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  • PassingInterest
    replied
    I like the results.

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    With Mrs. Interest. I'm not done yet, but they are coming along nicely.

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  • PassingInterest
    replied
    Thanks, Don!

    Let's make some putty. We'll start by collecting some fine, powdery wood dust, which woodworkers refer to as wood flour. This is Walnut.

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    Stir in some water based polyurethane finish. Too thick? Add more poly, or water--since it is water based. Too thin? Add more wood flour. Too light in color? Mix in some dark wood flour or add some stain or Trans-Tint. Too dark? Add some lighter wood flour or just switch to a lighter wood flour all together.

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    I filled some cracks in and around some naturally occurring knots. I am done for the day, so we'll check the results after sanding tomorrow.

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  • donradick
    replied
    As usual, great tutorial picture documentation.
    Gotta say, that red cedar is pretty interesting!

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  • PassingInterest
    replied
    I neglected to get a "before" shot of this big knot hole, which goes all the way through. I have never used this putty before. It is like Bondo, you mix the hardener with the putty. I thought I needed some strength here and this stuff delivered. It is difficult to tell in this photo, but there are actually two sticks in the puttied knot hole. I am attempting to simulate a double knot and I hope to make it blend well enough to look natural.
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    After cutting and sanding.
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    Dang, I meant to get a shot of this right after using a Red Mahogany stain pen to color the knot area. It would have been great to show the transformation in process. Anyway, the putty did not absorb much of the stain. The sticks absorbed a bit more. The puttied area darkened just a little and I thought my two "knots" looked perfect, but the area around it looks too pale. I then used a brown Sharpie marker on the putty. I think it looks pretty natural. I won't know for sure until I get a coat of finish on it.
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    I think it looks pretty natural after one coat of finish. As of this moment, Mrs. Interest has no idea about the repair, but she took a look and said it looked good. I even pointed out the "knot" and she said she likes it, it gives the wood some character, because it is naturally occurring. A serious wood expert might say, "That looks like a couple of branches from your Crepe Myrtle Tree out front." But, most of us are not likely to realize that it is not a naturally occurring double branch knot. Oh, of course I made sure the branches were not fresh. They were dead and dry and snapped right off the tree with little effort.
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  • PassingInterest
    replied
    Template routing some Red Oak.

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    Here's a tip: clamp a piece of scrap at the end of the cut to avoid splintering and chip out as the bit pushes through.

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    Nice and clean, no tear out.

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    Here is the easy way to remove nails from your template or work piece.

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    I had to push the fence back, because of the curves. But, that does not mean that I am not using the fence at all. I push one corner of the work piece firmly against the fence to anchor it, then pivot the other end into the spinning bit to begin the cut. This avoids a sudden pulling and chip out when the bit initially contacts the wood.

    Right after I took this photo, I realized that I forgot to trim some waste at the band saw before routing. I took it to the band saw immediately after this shot.

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  • ani_101
    replied
    thanks for the explanation and the picture.

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  • PassingInterest
    replied
    Here is an example of "ghosting" or "witness lines," where I polished through the top coat, into the next coat of poly on a previous project.

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  • PassingInterest
    replied
    Red Oak panels, ready to shape and sand.

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    My wife wants me to do a pair in Cedar. I'm not really sure about the look. I wouldn't have chosen it for this project. I thought I would use Ash. But of the three woods used, she is most excited about the Cedar. I'll give it a try.

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    Preparing to joint and plane the Cedar.

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    Cedar panel glue-up.

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    Spin and spray. I'm still applying coats of waterborne poly to seal the wood and make it smooth, before painting the feet black. I did the same thing for the mini hockey pucks, seen in the background on the left.

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  • PassingInterest
    replied
    Thanks, Tompart! I try to gear my threads to help beginners.


    Originally posted by ani_101 View Post
    What do you like better, the emtech or crytalac? I will start into spraying lacquer, so some tips would be appreciated.
    The Crystalac is a waterborne polyurethane. Poly does not "burn-in" to previous layers like lacquer does. This is something to be aware of. Each layer of poly sits on top of the previous layer. So, if you want to polish the topcoat, you run the risk of sanding through the top layer. The end result will appear as though you have sort of "pools" where you sanded or polished through to the next layer. In woodworking, this is called "ghosting." In the automotive finishing world, it is referred to as "witness lines." A picture would help. I'll add one later, if I find one. The only solution is to spray another coat and start your final finishing over again. This is just something to be aware of. If you are careful, you won't have a problem.

    Lacquer on the other hand, partially dissolves the surface of the previous layer of lacquer and the layers become one, no matter how many coats you apply, they all become one thick coat, all melded together.

    Having said all that. I like them both. Whatever you spray, make sure you wear a filter cartridge respirator, so you don't wreck your lungs.

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  • ani_101
    replied
    What do you like better, the emtech or crytalac? I will start into spraying lacquer, so some tips would be appreciated.

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  • Tompart
    replied
    I
    love the design of these speakers and thank you so much for adding a step by step with pictures this will prove great for beginners

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  • PassingInterest
    replied
    Foot-Grinder Rev A. (Wait for the second picture).

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    Rev. A.

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    Just sanding the discs that go on top of the base, directly over each foot.

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    I started to use Crystalac Black polyurethane paint, but I soon realized that I don't have enough. I thought I had another can. So I switched over to the EmTech product shown below. I intended to shoot two clear coats over it, but I like the way it looks without it. The paint and the clear product are waterborne lacquers. I added EmTech's Crosslinker to the paint, to make it stronger and more chemical resistant.

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    This is the finish I used on the Mahogany panels.

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  • Kevin K.
    replied
    Originally posted by PassingInterest View Post

    Thanks, Kevin! I hope you enjoyed MWAF. Sorry I couldn't make it. It would have been cool to hook up there.

    I always worry that I am taking too many pictures and providing too much detail, so I don't have much to share on these Mahogany panels. I'll go into more detail with the next ones, which will be Red Oak. The finish I used was Minwax Oil Modified Water Based Polyurethane and yes, I polished the panels. Sorry for the lack of details, but stay tuned and I'll go into the finishing process later.
    MWAF was a blast, sorry you couldn't attend, perhaps next year. No need to worry about taking too many pictures or providing too much detail, most members like pics. Besides, you've got more tricks up your sleeves than Houdini. There may not be a lot of guys making comments in your thread but based on the number of visits it's seen, I gander it's more than just Don and myself following along.

    Like Don, I'm curious about the black paint you shot on the baffles. I can see the spray gun and what looks like a quart of paint in the photo but can't make it out.

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  • donradick
    replied
    Jeepers! Those sides look good on the box. I might have missed it, what did you end up using on the baffles?

    Good tip on the hole saw. I've thrown a few away in disgust when they started smoking a lot.

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  • PassingInterest
    replied
    I glued another half-inch on the feet to get the height I wanted and to make the bottom solid - no hole in the center.

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    Shaping the feet. I cut an 18 degree angle in a board and clamped it to the table to use as a guide for my makeshift shaping jig. Shaping was fast and easy this way.

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    Then a quick pass with some sandpaper at the drill press and I am ready to paint the feet.

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