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  1. #1

    Default Epoxy on MDF before painting


    Has anyone tried using epoxy on MDF as a primer/sealer/filler prior to painting.

    I bought some epoxy at <A HREF="http://www.epoxyheads.com">www.epoxyheads.com</A>. It is pretty slick. You can get metered pumps to meter out exactly the amounts you need. You can use it prior to painting to protect against moisture and such. I tried it on my garage door. I am not sure how it will hold up, but I got to thinking it ought to seal real well, and possibly be a good filler/sealer for the edgees of MDF.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Epoxy on MDF before painting


    I haven't tried it but it should work. Test a small piece first. Prep and finish with your intended paint. That way if there are and adhesion problems or compatibility issues, you'll find out on a piece of scrap instead of your project.

    I prefer to use either shellac or clear lacquer for a sealer on most natural wood projects. You could also try Kilz on painted projects.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    North California
    Posts
    1,263

    Default Re: Epoxy on MDF before painting


    I would just get some auto sandable primer works excellent and is alot cheaper!A.H.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Epoxy on MDF before painting


    > Has anyone tried using epoxy on MDF

    Don't reveal the best kept DIY secrets :wink:

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Posts
    929

    Default Re: Epoxy on MDF before painting


    > Don't reveal the best kept DIY secrets
    > :wink:

    Tee Hee....another hint...West Systems Epoxy is the ticket. They have a metering pump system, and once you epoxy the end-grain, sand it down and it looks like glass! Some swelling may still occur when you paint as the face grain will absorb moisture, however, using one coat of epoxy eliminates 5 coats of paint...and mine has lasted several projects, and is still more than half full!

  6. #6

    Default Re: Epoxy on MDF before painting


    west systems is the shiznat! but dry time is kinda long. Light weight body filler is MUCH quicker but not as strong as the epoxy. Depends on the surface you are coating and its' exspected abuse level. All of the epoxies that i have used take paint as well as the surface around it but there are some differences. The hold-out or how much the surface absorbes paint is different and be sure to sand the epoxy surface to take the 'shine' off of it, this gives a better tooth to the paint of choice. Use a paper or metal cup for mixing the W.S. epoxies. Some plastic cups will melt and really make a serious mess.

    Word of caution!!!! some foams will actually smoke and may catch fire after sustained contact with W.S. epoxies. Other brands may have the same danger level. My old partner and i poured some extra epoxie into the trash can, the one that had scraps of the split side, black, foam pipe insulation. Within 5 munits the epoxie started to kick and the heat from the reaction had the trash can looking like it was about to set the garage on fire! Nasty foam smoke!! not good stuff to breath. only other drawback is the low U.V. resistance level. This stuff must be painted/topcoated with an exterior rated top coat if it is to see any outdoor or weather exposed duty.

    The shelac based primers, like zinzer, is fantastic stuff. dries super fast for paint from a quart/gallon can and sands to a glass like finish after several coats, left to dry properly each time of course. main drawback to this stuff is that the only way to really clean a spray gun or brush, is to use straight ammonia, like the stuff on the bottom shelf of the cleaning supply shelf at the grocery store. Straight ammonia will burn the hair from your nose, water your eyes to the point of blindness and stink-up a large area. USE WITH CAUTION!!. it can be thinned with water but solvent strength on shelac is reduced and cleanning time is extended.

    > Tee Hee....another hint...West Systems Epoxy
    > is the ticket. They have a metering pump
    > system, and once you epoxy the end-grain,
    > sand it down and it looks like glass! Some
    > swelling may still occur when you paint as
    > the face grain will absorb moisture,
    > however, using one coat of epoxy eliminates
    > 5 coats of paint...and mine has lasted
    > several projects, and is still more than
    > half full!


  7. #7

    Default Re: Epoxy on MDF before painting


    > Has anyone tried using epoxy on MDF as a
    > primer/sealer/filler prior to painting.

    > I bought some epoxy at <A HREF="http://www.epoxyheads.com">www.epoxyheads.com</A> .
    > It is pretty slick. You can get metered
    > pumps to meter out exactly the amounts you
    > need. You can use it prior to painting to
    > protect against moisture and such. I tried
    > it on my garage door. I am not sure how it
    > will hold up, but I got to thinking it ought
    > to seal real well, and possibly be a good
    > filler/sealer for the edgees of MDF.

    My current favorite method is water based poly, brushed on. No overspray, easy cleanup, fumes nowhere near as bad as lacquer (auto primer) or epoxy. Easy to saud, and easy to get a glass-smooth finish. Builds fast, dries pretty fast, and can recoat whenever you want.

    Spraying it would eliminate about half the sanding, but then you get overspray to deal with.



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