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Atlantic Technology's Hybrid-Pressure Acceleration System

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  • Atlantic Technology's Hybrid-Pressure Acceleration System

    ..or H-PAS

    Just read a particularly gushing article on Stereophile; the design is supposed to combine all the best attributes of TL's, Horns, sealed and Vented cabs.

    cabinet section here

    http://www.soundandvision.com/conten...peakers-page-4

    stereophile gushing review here

    http://www.stereophile.com/content/a...-1-loudspeaker

    the chamber near the vent exit - whats that for?

  • #2
    Re: Atlantic Technology's Hybrid-Pressure Acceleration System

    Originally posted by bill poster View Post
    ..or H-PAS

    Just read a particularly gushing article on Stereophile; the design is supposed to combine all the best attributes of TL's, Horns, sealed and Vented cabs.

    cabinet section here

    http://www.soundandvision.com/conten...peakers-page-4

    stereophile gushing review here

    http://www.stereophile.com/content/a...-1-loudspeaker

    the chamber near the vent exit - whats that for?
    H-PAS was invented by Phil Clements and licensed to Atlantic Sound. Phil also uses it in his own brand, Solus. H-PAS possesses trade-offs like any other system, but one thing is for sure, it does produce a lot of deep bass for the size of driver and cabinet used.

    Phil was one of the judges at the MWAF the same year I was and we sat beside each other for the day evaluating the speakers. He's a very nice guy.

    The H-PAS is sort of an MLTL design that includes an internal resonance chamber that functions as a trap for higher frequency resonances, so he uses little to no internal damping material. This allows him to get maximum efficiency out of the system with the fewest losses.

    I was invited to his room at CEDIA a couple of years ago for personal demo. It was really quite impressive. I wanted to look for the hidden subwoofer, but I believed him when he said there wasn't one. I believe Martin King worked out a mathematical model for the system, it is very complex.

    Jeff
    Click here for Jeff Bagby's Loudspeaker Design Software

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    • #3
      Re: Atlantic Technology's Hybrid-Pressure Acceleration System

      So, is it DIYable?

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      • #4
        Re: Atlantic Technology's Hybrid-Pressure Acceleration System

        Is it like blowing air over a jug lip?
        Kenny

        http://www.diy-ny.com/
        DIY NY/NJ 2014 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FGwA...ature=youtu.be
        Man does not live by measurements alone, a little music helps.

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        • #5
          Re: Atlantic Technology's Hybrid-Pressure Acceleration System

          Originally posted by djg View Post
          So, is it DIYable?
          I wouldn't know where to begin. So, for me, I'd say no. At least it would take a lot of trail and error to tune, that's for sure.
          Click here for Jeff Bagby's Loudspeaker Design Software

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          • #6
            Re: Atlantic Technology's Hybrid-Pressure Acceleration System

            Originally posted by kenny_k View Post
            Is it like blowing air over a jug lip?
            We'll it's designed to be a trap, but it is a form of internal Helmholtz chamber. These aren't new, by the way, they have been used for years in some old horn loaded systems and muti-chamber reflex systems. Phil just used it in a slightly different way that seems pretty effective.
            Click here for Jeff Bagby's Loudspeaker Design Software

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            • #7
              Re: Atlantic Technology's Hybrid-Pressure Acceleration System

              I would bet it is close to what Gemme Audio did. Some of the cleanest and deepest bass from small drivers and reasonable size cabs I have heard.
              craigk

              " Voicing is often the term used for band aids to cover for initial design/planning errors " - Pallas

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              • #8
                Re: Atlantic Technology's Hybrid-Pressure Acceleration System

                Bill F. should be along shortly to tell us it's from the 40s.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Atlantic Technology's Hybrid-Pressure Acceleration System

                  Several members of this Forum have been designing and building MLTLs for nearly a decade. Thanks to Martin J. King's software, we already know how to get deep bass from small drivers. Close enough to H-PAS capability among us DIY'ers.

                  Jim

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                  • #10
                    Re: Atlantic Technology's Hybrid-Pressure Acceleration System

                    It sort of reminds me of an old Yamaha 2 stroke motocross bike exhaust.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Atlantic Technology's Hybrid-Pressure Acceleration System

                      Originally posted by Jeff B. View Post
                      We'll it's designed to be a trap, but it is a form of internal Helmholtz chamber. These aren't new, by the way, they have been used for years in some old horn loaded systems and muti-chamber reflex systems. Phil just used it in a slightly different way that seems pretty effective.
                      interested as to why a chamber near the exit wd be more effective than near the driver (a la visaton TL design)?

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                      • #12
                        Re: Atlantic Technology's Hybrid-Pressure Acceleration System

                        Originally posted by craigk View Post
                        I would bet it is close to what Gemme Audio did. Some of the cleanest and deepest bass from small drivers and reasonable size cabs I have heard.
                        Gemme Audio's design is a mass-loaded rear horn. Someone from Gemme Audio was once on DIYAudio.com talking about the concept and the results they obtained, which were spectacular from such a small Fostex driver. Hornresp can model one of these if you get creative with the horn sections, but like all horns, they are complex to design and build.

                        My best guess about H-PAS is that it is an ML-TL with a tapering cross section and the port coupled to the line some distance away from what would normally be the physical end of the line. I don't think that the chamber acts as a "bass trap" - it would just act as part of the line. That's just based on my understanding of how TLs work.
                        Best Regards,

                        Rory Buszka
                        Product Manager, Dayton Audio

                        The best way to predict the future is to create it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Atlantic Technology's Hybrid-Pressure Acceleration System

                          Originally posted by RoryB@daytonaudio.com View Post
                          I don't think that the chamber acts as a "bass trap"
                          It could. Their claim is that it suppresses pipe frequency harmonics that accompany the desired 1/4 wavelength output of the terminus. With the right configuration it might suppress the second harmonic, but it can't suppress both the second and third. Stuffing the line will, and that doesn't add to the size of the box, so IMO that's probably the better option.
                          www.billfitzmaurice.com
                          www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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                          • #14
                            Re: Atlantic Technology's Hybrid-Pressure Acceleration System

                            When I design ML-TLs, if the driver is located at the ~1/5 point from the closed end, the system response is usually the smoothest when the port is located a few inches from the other end of the line. When, however, the driver is located at the ~1/3 point from the closed end, the optimum location for the port is more like 10 inches from the other end of the line, particularly when the line's length is more than ~40". These port locations are not absolutes, however, as each design can be tweaked in the modeling to achieve a desired system bass response with the tuning coming partly from the line's 1/4-wavelength resonance and partly from the port's dimensions. One can also combine tapered and mass-loaded configurations, perhaps with the driver in a coupling chamber, for good results.
                            Paul

                            Originally posted by RoryB@daytonaudio.com View Post
                            Gemme Audio's design is a mass-loaded rear horn. Someone from Gemme Audio was once on DIYAudio.com talking about the concept and the results they obtained, which were spectacular from such a small Fostex driver. Hornresp can model one of these if you get creative with the horn sections, but like all horns, they are complex to design and build.

                            My best guess about H-PAS is that it is an ML-TL with a tapering cross section and the port coupled to the line some distance away from what would normally be the physical end of the line. I don't think that the chamber acts as a "bass trap" - it would just act as part of the line. That's just based on my understanding of how TLs work.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Atlantic Technology's Hybrid-Pressure Acceleration System

                              Originally posted by craigk View Post
                              I would bet it is close to what Gemme Audio did. Some of the cleanest and deepest bass from small drivers and reasonable size cabs I have heard.
                              No, it isn't. I happen to chat once in a while with one of the former owner of Gemme Audio and it's more like a horn.

                              See by yourself...

                              Click image for larger version

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                              Take a look and you won't see any resonance chamber like in the H-PAS...

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