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DIY Flat Panel Speaker Love

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  • While I love his YouTube channel, those speakers are going to be a complete mess for HF reproduction, and forget LF all together. For midrange they WILL work, but to get a smooth output the thing needs to be so damped you may as well forget any efficiency advantage from a radiator of that size. He states that these produce sound the same way a piano soundboard does, which IS true, but he goes on to say traditional cone speakers produce sound “artificially” while wooden resonances are “natural.” Sorry, sound is vibrating air and that’s it. It really doesn’t matter what makes it vibrate. A controlled and predictable speaker cone is significantly more accurate than a random piece of wood/plastic/composite material vibrating. Isn’t the goal of speakers to accurately reproduce recordings?

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    • DML's are great for mid to high frequencies as they are basically full range speakers being able to play from 60hz-20khz. Of course its all design dependent as the better the design the better they will sound. The low frequencies are not as good due to the limited pistonic excursion. Conventional cone drivers move more air to produce bass while DML's vibrate the panel (less air movement) which is why a larger sized panel is needed to produce lower frequencies because it needs to bend the panels hence the term bending wave transducers. EPS needs to be thin (5-10mm) 1/2-1/4 inch to flex enough to produce adequate bass. T.I. video uses 1inch XPS which is to thick. Also EPS is more flexible then XPS.

      There are two types of damping. One is panel treatment damping usually done with a 50/50 water/glue mixture or even paint water based or oil based. The other type of damping is done with some type of foam damping material in which this is used to "TUNE" a panel to smooth out its frequency response. It can be applied directly on to the panel and or on to the panel frame. Shelly Katz Podium speakers gave me the idea to use this technique and it works. http://www.stereomojo.com/Podium%20....akerReview.htm

      One of the best "ACCURATE", sounding DML's speakers are from a Russian company called Sheet Control.> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JheZ84QcZPw

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBXQyR1EwSs

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PLweDrL4EDc


      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MsEg7RjunhQ&t=96s This video compares DML to Dynaudio.

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      • Originally posted by viewcart View Post
        A controlled and predictable speaker cone is significantly more accurate than a random piece of wood/plastic/composite material vibrating. Isn’t the goal of speakers to accurately reproduce recordings?
        Instruments are vibrating material. Whats more accurate then a panel vibrating like a instrument.

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        • It seems some people (on the other forum) dont understand about DML's and bass. Besides having very limited pistonic motion exciters are also not efficient in the bass region. When running full range a exciters mid to high frequencies efficiency will be way higher then the bass which will over power and drown out the bass frequencies. The way to fix it is to use the exciter as sub to only produce the low frequencies 100hz and below. A sub amp is needed as it will push the exciter to produce pistonic motion but wont have the higher frequencies to drown out the lower frequencies.


          My DML sat/sub combo is my top preferred design as it has great high frequencies and well as the low frequencies down to 40hz.

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          • mhester
            mhester commented
            Editing a comment
            I saw the Tech Ingredients vid a year or so ago and have wanted to experiment with this at some point (need to finish my Classix 2.5's first...) This is a very long thread and I'm not sure if you've previously posted your sub design. Can you kindly share that (again?)

        • Another thing that is great about DML's is that you can custom tune your panels to your preference. You can make them sound bright, dark, forward sounding laid back sounding its all based on how one tunes there panel as the combinations are endless. One can even change the soundstage and imaging of a panel. These tuning changes can be done in as little as 30 seconds per speaker with very little cost and no tools required.

          With conventional cone drivers the usual way to change the sound is to change the crossover and even then its very limited and time consuming, not to mention all the costly tools and parts needed to do so.

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          • During this covid time (3 months 7 days a week 2-4 hrs a day lol) I've been experimenting with many different placements of the exciters including the use of 2 exciters per panel. What I have found is that the 2/5-3/5 rule of exciter placement is bogus. Not sure who first thought of those placements as the standard (NXT?) but it seems P.E. guide and T.I. youtube vid like to use those placements.

            Most just blindly follow those standard placements instead of experimenting for themselves as most cant think outside the box. lol

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            • First post to this forum, apologies if I get things wrong.

              i have a need to place audio monitors in a setting that is extremely space constrained, and think the flat panel approach could be really helpful, ie a monitor that is <3 inches thick. However, it seems there is no easy way of making the flat panel ‘one sided’ so that the volume on one side is loud, the other side quiet. I think I know the answer, that there isn’t an easy way to do this but thought I would throw the question out to this group - is it possible to build some sort of thin enclosure / baffle on the “back” of the panel to stop sound going in that direction?

              thanks for any insights.

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              • Originally posted by NW Sailor View Post
                First post to this forum, apologies if I get things wrong.

                i have a need to place audio monitors in a setting that is extremely space constrained, and think the flat panel approach could be really helpful, ie a monitor that is <3 inches thick. However, it seems there is no easy way of making the flat panel ‘one sided’ so that the volume on one side is loud, the other side quiet. I think I know the answer, that there isn’t an easy way to do this but thought I would throw the question out to this group - is it possible to build some sort of thin enclosure / baffle on the “back” of the panel to stop sound going in that direction?

                thanks for any insights.
                Yes its possible to build a sealed enclosure on the back just like a conventional cone boxed speaker. I would make a 1inchX2inch frame and just cover the back with a thin (1/4-1/8) piece of wood.

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                • If you want to utilize some of that energy from the back of the DML panel you can also make a front firing slot port as this will increase sound output from the front.

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