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Finishing Q's: Re: High-Heat Automotive Paints....

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  • #31
    Re: Finishing Q's: Re: High-Heat Automotive Paints....

    Whenever I've done high-sensitivity paint jobs with serious piano-lacquer (and not just the faux variety) finishes, I use a climate-controlled shop with low humidity and an adjustable "baking" setup using lamps or heating units to dry the material after finishing construction ... aka once the raw piece is done, I let it sit at unnaturally high temperatures like 125 degrees until it's totally dried out so the joints can move if they like, and then it can be sanded, filled and sealed. Bake it once more at a low temperature and look for movement, then do the final sanding and sealing. Then on go the basecoats and waiting .. then the final, volatile lacquer that has to be baked at higher temperatures. Has always worked for me, and it prevents joints showing up due to age. You could do something like this with little more than a dehumidifier and some lamps. For those who are worrying about the MDF picking up moisture again - well, people who buy seriously-finished speakers usually do not remove drivers or mess with anything.
    I am trolling you.

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    • #32
      Re: Finishing Q's: Re: High-Heat Automotive Paints....

      Better engineered speaker cabinets or any other cabinets will have joints that are either designed properly or the expansion and contraction of the MDF (plywood) becomes a design element. Not removing drivers from the speaker has little to do with why and how the cabinetwork either lasts or perishes. Early Sonus Faber speakers made with the stave of solid maple were know to split and crack. Some of the low end to mid-range Italian furniture finished with variety of backed on polyester coatings also suffered from this symptoms, especially then panels were butted and glued.

      In addition to what Bob said about blushing.
      Having a fast evaporating solvent usually means, the finish with start curing very fast, and the amount of dust caught would be minimized. Problem is then the solvent evaporates, it cools off the surface of the paint and the moisture settles on it, creating the milky film effect. So, it's a catch 22.
      http://www.diy-ny.com/

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      • #33
        Re: Finishing Q's: Re: High-Heat Automotive Paints....

        I have neither the software nor the patience (or money) to worry about micrometers in products I do not have the time to test in a controlled environment before I sell them. And yes, it is a small concern, but it's the only one I can think of when we're talking about perfectionist paints and cabinets in this context.
        I am trolling you.

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