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  • XSim free schematic-based crossover designer program

    I'm announcing the public release of XSim, a "free-form" Windows-based passive crossover design and simulation program intended to be as intuitive and non-restrictive as possible. . The program is ***free*** for personal or commercial use. Any speaker builder with at least a basic understanding of what resistors, capacitors, and inductors do, and with decent response measurements (FRD and ZMA) of their drivers in their boxes, should be able to get useful results right away.

    download from:
    http://libinst.com/Xsim/XSimSetup.exe

    Experimenting with "ideal" driver data (the default for each driver) can also be fun and helpful in understanding the effects of various circuit types. Some built-in multi-part "Circuit Blocks" also provide for basic pre-configured circuits to be tuned per their overall parameters (Q, corner frequency, attenuation, etc). There are "Example" files inlcuded in the XSim download (currently less than 1.5MB) as well.

    XSim allows you to see simultaneous multiple graphs of your choice, including impedances, voltages, power consumptions, group delay, and frequency, impulse, step, and square wave responses. You can watch the performance and/or stress on any part vary as you tune structure or component values in real-time. The circuit network is re-solved automatically with every change you make.

    The "free-form" aspect of XSim is that crossover designs are unrestricted, no particular circuit structure need be used. Essentially any R-L-C passive network you can think of can be easily entered using graphical schematic entry, with results calculated as you design. A common "ground" node is provided, but its use isn't required.



    Circuit designs (incuding all in included driver data sets) can be shared by email or forum post in XSim's ".dxo" format. Graphic files can also be saved in standard picture file formats.

    Stuff yet to come:
    The release version of XSim featiures automatic downloading of part and driver information based on vendor and part number, making it easy to find and order what you need to turn your design into working hardware. However, no vendors are as yet signed up to provide XSim access to part or driver information. XSim will be able to download these lists itself, when available. XSim can also update its own program (with owner permission) so people who use it online can always be up-to-date. ...And so I can add or fix features without asking you to deal with downloading and installing each time.

    XSim does not yet include geometric features (such as varying mic position, baffle or boundary-bounce effects) as in Jeff Bagby's very successful "PCD" and other programs derived from it. But that is in the works, with some assistance from Jeff. There are also as yet no box-design features, but this is also planned so that full designs can be worked with using the infinite baffle data provided by vendors.
    Free & Free-form simulator/designer for Passive Crossovers
    SynergyCalc 5: design spreadsheet for Wooden horns and DIY Synergy Waveguides
    Super easy and cheap to make high performance sound diffusers

  • #2
    Re: XSim free schematic-based crossover designer program

    YAAAAAHHHHH!!!

    To anyone interested, this is a very useful XO tool. If you have any questions about using it, I don't mind trying to answer them. It's quite different than PCD. PCD has some things I keep going back for, and this has some really advanced features that PCD couldn't offer because it was excel based. I'm sure Jeff would agree, not a slight towards his program which has been my go to for years now.

    Thanks Bill and congratulations.
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCm2...oSKdB448TTVEnQ

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: XSim free schematic-based crossover designer program

      Hi Bill,

      When Jeff made some comments earlier that hinted at this, I suspected it would be something like this. I've been updating my program to provide more in the way of geometric features, that math part is done, but the third party software I used for plots is buggy. Since that part is close to ready, it may be my last update.

      Looks like with the release of this, further development of WinPCD would be a moot point.

      I'll be checking it out. If you don't mind my asking, what did you use to develop it? The graphic schematic entry was what I would have liked to do, but that was not an option for me at the time.

      dlr
      WinPCD - Windows .NET Passive Crossover Designer

      Dave's Speaker Pages

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: XSim free schematic-based crossover designer program

        Thanks Bill, look forward to using it.
        Kenny

        http://www.diy-ny.com/
        DIY NY/NJ 2014 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FGwA...ature=youtu.be
        Man does not live by measurements alone, a little music helps.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: XSim free schematic-based crossover designer program

          Hi DLR,

          It was done in Delphi (a windows-oriented graphical Pascal language that makes very fast and compact code). I had a pretty good library of functions from previous measurement system programs so that was a boost. The graphs use the TeeChart component, which I'm not crazy about, but I've still been pretty successful in beating into submission!

          I actually started this because I wanted to see what I could do with all-pass filters to straighten out phase in DIY Synergy speaker. I also like to toss other components across networks sometimes, and that can be hard to implement in reasonable sized fixed-structure schematics. I've worked with some of those things before by misusing an RF simulator (RFSim99) but that was getting too difficult to handle as it wasn't made for audio crossovers and got upset with multiple file sets.

          Have you done any work with baffle edge reflections yet? I'm still puzzling how to let the user enter baffle/box dimensions without having to read a manual (that's were most users stop -- when they have to look in a manual!).
          Free & Free-form simulator/designer for Passive Crossovers
          SynergyCalc 5: design spreadsheet for Wooden horns and DIY Synergy Waveguides
          Super easy and cheap to make high performance sound diffusers

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: XSim free schematic-based crossover designer program

            Originally posted by bwaslo View Post
            Hi DLR,

            It was done in Delphi (a windows-oriented graphical Pascal language that makes very fast and compact code). I had a pretty good library of functions from previous measurement system programs so that was a boost. The graphs use the TeeChart component, which I'm not crazy about, but I've still been pretty successful in beating into submission!

            I actually started this because I wanted to see what I could do with all-pass filters to straighten out phase in DIY Synergy speaker. I also like to toss other components across networks sometimes, and that can be hard to implement in reasonable sized fixed-structure schematics. I've worked with some of those things before by misusing an RF simulator (RFSim99) but that was getting too difficult to handle as it wasn't made for audio crossovers and got upset with multiple file sets.

            Have you done any work with baffle edge reflections yet? I'm still puzzling how to let the user enter baffle/box dimensions without having to read a manual (that's were most users stop -- when they have to look in a manual!).
            I'm familiar with Delphi and thought it might be that. I seemed to recall reference to Delphi some time ago, maybe when you were working on Praxis. I spent (too) many years in pure Pascal at my last employer, a big partof the readon for my dive into WinPCD.

            I have not yet looked into the diffraction aspect. That's one of my biggest interests. The user interface may be the hardest part, although my math skills in translating to code isn't ideal. That might be a good next step on my side.

            dlr
            WinPCD - Windows .NET Passive Crossover Designer

            Dave's Speaker Pages

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: XSim free schematic-based crossover designer program

              Wow! That's cool! Very intuitive. Thanks.
              Craig

              The lowest possible F3 box alignment is not always the best alignment.

              Designing and building speaker projects are like playing with adult Lego Blocks for me.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: XSim free schematic-based crossover designer program

                Very nice Bill!
                I've been looking for a replacement for Speaker Workshop - sometimes I like to play with arbitrary topologies,
                and for some reason it hasn't been running well for me.
                Now that I mentioned that, how about permutation support for component values?

                I think I hear a difference - wow, it's amazing!" Ethan Winer: audio myths
                "As God is my witness I'll never be without a good pair of speakers!" Scarlett O'Hara

                High value, high quality RS150/TB28-537SH bookshelf - TARGAS NLA!
                SB13/Vifa BC25SC06 MTM DCR Galeons-SB13-MTM
                My Voxel min sub Yet-another-Voxel-build

                Tangband W6-sub

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: XSim free schematic-based crossover designer program

                  Bill, can the program compensate for time alignment of 2-ways in the xover design phase?
                  Live in Southern N.E.? check out the CT Audio Society web site.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: XSim free schematic-based crossover designer program

                    Donarick -- what is 'permutation support'?

                    carlspeak -- the program uses whatever phase is in the FRD files. You can add or subtract delay from any of them via their tune windows per your situation, and tweak the crossover design accordingly.

                    The best way to do it is: take three measurements (with Omnimic, Arta, REW, HolmImpulse, CLIO, etc.) of the drivers in your box/baffle-
                    First one of the tweeter alone.
                    Second of both tweeter and woofer in parallel playing together
                    Third of the midwoofer alone.
                    Also get ZMA measurements for each with WT3, WT2, or DATS.

                    Then bring the first and third measurements into XSim for the drivers, and model the situation where both played together (connect the drivers in parallel and feed from the amplifier). The frequency response will show the result. Use the "Curves" menu to also bring up the FRD file you MEASURED of both playing together, and in the drivers' tune windows adjust the delay of the tweeter (or midwoofer) until the dB curves of simulated and measured results match. Leave the delay setting there and start designing your crossover.

                    (This is roughly equivalent to Jeff Bagby's technique, though he recommends using Hilbert phase - you can also do that in XSim via the drivers' Tune windows).
                    Free & Free-form simulator/designer for Passive Crossovers
                    SynergyCalc 5: design spreadsheet for Wooden horns and DIY Synergy Waveguides
                    Super easy and cheap to make high performance sound diffusers

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: XSim free schematic-based crossover designer program

                      Originally posted by bwaslo View Post
                      Donarick -- what is 'permutation support'?

                      carlspeak -- the program uses whatever phase is in the FRD files. You can add or subtract delay from any of them via their tune windows per your situation, and tweak the crossover design accordingly.

                      The best way to do it is: take three measurements (with Omnimic, Arta, REW, HolmImpulse, CLIO, etc.) of the drivers in your box/baffle-
                      First one of the tweeter alone.
                      Second of both tweeter and woofer in parallel playing together
                      Third of the midwoofer alone.
                      Also get ZMA measurements for each with WT3, WT2, or DATS.

                      Then bring the first and third measurements into XSim for the drivers, and model the situation where both played together (connect the drivers in parallel and feed from the amplifier). The frequency response will show the result. Use the "Curves" menu to also bring up the FRD file you MEASURED of both playing together, and in the drivers' tune windows adjust the delay of the tweeter (or midwoofer) until the dB curves of simulated and measured results match. Leave the delay setting there and start designing your crossover.

                      (This is roughly equivalent to Jeff Bagby's technique, though he recommends using Hilbert phase - you can also do that in XSim via the drivers' Tune windows).
                      Actually, I included minimum phase extractions in my paper just because I didn't want to leave this out entirely, but I personally typically use the raw measured phase from Omnimic and find the offset using it.

                      I covered this in my seminar last December and showed that the calculated relative offset was different if you used extracted minimum phase or Omnimic measured phase simply because Omnimic doesn't allow you to lock the time marker for the impulse response. However, I explained that this difference was really inconsequential and that the only thing that really mattered was that you were able to enter an offset than allowed the program to sum the two responses and arrive at the identical response you got when you measured the drivers together. This is what's important, the rest is just numbers.

                      Jeff
                      Click here for Jeff Bagby's Loudspeaker Design Software

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: XSim free schematic-based crossover designer program

                        Originally posted by Jeff B. View Post
                        I covered this in my seminar last December and showed that the calculated relative offset was different if you used extracted minimum phase or Omnimic measured phase simply because Omnimic doesn't allow you to lock the time marker for the impulse response. However, I explained that this difference was really inconsequential and that the only thing that really mattered was that you were able to enter an offset than allowed the program to sum the two responses and arrive at the identical response you got when you measured the drivers together. This is what's important, the rest is just numbers.
                        Jeff, how much difference is there in the off-axis summation if minimum phase is not used? Seems to me that there would be some amount of error and that the difference won't always be the same if a time marker cannot be locked.

                        dlr
                        WinPCD - Windows .NET Passive Crossover Designer

                        Dave's Speaker Pages

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: XSim free schematic-based crossover designer program

                          IIRC, permutation support in Speaker Workshop is something like:
                          "plot FR for the current crossover" while stepping the value of say, C2 from 2uF to 4uF in .2uF increments

                          I think I hear a difference - wow, it's amazing!" Ethan Winer: audio myths
                          "As God is my witness I'll never be without a good pair of speakers!" Scarlett O'Hara

                          High value, high quality RS150/TB28-537SH bookshelf - TARGAS NLA!
                          SB13/Vifa BC25SC06 MTM DCR Galeons-SB13-MTM
                          My Voxel min sub Yet-another-Voxel-build

                          Tangband W6-sub

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: XSim free schematic-based crossover designer program

                            Originally posted by Jeff B. View Post
                            I covered this in my seminar last December and showed that the calculated relative offset was different if you used extracted minimum phase or Omnimic measured phase simply because Omnimic doesn't allow you to lock the time marker for the impulse response.


                            Once again I'm reminded of the pain and sorrow that missing this seminar has brought upon my general state of being. Perhaps a bootleg (unappoved) video tape of the seminar will show up on youtube someday.....



                            Please note that this is a true note of sarcasm with jest intended....
                            DARPA Jr - 2015 InDIYana Winner - RS180-8 + RS100P-8 + ND25FA
                            The Aria's - RS150-4 (or RS150-8) + XT25SC90
                            The Mariposa's - TEBM65C20F-8 + ND16FA
                            The Canzonetta's - RS100P-8 and ND16FA
                            AudioSource AMP-100 Mods OR Pyle PAMP1000 Mods

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                            • #15
                              Re: XSim free schematic-based crossover designer program

                              As one of the beta-testers of Xsim I want to give it my endorsement. I suspect I will continue to use PCD for as long as it will continue to work on my computer, but there will be times when Xsim will be chosen due to it's advantages.

                              I know that Neil and dlr have both created PCD based programs that operate outside the MS Excel environment. These programs are intuitive (especially if you have used PCD), accurate, and for most people will accomplish everything they need 95% of the time. Just freeing themselves from Excel is a wonderful advantage for many people. I don't want to take anything away from the hard work these guys have done to create these programs. I am in a unique position to be able to understand just how much work it can be too. I encourage you, if you have been using programs like WinPCD, to continue to keep it in your repertoire.

                              But.... Xsim takes all of this in the direction it really needs to go. Besides the additional graphs of the impulse and step response, etc., it offers two features that truly set it apart -
                              1. Simple drag and drop schematic building and
                              2. The ability to simulate essentially any crossover you can imagine, even with multiple drivers.

                              These represent a welcome evolutionary leap from PCD and give you, the designer, much more flexibility and power in your crossover design. Obviously, the circuit inside PCD has been adequate for the vast majority of the design work out there, but now you are no longer limited to that circuit model and you will have the flexibility to try new circuits you could not work with in the past using PCD, Including complex contour circuits and ladder all-pass delay circuits, just to name a couple.

                              From my testing Bill's program appears to be very accurate and I can recreate projects from PCD with identical results. I appreciate all of Bill's contributions to the community and giving this to us for free is a wonderful gift.

                              Jeff B.
                              Click here for Jeff Bagby's Loudspeaker Design Software

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