency, and C) is low resistance. So it is a problem.
          I'm sorry, Phil- but since signal is AC, the cap will prevent low frequncies from being seen by that resistor. If this is your standard fare HP for a 2-way, I think it'll be fine as I've done this before.
          If this is on a midrange circuit, and either across the driver or in series with a large capacitor, things can indeed change for the worse.

          Another ROF (ask Chris Roemer) I use is if it's above 25 ohms, I can usually use a 5W resistor.
          Later,
          Wolf
          "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
          "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
          "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
          "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

          *InDIYana event website*

          Photobucket pages:
          http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

          My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
          http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

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          • #20
            Re: Do Crossovers Get Hot?

            Dave,

            everything you do is just outstanding. most impressive crossover i have ever seen.
            craigk

            " Voicing is often the term used for band aids to cover for initial design/planning errors " - Pallas

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